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Some Point Loma streets fixed, others ignored

Dupont between Gage and Silvergate you'll see a lot of new ditches

More than a few who live in Point Loma are fed up with the nonsensical way some streets and alleys in the wooded area paved while others remain ignored.

One example is the Chatsworth alley between Poe Street and Wawona Drive

No curb

“I could use some suggestions on how to get the city to fix our unpaved alley. Our garage is off of this alley, my car is getting destroyed trying to access the garage, and my husband’s car cannot even attempt the journey,” said the Point Loma local. “Every ‘Get it Done’ ticket we submit is closed within hours without help… we’ve lived here almost eight years, and the city usually fills this in and works on it every 18-24 months. The city trash truck is upset with us telling us their truck will hit our retaining wall if we don’t have it fixed. The drop from our driveway is now 1.5-2 ft.”

After another Get it Done request, repairs were made mid-January 2020, but the repairs washed out after the first rain.

While driving down Charles Street, in the alley between Catalina Boulevard and Silvergate Avenue, I find John who has lived in the area for 40 years. Noticing that the first half of the alley was paved, and the other half gravel, I asked if he knew anything about it.

Chatsworth alley. "The drop from our driveway is now 1.5-2 ft.”

“I would say this was paved approximately a year ago, but yeah, we were hoping they’d pave the whole alley but for some reason they chose to stop there,” John explains. “I think this half of the alley was unpaved before so maybe they just re-did that? And the other reason we thought they might pave the whole alley is because trash trucks go down these alleys too; we thought they’d want a better surface.”

A woman who lives on Warner Street wondered why her street remained unpaved, while Dudley Street, one block over, was recently paved.

"The ditches make it so people can't park in certain spots."

“It just doesn’t make any sense how they chose which ones to repair, it’s such a mash-up, I don’t know, its frustrating for sure.”

‘Sue’ walks the streets daily and has been sending emails to the City since 2017.

“If you walk down Dupont between Gage and Silvergate you'll see a lot of new ditches. I have a baby stroller and it's impossible to walk without driving through all these ditches. You definitely need a heavy-duty stroller in this neighborhood. There is a huge ditch in front of my neighbor’s house that could take out the front end of a car. It's right where people need to park. And parking away from the ditch blocks the city street. Parking in the ditch now puts you up on their lawn. I've been emailing the city streets division, and reporting via the Get it Done app since 2017. I had one conversation with the street division which was circuitous, and eventually just ended despite me following up a few times.

"When I had my baby (March 2019) I tried one more time to get the neighbor's ditch filled and report the rest of the streets, but again it went nowhere, so I had to give up. If the ditches were filled it would be safer, and there would be more parking. Charles Street parking (at the Catalina end) is terrible. And the ditches make it so people can't park in certain spots, so they end up parking in front of neighbors’ houses and then neighbors can't park. These are all multi-million dollar houses on this street, but we've got 2-4-feet ditches in front of some? The residents on this street are paying the same taxes as the residents one street over, yet those residents get a safe neighborhood street to drive on?”

Earlier this month, in response to her emails, Joshua Coyne, policy advisor for Councilmember Jennifer Campbell told her that there’s a long history of unimproved streets within the city, including Council Policy 200-03.

“Come to find out my street is considered an ‘unimproved street,’ the asphalt went down in 1950 and will never be touched again and therefore will never ever be paved or patched – ever – unless neighbors want to pay to upgrade the street with curbs, lights, sidewalks – then the street could be repaired.”

Jordan Beane, director of communications for Campbell, told me:

“For almost 3 years a water and sewer line replacement project has been on-going on a select number of streets in the La Playa/Wooded Area Point Loma neighborhoods. Our office recently learned that underground work has been completed and road resurfacing would commence.

"We have been working closely with the mayor’s office and city staff to communicate with residents the impacts on street parking and resurfacing timeline. It is our understanding that all roads impacted by this project will be resurfaced in February 2020.

"Towards the end of 2019, our office learned that a number of the streets impacted by this project were on what the city considers an 'unimproved street' according to council policy.

"Roads that are 'unimproved' require modifications (curb cuts, street lights, etc.) to be in compliance with the municipal code before they qualify for street improvement funding. We are working to schedule a meeting with the Department of Transportation and Stormwater to discuss ‘unimproved streets’ in District 2. We expect to follow up with the community after that meeting occurs.“

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12

No curb and unpaved alleys doesn't make any sense. Point Loma is a nice area. Give the taxpayers their monies worth.

