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What will One Paseo look like?

Despite compromise and progress, new design isn't drawn yet

Artist's rendering of One Paseo
Artist's rendering of One Paseo

After six years of fighting, some residents of Carmel Valley got what they wanted on May 21: a scaled-down version of Los Angeles–based Kilroy Realty's mixed-use project, One Paseo.

Moments before a city-council hearing to decide whether the city would rescind their previous approval or send it to the ballot, representatives from Kilroy Realty announced that they reached a compromise with three community groups and the owner of a nearby shopping center, agreeing to reduce the amount of retail and office space included in the project, thus reducing the impacts to traffic.

“Kilroy has worked to deliver a project that meets many of the goals of the community, including more shops, restaurants, homes, and public open space,” said John Kilroy in a statement issued moments before the hearing on One Paseo. “After significantly refining the project a number of times, this new project allows us to provide additional amenities to Carmel Valley without the delay of a protracted legal battle.”

Added Bob Fuchs, Carmel Valley resident and co-founder of What Price Main Street, “I believe that the coalition members, though not a party to the negotiations, will find the settlement conditions consistent with what has been advocated for many years, and will be happy to leave the controversy behind and look forward to reviewing a project the community can be proud of.”

The announcement made for a celebratory mood in council chambers.

"It's been a long few days," said Kilroy Realty's director of development in San Diego, Jamas Gwilliam. "We are pleased to be in this place. And while the revised project is not fully designed, we will be working under certain parameters to address the community concerns. We believe this is a fair compromise. After nearly seven years of near continual dialogue we are looking forward to getting this started."

As stated by Gwilliam, little is known on what the new One Paseo will look like, aside from promises by Kilroy to reduce daily auto trips by half on El Camino Real and Del Mar Heights Road; setting buildings back 30 feet from streets was another part of the compromise. Kilroy also assured community members that buildings will not be built over seven-stories.

Council president Sherri Lightner said, “I did not believe that a compromise was possible on Monday because of what had transpired up to that point. I am glad I was wrong.”

Some members of community planning groups expressed their frustration over the fact that the council approved the project despite opposition from Carmel Valley and other neighborhood planning groups.

One Paseo's new design will be shown to the Carmel Valley Community Planning Board and San Diego's Planning Commission before receiving final approval from city council.

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Artist's rendering of One Paseo
Artist's rendering of One Paseo

After six years of fighting, some residents of Carmel Valley got what they wanted on May 21: a scaled-down version of Los Angeles–based Kilroy Realty's mixed-use project, One Paseo.

Moments before a city-council hearing to decide whether the city would rescind their previous approval or send it to the ballot, representatives from Kilroy Realty announced that they reached a compromise with three community groups and the owner of a nearby shopping center, agreeing to reduce the amount of retail and office space included in the project, thus reducing the impacts to traffic.

“Kilroy has worked to deliver a project that meets many of the goals of the community, including more shops, restaurants, homes, and public open space,” said John Kilroy in a statement issued moments before the hearing on One Paseo. “After significantly refining the project a number of times, this new project allows us to provide additional amenities to Carmel Valley without the delay of a protracted legal battle.”

Added Bob Fuchs, Carmel Valley resident and co-founder of What Price Main Street, “I believe that the coalition members, though not a party to the negotiations, will find the settlement conditions consistent with what has been advocated for many years, and will be happy to leave the controversy behind and look forward to reviewing a project the community can be proud of.”

The announcement made for a celebratory mood in council chambers.

"It's been a long few days," said Kilroy Realty's director of development in San Diego, Jamas Gwilliam. "We are pleased to be in this place. And while the revised project is not fully designed, we will be working under certain parameters to address the community concerns. We believe this is a fair compromise. After nearly seven years of near continual dialogue we are looking forward to getting this started."

As stated by Gwilliam, little is known on what the new One Paseo will look like, aside from promises by Kilroy to reduce daily auto trips by half on El Camino Real and Del Mar Heights Road; setting buildings back 30 feet from streets was another part of the compromise. Kilroy also assured community members that buildings will not be built over seven-stories.

Council president Sherri Lightner said, “I did not believe that a compromise was possible on Monday because of what had transpired up to that point. I am glad I was wrong.”

Some members of community planning groups expressed their frustration over the fact that the council approved the project despite opposition from Carmel Valley and other neighborhood planning groups.

One Paseo's new design will be shown to the Carmel Valley Community Planning Board and San Diego's Planning Commission before receiving final approval from city council.

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18

Six years of fighting by determined residents was necessary just to prevent overreaching by a greedy developer. Kilroy learned that it could not push people in Carmel Valley around.

As time went on, thousands of residents joined the battle. Politicians witnessed a growing activism throughout San Diego.

