Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

New beginning for Dewey Defeats Truman

"We realize how fun it is to play music again.”

For a decade bassist/singer James Reader and drummer Scott Frazier were in two different “Casbah bands” that went on to get national buzz: Red Dye No. 5 and, later, Dewey Defeats Truman.

The 1995 Red Dye single “Head Phuck” sparked national interest in the three-man, one-woman band. “We did a private showcase for [Atlantic Records vice president] Jason Flom who flew in from New York to see us play at a private showcase at Dream Street in OB. IRS and Giant Records were looking at us. That’s when other San Diego bands we used to play with like Inch and No Knife were really going off.”

Red Dye No. 5 signed with New York-based Flip Records. Reader says the band/label relationship was hampered following an ugly confrontation between Reader and a member of another band on the Flip label, Limp Bizkit.

“I had a falling out with [Bizkit frontman] Fred Durst. He is a scumbag…. We were railroaded by the label into attending a show where they were opening for Korn.” Without going into detail, Reader says there was a tour bus confrontation. “The chemistry between us and the label was never the same after that. Durst is a two-faced snake.”

Red Dye recorded an album with producer Tim O’Heir. “The day we delivered the record our manager quit,” says Reader. “The label president said ‘I just spent $40,000 on a record, what am I supposed to do now? I told him we didn’t need a manager right then. He tried to set us up with someone we didn’t know. We got into a raging argument. I told him he could shove the record up his ass. I knew the record wouldn’t come out after that.”

Red Dye No. 5 broke up in 2000. But two years ago, Reader says he was contacted by a former Flip label staffer who found the original recording and gave it to the band, who in turn gave it to Silver Girl, the small local label that had released the first single two decades earlier. Silver Girl released The Fort Apache Sessions album on red vinyl, which then led to speculation that Red Dye No. 5 might reunite. Reader says it didn’t happen for the same reason the band broke up 18 years ago: disharmony among bandmates.

When Red Dye fell apart, “Scott and I knew Mark from a band called Luper,” says Reader. “We formed DDT [Dewey Defeats Truman].” He says that band toured the country — they played South by Southwest in Austin and the CMJ showcase in New York City — and recorded without any of the drama and inner turmoil that plagued Red Dye. But somewhere along the way, “We were soured on the whole major label thing. We had so many dinners with label execs and lawyers. It turned into a nightmare. For Dewey, we just had independent labels release our stuff.”

But Dewey Defeats Truman got worn down by constant touring and dealing with vans that broke down in the middle of Nebraska. “We were physically exhausted,” says Reader. “We were deflated as a band. We told ourselves we’d just take three months to regroup. Then it became five months. We kept paying for our rehearsal space for a year but never used it. At that point we unceremoniously broke up. But we always remained friends.”

Past Event

Irradio and Dewey Defeats Truman

  • Thursday, December 6, 2018, 8 p.m.
  • Casbah, 2501 Kettner Boulevard, San Diego
  • 21+ / $10

More

After 15 years on hiatus, Reader, Frazier, and singer/guitarist Mark MacBride are reanimating Dewey Defeats Truman. “Now we are playing music without the pressure to get to the next level. We realize how fun it is to play music again.”

The three are reuniting at the Casbah at the request of the 91X Loudspeaker show which is holding a year-long series of shows featuring local bands that were part of its 30-year history. In preparation for the reunion show, Frazier has been flying down from Sacramento where he works as an industrial project manager to practice with his longtime Dewey bandmates. MacBride works for Sony as a video game sound designer, and Reader is a locksmith.

Dewey Defeats Truman and Irradio (playing their first show in ten years) reunite Thursday, December 6 at the Casbah. Demasiado and Miss New Buddha also perform. The first one hundred people through the door get a free blue-vinyl Dewey Defeats Truman 7-inch single courtesy of Silver Girl Records.

Can you go back? “Who knows how our songs will translate. We’re about to find out. I was a scenester back in the day. If I wasn’t playing there I would be at the Casbah two or three times a week. Who knows what’s next? Maybe we’ll climb back in the van again. It feels like a new beginning.”

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Homemade style Mexican food in Lemon Grove available
San Diego Reader Classified ads
April 5, 2020
Will pay cash...
San Diego Reader Classified ads
March 24, 2020
1972 VW bus type 2 $22,000.
San Diego Reader Classified ads
March 24, 2020
Monadnock PR-24s police baton/night stick - $80
San Diego Reader Classified ads
March 27, 2020
Elvis Presley 5 Cd's
San Diego Reader Classified ads
March 26, 2020
Ad
Previous article

Six tanka by Andrew Hamlin

Throw open the window in winter
Next Article

Pan-demic

Angry nature god’s wrathful punishment seen everywhere
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Dewey Defeats Truman (from left, James Reader, Mark MacBride and Scott Frazier) will reunite after a 15-year hiatus, Thursday, December 6 at the Casbah.
Dewey Defeats Truman (from left, James Reader, Mark MacBride and Scott Frazier) will reunite after a 15-year hiatus, Thursday, December 6 at the Casbah.

