Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

The Carmel Valley battle for square footage

L.A.-based Kilroy Realty sues SD for illegally giving away easements

Architect's rendering of the Kilroy project in Carmel Valley
Architect's rendering of the Kilroy project in Carmel Valley

The bell has sounded in a heavyweight battle between two Carmel Valley developers and the City is caught in the middle of it all.

Kilroy Realty, the Los Angeles–based developer of the massive One Paseo project filed suit on May 28 against the city and the owner of the large shopping center across the street for sidestepping environmental review on an upcoming expansion project, one which could potentially impact the approval of One Paseo.

The lawsuit brings more controversy to what was once a sleepy affluent suburb of San Diego. The community awoke in 2012 when Kilroy Realty announced its plans to build a 1.4-million-square-foot mixed-use development proposal on a 23-acre plot located at the corner of Del Mar Heights Road and El Camino Real.

The project was met with opposition from residents who say it is way too large for the community. Residents weren't the only parties opposed to One Paseo. The owner of the Del Mar Highlands Shopping Center has also come out against the project, hiring lobbyists to dissuade councilmembers from approving the project.

Now, in the latest development, Kilroy is striking back. According to the complaint, Del Mar Highlands is attempting to piecemeal approvals on a 150,000 square-foot expansion project of their own and the city is going along with it.

The shopping-center owner is doing so by asking the city to approve small changes; for instance, granting a 24-foot sewer easement before applying for the larger expansion project.

"Despite the limited project description in the [notice of exemption], it is common knowledge within the Carmel Valley community, the Carmel Valley Planning Board, and amongst City staff that the proposed easement vacation is part of a much larger and more extensive project proposed by Real Party — the expansion of the Del Mar Highlands Town Center (the "Expansion Project"). The easement vacation is not a stand-alone item and has no purpose except to pave the way for Expansion Project….

“According to the Council Action Executive Summary Sheet, the ‘public will benefit from the vacation through the improved utilization of the land in that the owners of the property may redevelop the shopping center in the future where currently, the site is constrained due to the existence of the easement.’”

Attorneys for Kilroy argue that giving away easements can only be accomplished through a discretionary process, meaning that council, not city staff, would have to make the final decision.

City staff and the city attorney's office say differently. They say that because there has been no application turned in for the expansion project that they must decide only on the issues presented to them.

"The scope of the project that was submitted for staff review was limited to the water and sewer easement vacation, so that is what we evaluated," reads a memo from city staff that was quoted in the lawsuit. "That type of project falls within the category of minor alteration and land use limitations, which is a Class 5 Categorical Exemption from CEQA. So we based our determination on the project, the scope of the project that was submitted to us.”

The city attorney later agreed with that assessment:” We believe that the case law suggests that where there is no pending project or application for a project as we understand from staff is the case here, that the categorical exemption is proper."

Of course, giving away easements has gotten the city in trouble before. The city and developer Sunroad are currently fighting a lawsuit over two nine-foot open-space easements the city council granted for the Sunroad Centrum project. The decision was vetoed by then-mayor Bob Filner. The veto was later withdrawn after Sunroad agreed to give $100,000 to two of Filner's pet projects. Controversy ensued.

Kilroy is asking that the city take back the easements and conduct adequate environmental review.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

North River Farms foes face lawsuit heat

If activists take Measure L off ballot, they would no longer face mounting legal fees
Next Article

Dennis Caco's Mission Valley missing Midori

Max Boost creator finds car near Sweetwater Road
Architect's rendering of the Kilroy project in Carmel Valley
Architect's rendering of the Kilroy project in Carmel Valley

The bell has sounded in a heavyweight battle between two Carmel Valley developers and the City is caught in the middle of it all.

Kilroy Realty, the Los Angeles–based developer of the massive One Paseo project filed suit on May 28 against the city and the owner of the large shopping center across the street for sidestepping environmental review on an upcoming expansion project, one which could potentially impact the approval of One Paseo.

The lawsuit brings more controversy to what was once a sleepy affluent suburb of San Diego. The community awoke in 2012 when Kilroy Realty announced its plans to build a 1.4-million-square-foot mixed-use development proposal on a 23-acre plot located at the corner of Del Mar Heights Road and El Camino Real.

