4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Beer Touring: Stumblefoot Brewing Company

Days spent hitting up four or five local breweries used to be something I’d devote two or three days a year to. These days, with new breweries opening up like crazy and roughly a dozen slated to debut this year, more frequent scouting missions are required to stay on top of the expanding scene. Last Friday, I rounded up some craft beer industry insiders to check out five brewing companies, all of which recently opened or are slated to open within the next several months.

My first stop was at Stumblefoot Brewing Company in San Marcos. That municipality is no stranger to good beer. It was home to Stone Brewing Co.’s original brewery, which was later taken over by Pizza Port and transformed into the production facility for their Port Brewing and Lost Abbey brands. Not far from that spot is craft suds haven, Churchill’s Pub & Grille, and the future site of Rip Current Brewing Company.

The product of brothers Bill Randolph and Pat Horton, homebrewing partners of 11 years, Stumblefoot’s business park suite operation is located far from the aforementioned businesses, just west of San Elijo Hills and north of University Commons. We arrived in the early afternoon and were surprised at how many visitors stumbled in as we worked our way through a taster flight of the seven beers on-tap. Despite being in a pretty remote spot, they’ve clearly endeared themselves to the area's businesses and residents in the short month they’ve been open.

Stumblefoot’s brews are varied and include styles seldom seen in San Diego including a dunkelweizen and schwarzbier. The latter was the better of the rarities, exhibiting a big roastiness in the nose and on the palate, and the type of drinkability desired in this dark, low ABV style.

Also varied along the line is the level of quality from a textbook perspective. A robust porter billed as Mojo American Stout was thick, roasty and delicious, while an amber ale had out-of-style buttery notes, and an IPA tasted like dry grass and thistle and lacked hop bitterness. The lack of hop punch is the result of Randolph and Horton using non-standard hops due to the lack of availability of more standard hop varieties. Many small breweries struggle with this, but in the end, what matters is proper flavors and, regardless of why, Stumblefoot’s Grassyass IPA doesn’t deliver them.

The best beer of the bunch was the Otay Chipotle Stout. Chile beers are all the rage right now. Many blow minds and palates with their capsaicin potency, but this beer was nothing like that. A clean heat that’s more akin to peppercorns yet carries with it a slight vegetal backdrop is present in the front palate and the finish but in no way takes away from or clashes with the chocolate maltiness of the beer, which dominates the mid-palate. It’s not surprising to learn this beer won numerous awards in its life as a homebrew contender.

None

Much of the brothers’ homebrew equipment is still being used to produce Stumblefoot’s line. It’s clear there have been some growing pains in ramping up production and processes to pro levels, but Randolph embraces that and human nature, freely admitting that mistakes sometimes occur which need to be fixed mid-brew. An example of that was when they brewed their first batch of beer, drew too much water, then turned it into a double batch and blended backward to hit their targeted ratio. That sort of thing, coupled with the serendipitous chain of events leading he and his brother to where they are as professional brewers, both figuratively and geographically, is what the name Stumblefoot refers to.

They’ll need some time and refinement to get in line with the likes of their Port-side neighbors, but for now, they’re just where they need to be—finding their way while developing their chops and bringing craft beer to a subsect of San Marcos that didn’t have it in their backyards until this passion-fueled business set up shop.

Stumblefoot Brewing Company is located at 1784 La Costa Meadows Drive, Suite 103.

None

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Ocean warms up, Mexican coral trees bloom along the 94

African Daisy – the perfect freeway flower
Next Article

The legend of Billy Jack: “Peace Through Pummeling.”

He was a half-breed Vietnam vet who hated what war stood for

Days spent hitting up four or five local breweries used to be something I’d devote two or three days a year to. These days, with new breweries opening up like crazy and roughly a dozen slated to debut this year, more frequent scouting missions are required to stay on top of the expanding scene. Last Friday, I rounded up some craft beer industry insiders to check out five brewing companies, all of which recently opened or are slated to open within the next several months.

My first stop was at Stumblefoot Brewing Company in San Marcos. That municipality is no stranger to good beer. It was home to Stone Brewing Co.’s original brewery, which was later taken over by Pizza Port and transformed into the production facility for their Port Brewing and Lost Abbey brands. Not far from that spot is craft suds haven, Churchill’s Pub & Grille, and the future site of Rip Current Brewing Company.

The product of brothers Bill Randolph and Pat Horton, homebrewing partners of 11 years, Stumblefoot’s business park suite operation is located far from the aforementioned businesses, just west of San Elijo Hills and north of University Commons. We arrived in the early afternoon and were surprised at how many visitors stumbled in as we worked our way through a taster flight of the seven beers on-tap. Despite being in a pretty remote spot, they’ve clearly endeared themselves to the area's businesses and residents in the short month they’ve been open.

Stumblefoot’s brews are varied and include styles seldom seen in San Diego including a dunkelweizen and schwarzbier. The latter was the better of the rarities, exhibiting a big roastiness in the nose and on the palate, and the type of drinkability desired in this dark, low ABV style.

Also varied along the line is the level of quality from a textbook perspective. A robust porter billed as Mojo American Stout was thick, roasty and delicious, while an amber ale had out-of-style buttery notes, and an IPA tasted like dry grass and thistle and lacked hop bitterness. The lack of hop punch is the result of Randolph and Horton using non-standard hops due to the lack of availability of more standard hop varieties. Many small breweries struggle with this, but in the end, what matters is proper flavors and, regardless of why, Stumblefoot’s Grassyass IPA doesn’t deliver them.

The best beer of the bunch was the Otay Chipotle Stout. Chile beers are all the rage right now. Many blow minds and palates with their capsaicin potency, but this beer was nothing like that. A clean heat that’s more akin to peppercorns yet carries with it a slight vegetal backdrop is present in the front palate and the finish but in no way takes away from or clashes with the chocolate maltiness of the beer, which dominates the mid-palate. It’s not surprising to learn this beer won numerous awards in its life as a homebrew contender.

None

Much of the brothers’ homebrew equipment is still being used to produce Stumblefoot’s line. It’s clear there have been some growing pains in ramping up production and processes to pro levels, but Randolph embraces that and human nature, freely admitting that mistakes sometimes occur which need to be fixed mid-brew. An example of that was when they brewed their first batch of beer, drew too much water, then turned it into a double batch and blended backward to hit their targeted ratio. That sort of thing, coupled with the serendipitous chain of events leading he and his brother to where they are as professional brewers, both figuratively and geographically, is what the name Stumblefoot refers to.

They’ll need some time and refinement to get in line with the likes of their Port-side neighbors, but for now, they’re just where they need to be—finding their way while developing their chops and bringing craft beer to a subsect of San Marcos that didn’t have it in their backyards until this passion-fueled business set up shop.

Stumblefoot Brewing Company is located at 1784 La Costa Meadows Drive, Suite 103.

None

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Coming Attractions: The Summer of Karl

Next Article

Beer Touring: Fezziwig's Brewing

Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close