Feb. 3, 2020

In most cases the predecessor owners CHOSE to have and keep the streets UNIMPROVED. There were a few factors: traffic, parking and most of all taxes. You see most, but certainly not all, of the Wooded Areas unimproved streets have larger than average lots and larger than average homes built on them. Thus they had and have larger than average tax bills. To combat the growing tax burden the owners elected not to have the streets improved some 60-70 years ago. But there are exceptions. For example Dudley is improved but adjacent streets, Charles and Warner are not. Dudley was recently resurfaced, the others were not. If those who say their streets should be resurfaced then they need to pony up the costs they and predecessor owners avoided. The trick, of course, is getting all of the residents on a block to agree. It's like hearding cats, but as these cowboys know, rewarding.... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pk7yqlTMvp8

Feb. 3, 2020

Getting all the neighbors to agree has as much chance as turning lead into gold. They all think the City should pay.

Feb. 5, 2020
This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.
Feb. 4, 2020

We don't live in Point Loma, but the city should pay. How many of us have ever paid to have sidewalks put in or alleys paved. I certainly haven't, nor would I. That's what my TAXPAYER dollars are for. Current homeowners shouldn't be punished for decisions of previous homeowners 70 years ago - if that really is the reason.

Feb. 5, 2020

From an article regarding unimproved streets in 2012. This isn’t a new issue.

City of San Diego Council Policy 200-03, from 1974 says, “there are approximately 53 miles of unimproved streets in use and a sizeable portion of this inventory provides access to property in the urbanized areas. In addition, there are many more miles of street where existing improvements are not up to modern standards. These streets are in areas that were subdivided many years ago before street improvements were required in connection with subdivision development.”

Santacroce added that “the City’s resurfacing program is limited to improved streets and partially improved streets … the responsibility to improve the road belongs to the adjacent property owners. Once a public street or alley is improved to current standards, the City will maintain it to the same standard as other streets within the improved street network, given available funding. The City does provide minor pavement repair for unimproved roads and alleys, such as pothole repair and hazardous patching to make them passable for vehicular traffic.”

Read the policy yourself.... https://docs.sandiego.gov/councilpolicies/cpd_200-03.pdf

Feb. 5, 2020

I did read the policy. "However, in the majority of cases, the greatest deterrent to the assessment district approach has been low property valuations and the problems created for owners with low incomes in paying off assessment bonds."

When I think of low property values and low income, I don't think of Point Loma residents. Were they even referring to Point Loma streets?

Feb. 6, 2020

Amazing to see these photos of even an alleyway anyplace in San Diego. Looks like Appalachia. I invite the readers of this article to drive on Scripps Trail in Scripps Ranch if they want to see an assortment of pot holes, missing chunks of asphalt and dips for this street that has not had a major repair since it was built in 1982. Now that's our tax dollars NOT at work! The Mayor claims 50% of the potholes in San Diego have been repaired? Scripps Trail is the 50% that has not. Even the pot hole crews that show up every few years have commented in what poor condition the street is in.

Feb. 5, 2020

Ah the joy of living in the Peoples Republic of San Diego.

Feb. 6, 2020

The policy refers to 53 miles of streets all over the urban areas of the city. The reality is homeowners living on these unimproved or partially improved streets don’t want to pay 50% of the cost to bring the street up to city standards. In fact, the Wooded area with their partially improved streets has used them as a selling point regarding the character of the neighborhood. Taxpayer dollar are used to maintain improved streets. Developers pay to build streets in the first place and recover their costs when selling lots and homes. But these streets were never built to city standards in the first place. But now some complain as the unimproved streets are worse as the city has been replacing water and sewer lines. Seems some are never happy and believe they are entitled even though the initial development chose not to improve the streets.

Feb. 6, 2020

Join the crowd - innumerable number of streets in San Diego that need re-paving. For instance, all of the 3 miles of Clairemont Mesa Blvd. from the 805 to the 15 is in dire need of re-paving. This is where the transportation tax money should go, instead of multi billion dollar boondoggles like the blue line extension that very few people will use. We're a country of DRIVERS!!! You drive a car in the USA because that is the only PRACTICAL way to get somewhere.