The project was met with opposition from residents who say it is way too large for the community. Residents weren't the only parties opposed to One Paseo. The owner of the Del Mar Highlands Shopping Center has also come out against the project, hiring lobbyists to dissuade councilmembers from approving the project.

Now, in the latest development, Kilroy is striking back. According to the complaint, Del Mar Highlands is attempting to piecemeal approvals on a 150,000 square-foot expansion project of their own and the city is going along with it.

The shopping-center owner is doing so by asking the city to approve small changes; for instance, granting a 24-foot sewer easement before applying for the larger expansion project.

"Despite the limited project description in the [notice of exemption], it is common knowledge within the Carmel Valley community, the Carmel Valley Planning Board, and amongst City staff that the proposed easement vacation is part of a much larger and more extensive project proposed by Real Party — the expansion of the Del Mar Highlands Town Center (the "Expansion Project"). The easement vacation is not a stand-alone item and has no purpose except to pave the way for Expansion Project….

“According to the Council Action Executive Summary Sheet, the ‘public will benefit from the vacation through the improved utilization of the land in that the owners of the property may redevelop the shopping center in the future where currently, the site is constrained due to the existence of the easement.’”

Attorneys for Kilroy argue that giving away easements can only be accomplished through a discretionary process, meaning that council, not city staff, would have to make the final decision.

City staff and the city attorney's office say differently. They say that because there has been no application turned in for the expansion project that they must decide only on the issues presented to them.

"The scope of the project that was submitted for staff review was limited to the water and sewer easement vacation, so that is what we evaluated," reads a memo from city staff that was quoted in the lawsuit. "That type of project falls within the category of minor alteration and land use limitations, which is a Class 5 Categorical Exemption from CEQA. So we based our determination on the project, the scope of the project that was submitted to us.”

The city attorney later agreed with that assessment:” We believe that the case law suggests that where there is no pending project or application for a project as we understand from staff is the case here, that the categorical exemption is proper."

Of course, giving away easements has gotten the city in trouble before. The city and developer Sunroad are currently fighting a lawsuit over two nine-foot open-space easements the city council granted for the Sunroad Centrum project. The decision was vetoed by then-mayor Bob Filner. The veto was later withdrawn after Sunroad agreed to give $100,000 to two of Filner's pet projects. Controversy ensued.

Kilroy is asking that the city take back the easements and conduct adequate environmental review.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Morgan Freeman as an extraterrestrial diplomat

You know the aliens have seen The Shawshank Redemption
Next Article

Alcaeus: Greek poet from the island of Lesbos

One of the Nine Lyric Poets of Greece
Comments
3

Good summary of the latest episode of America's Worst City. Thanks to the Reader for keeping us informed.

May 29, 2014

The developer didn't like the thought of competition next to their center so they spent a lot money to lobby our politicians to oppose another project. Now they put forth an expansion plan with some fine print hoping to "piece meal" approvals. First lobbyists and now lumping improvements together without any formal review of potential impacts and approval from the community? Thank you for reminding us about the Sunroad project.

May 30, 2014

First, it is completely unbelievable that the City Council and the City Attorney were unaware that a project is pending. The Del Mar Highlands expansion was discussed in a local paper on April 10th, well ahead of the council’s April 22nd vote. Also, I know from a neighbor that he signed a letter objecting to the easement, noting its nexus to the project, that was delivered to city officials on April 21st. Even without an official submission from an applicant, our representatives had enough information to – at the very least! – insist on a continuance of the agenda item with a direction to staff to investigate.

Most important to me, however, is that the easement’s disconnected approval means we residents are denied environmental protections. These are some of our most important tools for ensuring that big developers can’t harm our quality of life. We should hold developers to the highest standards for protecting our precious and easily-harmed air, land, and water resources. I don’t appreciate slick tactics to get around CEQA. We should be embracing CEQA protections, not bypassing them.

And, finally, the necessity for an exhaustive traffic review that should not be ignored. Why does the Highlands property owner get a pass? Traffic is crazy around here. We should insist on a thorough analysis.

High-dollar lobbyists and easement givaways? This whole thing stinks. I hope the Del Mar Highlands expansion is stopped until they too must comply with environmental laws. I’m glad someone is trying to right this wrong. I don’t care who it is.

June 2, 2014

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close