Carmel Valley is desirable precisely because activists protected the community from Baldwin and Pardee in the past twenty years. These activists opposed over-development of the Del Mar Highlands Center. 40 million dollars and six years later, Kilroy learned their lesson - Carmel Valley residents will stand their ground.

Other communities will stand up against over development as a result of this struggle.

Kilroy thought they could go ten stories and create super-density. Just hire the right lobbyist who had the revolving door!

The politicians are basically in fear of tarnishing their environmental credentials by approving "Dumb Growth". They will have to pony up for public transit and face three new Supreme Court Justices who are pro-environment.

Residents are ready for the next round if Kilroy tries to overreach.

May 21, 2015

Let's hope you are right. Kilroy came across as an operation that never heard "no" before, or at least one that never had to accept that answer. But now this new proposal, which hasn't been seen because it doesn't exist--yet-- can be just about anything you can imagine. Until the details are done, nobody can just assume that Kilroy is giving up much or anything at all. While this concession is a bit of a watershed, until the plan is complete, I would not proclaim any sort of win for the locals who opposed the original deal. Those who think they prevailed in this fight are not finished. They better be ready to smack down things that they think that Kilroy was willing to give up, but which rear their ugly heads in the plans.

May 21, 2015

Hopefully that huge lawn in the pic will be artificial turf!

May 21, 2015

Reclaimed water perhaps??

May 22, 2015

I guess they could use gray water from the condos' sinks, bathtubs and washing machines, if Kllroy insists on having football-field size lawns!

May 23, 2015

What the City needs to think more about is redevelopment. There are many areas of the city that could use a bulldozer.

May 22, 2015

Redevelopment has become much more difficult, with the shutdown of redevelopment agencies statewide and the $billions in funding gone.

May 22, 2015

Developers always ask for the moon and their original plans appear to squeeze humanity into a shoebox. When they start their bargaining with that, what they end up with is usually about what they hoped for. It's ask a mile and settle for 3/4 of a mile. It's an old game and it gets played over and over again.

May 22, 2015

Rather like U.S. military budget negotiations, right?

May 22, 2015

Very much so. As a skeptic, I believe that the opponents cannot claim any victory in this "compromise." The land should have been open space and perhaps made into a park with a public pool, dog parks and other amenities. Just getting a sized down mega-development was not a win in my book. I don't know a lot about this story, but from my perspective it was just one established developer trying to thwart the plans of a new competitor. When I lived in Del Mar I thought the Del Mar Highlands was a monstrosity and it has been expanded since then. I cannot imagine living in that community now with this Kilroy cement jungle joining it.

May 22, 2015

Ponzi, what you mention is true. They always ask for more than they expect to get, because in almost every instance there is opposition, and then there is "compromise." If you ask for what you want and for what makes sense, you'll have to settle for less in negotiation. Well, that applies in most cities, but not, it seems, in Vista. Some few years ago a developer wanted to build upscale apartments in a spot down a steep embankment from freeway 78 (SW side) that I always thought of as a hole. The unit count requested was 314 units, served essentially by a frontage road. I'd always assumed they hoped to get about 214 approved, but the rubber-stamp city council approved the initial request, with no real demands to mitigate the traffic in the area. They could have demanded traffic signals at the closest freeway interchange to the west, which could really use some, but nobody ever seriously considered that.

In this case, they asked for something like Manhattan density (well, not really, but you get my drift) and now will downscale it to something like San Francisco minus the public transit and ambience. Yes, a "win" for the opponents.

May 23, 2015

The elephant in the room: San Diego's 10% affordable housing requirement. No Carmel Valley resident will ever admit to it, but they cringe at the thought of seeing the families of their housekeepers and landscapers strolling the same shopping centers or attending the same schools their children attend. No community in San Diego should be considered "exclusive," San Diego is for everyone.

May 23, 2015

The elephant in the room is; How many low income units of the revise/downsized Paseo One will be "low income"? There are already at least a few hundred low income projects in Carmel Valley, 60 more wont be noticed, nice try to smear a community. I live here and wouldn't mind a bit. Painting with a pretty wide brush pal.

May 23, 2015

Don't you mean a few hundred low income units (not "projects")?

May 24, 2015

Yes, my mistake.

May 30, 2015

I don't think the rich residents of Rancho Santa Fe would agree with you.

May 25, 2015

Rancho Santa Fe is relatively far so I don't think they give a rats ass about Carmel Valley. However, I do agree with your comment.

May 30, 2015

dwbat: Re; your " rich residents" comment . I feel as if I'm projecting wealth via my Zip Code. I live in a building with seven (7) other family units, but I do have a carport. We call them Condos up here in the Valley. I think you use the same term in your neck of the woods, would that be a correct assumption?

May 30, 2015

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