Feb. 16, 2020
This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.
March 7, 2020

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The unpaved alley
The unpaved alley

More than a few who live in Point Loma are fed up with the nonsensical way some streets and alleys in the wooded area paved while others remain ignored.

One example is the Chatsworth alley between Poe Street and Wawona Drive

No curb

“I could use some suggestions on how to get the city to fix our unpaved alley. Our garage is off of this alley, my car is getting destroyed trying to access the garage, and my husband’s car cannot even attempt the journey,” said the Point Loma local. “Every ‘Get it Done’ ticket we submit is closed within hours without help… we’ve lived here almost eight years, and the city usually fills this in and works on it every 18-24 months. The city trash truck is upset with us telling us their truck will hit our retaining wall if we don’t have it fixed. The drop from our driveway is now 1.5-2 ft.”

After another Get it Done request, repairs were made mid-January 2020, but the repairs washed out after the first rain.

While driving down Charles Street, in the alley between Catalina Boulevard and Silvergate Avenue, I find John who has lived in the area for 40 years. Noticing that the first half of the alley was paved, and the other half gravel, I asked if he knew anything about it.

Chatsworth alley. "The drop from our driveway is now 1.5-2 ft.”

“I would say this was paved approximately a year ago, but yeah, we were hoping they’d pave the whole alley but for some reason they chose to stop there,” John explains. “I think this half of the alley was unpaved before so maybe they just re-did that? And the other reason we thought they might pave the whole alley is because trash trucks go down these alleys too; we thought they’d want a better surface.”

A woman who lives on Warner Street wondered why her street remained unpaved, while Dudley Street, one block over, was recently paved.

"The ditches make it so people can't park in certain spots."

“It just doesn’t make any sense how they chose which ones to repair, it’s such a mash-up, I don’t know, its frustrating for sure.”

‘Sue’ walks the streets daily and has been sending emails to the City since 2017.

“If you walk down Dupont between Gage and Silvergate you'll see a lot of new ditches. I have a baby stroller and it's impossible to walk without driving through all these ditches. You definitely need a heavy-duty stroller in this neighborhood. There is a huge ditch in front of my neighbor’s house that could take out the front end of a car. It's right where people need to park. And parking away from the ditch blocks the city street. Parking in the ditch now puts you up on their lawn. I've been emailing the city streets division, and reporting via the Get it Done app since 2017. I had one conversation with the street division which was circuitous, and eventually just ended despite me following up a few times.

"When I had my baby (March 2019) I tried one more time to get the neighbor's ditch filled and report the rest of the streets, but again it went nowhere, so I had to give up. If the ditches were filled it would be safer, and there would be more parking. Charles Street parking (at the Catalina end) is terrible. And the ditches make it so people can't park in certain spots, so they end up parking in front of neighbors’ houses and then neighbors can't park. These are all multi-million dollar houses on this street, but we've got 2-4-feet ditches in front of some? The residents on this street are paying the same taxes as the residents one street over, yet those residents get a safe neighborhood street to drive on?”

Earlier this month, in response to her emails, Joshua Coyne, policy advisor for Councilmember Jennifer Campbell told her that there’s a long history of unimproved streets within the city, including Council Policy 200-03.

“Come to find out my street is considered an ‘unimproved street,’ the asphalt went down in 1950 and will never be touched again and therefore will never ever be paved or patched – ever – unless neighbors want to pay to upgrade the street with curbs, lights, sidewalks – then the street could be repaired.”

Jordan Beane, director of communications for Campbell, told me:

“For almost 3 years a water and sewer line replacement project has been on-going on a select number of streets in the La Playa/Wooded Area Point Loma neighborhoods. Our office recently learned that underground work has been completed and road resurfacing would commence.

"We have been working closely with the mayor’s office and city staff to communicate with residents the impacts on street parking and resurfacing timeline. It is our understanding that all roads impacted by this project will be resurfaced in February 2020.

"Towards the end of 2019, our office learned that a number of the streets impacted by this project were on what the city considers an 'unimproved street' according to council policy.

"Roads that are 'unimproved' require modifications (curb cuts, street lights, etc.) to be in compliance with the municipal code before they qualify for street improvement funding. We are working to schedule a meeting with the Department of Transportation and Stormwater to discuss ‘unimproved streets’ in District 2. We expect to follow up with the community after that meeting occurs.“

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Comments
12

No curb and unpaved alleys doesn't make any sense. Point Loma is a nice area. Give the taxpayers their monies worth.