For a decade bassist/singer James Reader and drummer Scott Frazier were in two different “Casbah bands” that went on to get national buzz: Red Dye No. 5 and, later, Dewey Defeats Truman.

The 1995 Red Dye single “Head Phuck” sparked national interest in the three-man, one-woman band. “We did a private showcase for [Atlantic Records vice president] Jason Flom who flew in from New York to see us play at a private showcase at Dream Street in OB. IRS and Giant Records were looking at us. That’s when other San Diego bands we used to play with like Inch and No Knife were really going off.”

Red Dye No. 5 signed with New York-based Flip Records. Reader says the band/label relationship was hampered following an ugly confrontation between Reader and a member of another band on the Flip label, Limp Bizkit.

“I had a falling out with [Bizkit frontman] Fred Durst. He is a scumbag…. We were railroaded by the label into attending a show where they were opening for Korn.” Without going into detail, Reader says there was a tour bus confrontation. “The chemistry between us and the label was never the same after that. Durst is a two-faced snake.”

Red Dye recorded an album with producer Tim O’Heir. “The day we delivered the record our manager quit,” says Reader. “The label president said ‘I just spent $40,000 on a record, what am I supposed to do now? I told him we didn’t need a manager right then. He tried to set us up with someone we didn’t know. We got into a raging argument. I told him he could shove the record up his ass. I knew the record wouldn’t come out after that.”

Red Dye No. 5 broke up in 2000. But two years ago, Reader says he was contacted by a former Flip label staffer who found the original recording and gave it to the band, who in turn gave it to Silver Girl, the small local label that had released the first single two decades earlier. Silver Girl released The Fort Apache Sessions album on red vinyl, which then led to speculation that Red Dye No. 5 might reunite. Reader says it didn’t happen for the same reason the band broke up 18 years ago: disharmony among bandmates.

When Red Dye fell apart, “Scott and I knew Mark from a band called Luper,” says Reader. “We formed DDT [Dewey Defeats Truman].” He says that band toured the country — they played South by Southwest in Austin and the CMJ showcase in New York City — and recorded without any of the drama and inner turmoil that plagued Red Dye. But somewhere along the way, “We were soured on the whole major label thing. We had so many dinners with label execs and lawyers. It turned into a nightmare. For Dewey, we just had independent labels release our stuff.”

But Dewey Defeats Truman got worn down by constant touring and dealing with vans that broke down in the middle of Nebraska. “We were physically exhausted,” says Reader. “We were deflated as a band. We told ourselves we’d just take three months to regroup. Then it became five months. We kept paying for our rehearsal space for a year but never used it. At that point we unceremoniously broke up. But we always remained friends.”

Past Event

Irradio and Dewey Defeats Truman

  • Thursday, December 6, 2018, 8 p.m.
  • Casbah, 2501 Kettner Boulevard, San Diego
  • 21+ / $10

More

After 15 years on hiatus, Reader, Frazier, and singer/guitarist Mark MacBride are reanimating Dewey Defeats Truman. “Now we are playing music without the pressure to get to the next level. We realize how fun it is to play music again.”

The three are reuniting at the Casbah at the request of the 91X Loudspeaker show which is holding a year-long series of shows featuring local bands that were part of its 30-year history. In preparation for the reunion show, Frazier has been flying down from Sacramento where he works as an industrial project manager to practice with his longtime Dewey bandmates. MacBride works for Sony as a video game sound designer, and Reader is a locksmith.

Dewey Defeats Truman and Irradio (playing their first show in ten years) reunite Thursday, December 6 at the Casbah. Demasiado and Miss New Buddha also perform. The first one hundred people through the door get a free blue-vinyl Dewey Defeats Truman 7-inch single courtesy of Silver Girl Records.

Can you go back? “Who knows how our songs will translate. We’re about to find out. I was a scenester back in the day. If I wasn’t playing there I would be at the Casbah two or three times a week. Who knows what’s next? Maybe we’ll climb back in the van again. It feels like a new beginning.”

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Survival food
San Diego Reader Classified ads
March 24, 2020
Volunteer drivers
San Diego Reader Classified ads
March 24, 2020
House of Black Coffee Company is hiring
San Diego Reader Classified ads
April 5, 2020
Eastwood (Hofner) Club bass guitar
San Diego Reader Classified ads
March 26, 2020
Jumpstart your success
San Diego Reader Classified ads
March 24, 2020
Previous article

No meat, no waste, no dining in: newly opened The Plot goes express

In the age of isolation, trying a buzzy new restaurant means ordering take out
Next Article

TP Mummy torn roll from roll by crazed, pantsless mob

Monstrous Prank, Bro
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close