4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Ebisu

This Hillcrest sushi bar has a few great sashimi specials that give it serious credibility.

I popped into Ebisu in Hillcrest on a whim, tired and hungry and feeling like taking myself out to sushi. It’s proximal to me but I’ve never gone there before. I couldn’t explain why, but it might have something to do with enjoying the search for a meal as much as the meal itself. Anyways, I’ve always found it hard to judge sushi places by looks alone. More difficult than with other types of restaurants, anyways. Ebisu, I would have assumed fell into the low-end “sake bombs and overdone rolls” category, but it ended up showing a greater degree of refinement.

I appreciated the small-ish interior, muted decor, and general lack of clamor. The cozy dining room, dimly lighted and serene, had some classiness to it that you don’t quite get at neighboring sushi bars. I understand there’s a lounge with a full bar in the back of the building, but it’s only open Thursday through Saturday. I may go check it out sometime, as the scene could be cool with DJs and pretty good sushi being a weird combo that I’d like to see in action.

More than anything, I was impressed by the selection of sashimi specials ($12). Playing dress up with sashimi is a dicey affair, since it’s hard to do better than good fish and a touch of soy sauce, but Ebisu has found a way to walk that line. I tried a kanpachi (Hawaiian jack) sashimi special that had been dressed with lemon and chili oil, micro-cilantro, and a few grains of briny black lava salt. It wasn’t advertised, but I tasted a rich base of roasted goma, perhaps the chili had been infused into sesame oil.

I’ll disclaim that I prefer my fish room temperature, and Ebisu’s sushi and sashimi were all served cool. It actually worked out for the kanpachi, however, as the fatty fish was pleasingly firm at first and softened quickly. The extra flavors adorned the fish just enough to bring out something special, but not so much as to bury the delicacy of the flesh.

I strongly recommend the sashimi specials at Ebisu as long as they remain on the menu!

For the most part, I judge sushi by the rice and I enjoyed the rice served with my nigiri very much. Scallop ($5.50) and Uni ($8) both rested on top of salty, toothsome sushi rice that had been coaxed together without mashing the grains into an indistinguishable mass. I would say it was served at a good “body temperature,” although it tasted warmer in comparison to the too-cool fish. Diners should resist the urge to go crazy with the shoyu, as the saltiness of the rice is nearly perfect without addition.

Salmon skin rolls are, I think, a bit underappreciated. I enjoyed Ebisu’s roll, which housed crunchy, fried skin in the same good rice as the nigiri. With shaved bonito and sesame seeds adding a salty/savory edge to the whole creation, it was more interesting than plain salmon maki and texturally delightful.

None

I inspected Ebisu’s website ex post facto of dining there and found the following copy:

“As part of the next generation of sushi, Ebisu Sushi & Bar concocts modern creations while still paying respect to traditional flavors. Chefs Jay and Elijah create a whimsical menu, elevating classics and reimagining sushi using the freshest ingredients available.”

Normally, I would call shenanigans on such boastful claims, but I’ll concede the restaurant as much, at least as far as the sashimi specials were concerned!

3765 6th Avenue
619-297-3119
Sun-Wed 5-11
Th-Sat 5-12

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Celebrate the 27th James Bond film with the 6th James Bond film

No Time to Die indeed
Next Article

Rose Canyon Fault’s annual slip is about 2-3mm per year.

California Geological Survey releases new earthquake maps

I popped into Ebisu in Hillcrest on a whim, tired and hungry and feeling like taking myself out to sushi. It’s proximal to me but I’ve never gone there before. I couldn’t explain why, but it might have something to do with enjoying the search for a meal as much as the meal itself. Anyways, I’ve always found it hard to judge sushi places by looks alone. More difficult than with other types of restaurants, anyways. Ebisu, I would have assumed fell into the low-end “sake bombs and overdone rolls” category, but it ended up showing a greater degree of refinement.

I appreciated the small-ish interior, muted decor, and general lack of clamor. The cozy dining room, dimly lighted and serene, had some classiness to it that you don’t quite get at neighboring sushi bars. I understand there’s a lounge with a full bar in the back of the building, but it’s only open Thursday through Saturday. I may go check it out sometime, as the scene could be cool with DJs and pretty good sushi being a weird combo that I’d like to see in action.

More than anything, I was impressed by the selection of sashimi specials ($12). Playing dress up with sashimi is a dicey affair, since it’s hard to do better than good fish and a touch of soy sauce, but Ebisu has found a way to walk that line. I tried a kanpachi (Hawaiian jack) sashimi special that had been dressed with lemon and chili oil, micro-cilantro, and a few grains of briny black lava salt. It wasn’t advertised, but I tasted a rich base of roasted goma, perhaps the chili had been infused into sesame oil.

I’ll disclaim that I prefer my fish room temperature, and Ebisu’s sushi and sashimi were all served cool. It actually worked out for the kanpachi, however, as the fatty fish was pleasingly firm at first and softened quickly. The extra flavors adorned the fish just enough to bring out something special, but not so much as to bury the delicacy of the flesh.

I strongly recommend the sashimi specials at Ebisu as long as they remain on the menu!

For the most part, I judge sushi by the rice and I enjoyed the rice served with my nigiri very much. Scallop ($5.50) and Uni ($8) both rested on top of salty, toothsome sushi rice that had been coaxed together without mashing the grains into an indistinguishable mass. I would say it was served at a good “body temperature,” although it tasted warmer in comparison to the too-cool fish. Diners should resist the urge to go crazy with the shoyu, as the saltiness of the rice is nearly perfect without addition.

Salmon skin rolls are, I think, a bit underappreciated. I enjoyed Ebisu’s roll, which housed crunchy, fried skin in the same good rice as the nigiri. With shaved bonito and sesame seeds adding a salty/savory edge to the whole creation, it was more interesting than plain salmon maki and texturally delightful.

None

I inspected Ebisu’s website ex post facto of dining there and found the following copy:

“As part of the next generation of sushi, Ebisu Sushi & Bar concocts modern creations while still paying respect to traditional flavors. Chefs Jay and Elijah create a whimsical menu, elevating classics and reimagining sushi using the freshest ingredients available.”

Normally, I would call shenanigans on such boastful claims, but I’ll concede the restaurant as much, at least as far as the sashimi specials were concerned!

3765 6th Avenue
619-297-3119
Sun-Wed 5-11
Th-Sat 5-12

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Drinks All Around — Bartenders' drink recipes Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Outdoors — Weekly changes in flora and fauna Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Street Style — San Diego streets have style Surf Diego — Real stories from those braving the waves Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close