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One Paseo pissing match

Residents' group addresses developer's claims as council vote nears

Developer's concept illustration
Developer's concept illustration

In the weeks leading up to city council's final vote, Los Angeles–based heavyweight developer Kilroy Realty will continue to lobby hard for their proposed mixed-used development One Paseo.

To help push through the 1.5-million-square-foot development at the corner of Del Mar Heights Road and El Camino Real, Kilroy Realty has spent millions on campaign contributions, influential city lobbyists, public relations firms, and on trying to shape the debate at the community level by throwing pizza parties for supporters who agreed to show their support at community planning-group hearings.

As reported by the Reader, the developer paid outside public relations firms that specialize in devising fake-grassroots campaigns in hopes of making “NIMBYs and naysayers irrelevant.

Gearing up for an upcoming city council vote, Kilroy has taken a new tack. As reported by the Reader's Matt Potter, on December 30, Kilroy Realty formed its own political action committee called Citizens for a Business Friendly San Diego. According to a statement filed with the city clerk's office, their mission is to "support candidates to foster San Diego business investment."

Robert Little, vice president of development for Kilroy, is listed as one of the committee's principal officers.

Fighting the project is a group of Carmel Valley residents who feel the massive mixed-use project is too large for their community. Over the course of the past few years, the members of At What Price Main Street have created a website, passed out pamphlets at supermarkets, and attended planning-group meetings to try and scale back the proposal.

Last month, members of the residents’ group launched a new campaign called "Just the Facts." The campaign consists of a series of emails debunking claims made by Kilroy Realty in trying to get the development approved.

So far, the group has challenged Kilroy's claims that the development is a bike- and pedestrian-friendly development.

"One Paseo is NOT smart growth development," reads a December 31 installment of Just the Facts. "Smart growth projects are designed to minimize car usage and promote bicycling, walking and transit in the community. One Paseo does none of these."

The group has also attacked claims made regarding the amount of open space to be included in the project as well as claims that the development fits the tenets of Carmel Valley's community plan.

The influx of money and city-hall lobbying has yet to pay off for Kilroy and the underdog residents appear to have gotten the better of the exchange. In September 2013, the Carmel Valley Planning Group voted to reject Kilroy's proposal. The following month, on October 16, city planning commissioners recommended that changes be made before final approval. However, the final decision will be made by the city council, expected to vote on the proposal in the coming month.

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Developer's concept illustration
Developer's concept illustration

In the weeks leading up to city council's final vote, Los Angeles–based heavyweight developer Kilroy Realty will continue to lobby hard for their proposed mixed-used development One Paseo.

To help push through the 1.5-million-square-foot development at the corner of Del Mar Heights Road and El Camino Real, Kilroy Realty has spent millions on campaign contributions, influential city lobbyists, public relations firms, and on trying to shape the debate at the community level by throwing pizza parties for supporters who agreed to show their support at community planning-group hearings.

As reported by the Reader, the developer paid outside public relations firms that specialize in devising fake-grassroots campaigns in hopes of making “NIMBYs and naysayers irrelevant.

Gearing up for an upcoming city council vote, Kilroy has taken a new tack. As reported by the Reader's Matt Potter, on December 30, Kilroy Realty formed its own political action committee called Citizens for a Business Friendly San Diego. According to a statement filed with the city clerk's office, their mission is to "support candidates to foster San Diego business investment."

Robert Little, vice president of development for Kilroy, is listed as one of the committee's principal officers.

Fighting the project is a group of Carmel Valley residents who feel the massive mixed-use project is too large for their community. Over the course of the past few years, the members of At What Price Main Street have created a website, passed out pamphlets at supermarkets, and attended planning-group meetings to try and scale back the proposal.

Last month, members of the residents’ group launched a new campaign called "Just the Facts." The campaign consists of a series of emails debunking claims made by Kilroy Realty in trying to get the development approved.

So far, the group has challenged Kilroy's claims that the development is a bike- and pedestrian-friendly development.

"One Paseo is NOT smart growth development," reads a December 31 installment of Just the Facts. "Smart growth projects are designed to minimize car usage and promote bicycling, walking and transit in the community. One Paseo does none of these."

The group has also attacked claims made regarding the amount of open space to be included in the project as well as claims that the development fits the tenets of Carmel Valley's community plan.

The influx of money and city-hall lobbying has yet to pay off for Kilroy and the underdog residents appear to have gotten the better of the exchange. In September 2013, the Carmel Valley Planning Group voted to reject Kilroy's proposal. The following month, on October 16, city planning commissioners recommended that changes be made before final approval. However, the final decision will be made by the city council, expected to vote on the proposal in the coming month.

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Comments
4

Maybe Kilroy should hire the folks that seem to have little trouble getting Walmart sites

Jan. 4, 2015

VOSD is nothing more than a very well funded Propaganda PR machine that promotes for all those (like Kilroy) that want to profit from yet more HIGH DENSITY land development, which will keep lowering the quality of life for the majority of those living in San Diego that are not Wealthy, which is why areas like Rancho Santa Fe will never be over developed! They pick their land development targets so as not to upset those that can afford to hire expensive lawyers in order to ty them up in court.

The San Diego Reader is the only media outlet in San Diego that actually calls out those that seek to make living in San Diego ever more expensive so that the Wealthy can continue to seek short term profits for themselves and their monied investors.

Example: Our elected officials (and almost all local media) are all saying nothing about the San Onofre multi-billion dollar CPUC ripoff of southern California ratepayers which will cost every electric meter account owner about a $1000, because the Utilities donate massive amounts of money, which they get from us thanks to ever increasing Utility bills OK'd by the CPUC.

Some of the above also posted at: http://www.sandiegoreader.com/news/2015/jan/02/ticker-kilroys-still-here-promising-campaign-juice/?c=180916

Jan. 4, 2015

A pattern often followed in these development proposals is for the developer to propose far more than it expects to ever get. So, propose it taller, more dense, more traffic generating and generally more obtrusive than you really would want. Then when the NIMBY's get to work, you can "compromise" with them on the details, and overcome part of their valid objections. The locals go away, if not satisfied, at least mollified, and the developer gets what it hoped for in the first place. Does this process have a cost? Yes, it adds years to the developer's timeline, but it usually works and informed developers have built the added years into their calculations.

This proposal does not seem to be fitting into that pattern at all. For Kilroy it seems to be "all or nothing; take it or leave it." Perhaps that has worked for them in other areas of the state (LA?) and they think it will win here. And Kilroy could be right, but with the current make-up of the city council, I'm skeptical. But let nobody forget the loud voice that money brings to the process, and be aware that Kilroy has a great deal riding on that approval.

Jan. 7, 2015

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4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
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