Feb. 3, 2020

In most cases the predecessor owners CHOSE to have and keep the streets UNIMPROVED. There were a few factors: traffic, parking and most of all taxes. You see most, but certainly not all, of the Wooded Areas unimproved streets have larger than average lots and larger than average homes built on them. Thus they had and have larger than average tax bills. To combat the growing tax burden the owners elected not to have the streets improved some 60-70 years ago. But there are exceptions. For example Dudley is improved but adjacent streets, Charles and Warner are not. Dudley was recently resurfaced, the others were not. If those who say their streets should be resurfaced then they need to pony up the costs they and predecessor owners avoided. The trick, of course, is getting all of the residents on a block to agree. It's like hearding cats, but as these cowboys know, rewarding.... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pk7yqlTMvp8

Feb. 3, 2020

Getting all the neighbors to agree has as much chance as turning lead into gold. They all think the City should pay.

Feb. 5, 2020
This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.
Feb. 4, 2020

We don't live in Point Loma, but the city should pay. How many of us have ever paid to have sidewalks put in or alleys paved. I certainly haven't, nor would I. That's what my TAXPAYER dollars are for. Current homeowners shouldn't be punished for decisions of previous homeowners 70 years ago - if that really is the reason.

Feb. 5, 2020

From an article regarding unimproved streets in 2012. This isn’t a new issue.

City of San Diego Council Policy 200-03, from 1974 says, “there are approximately 53 miles of unimproved streets in use and a sizeable portion of this inventory provides access to property in the urbanized areas. In addition, there are many more miles of street where existing improvements are not up to modern standards. These streets are in areas that were subdivided many years ago before street improvements were required in connection with subdivision development.”

Santacroce added that “the City’s resurfacing program is limited to improved streets and partially improved streets … the responsibility to improve the road belongs to the adjacent property owners. Once a public street or alley is improved to current standards, the City will maintain it to the same standard as other streets within the improved street network, given available funding. The City does provide minor pavement repair for unimproved roads and alleys, such as pothole repair and hazardous patching to make them passable for vehicular traffic.”

Read the policy yourself.... https://docs.sandiego.gov/councilpolicies/cpd_200-03.pdf

Feb. 5, 2020

I did read the policy. "However, in the majority of cases, the greatest deterrent to the assessment district approach has been low property valuations and the problems created for owners with low incomes in paying off assessment bonds."

When I think of low property values and low income, I don't think of Point Loma residents. Were they even referring to Point Loma streets?

Feb. 6, 2020

Amazing to see these photos of even an alleyway anyplace in San Diego. Looks like Appalachia. I invite the readers of this article to drive on Scripps Trail in Scripps Ranch if they want to see an assortment of pot holes, missing chunks of asphalt and dips for this street that has not had a major repair since it was built in 1982. Now that's our tax dollars NOT at work! The Mayor claims 50% of the potholes in San Diego have been repaired? Scripps Trail is the 50% that has not. Even the pot hole crews that show up every few years have commented in what poor condition the street is in.

Feb. 5, 2020

Ah the joy of living in the Peoples Republic of San Diego.

Feb. 6, 2020

The policy refers to 53 miles of streets all over the urban areas of the city. The reality is homeowners living on these unimproved or partially improved streets don’t want to pay 50% of the cost to bring the street up to city standards. In fact, the Wooded area with their partially improved streets has used them as a selling point regarding the character of the neighborhood. Taxpayer dollar are used to maintain improved streets. Developers pay to build streets in the first place and recover their costs when selling lots and homes. But these streets were never built to city standards in the first place. But now some complain as the unimproved streets are worse as the city has been replacing water and sewer lines. Seems some are never happy and believe they are entitled even though the initial development chose not to improve the streets.

Feb. 6, 2020

Join the crowd - innumerable number of streets in San Diego that need re-paving. For instance, all of the 3 miles of Clairemont Mesa Blvd. from the 805 to the 15 is in dire need of re-paving. This is where the transportation tax money should go, instead of multi billion dollar boondoggles like the blue line extension that very few people will use. We're a country of DRIVERS!!! You drive a car in the USA because that is the only PRACTICAL way to get somewhere.

Feb. 16, 2020
This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.
March 7, 2020

Sign in to comment

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