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U.S. passport now required to fish coastal Mexico

The Coronado Islands. You will need a passport to fish there from now on, even from vessels departing from US waters.
The Coronado Islands. You will need a passport to fish there from now on, even from vessels departing from US waters.

The San Diego sportfishing fleet has made some adjustments in their fishing areas due to a new requirement for all anglers south of the border and within 12 miles of the Mexican coast to posses a passport. This includes those fishing aboard vessels departing from U.S. waters. To give folks some time to comply, the boats have shifted outside that area for a bit.

As there is a no-take in Mexico for bluefin tuna that are also being caught north of the border where 2 can be kept and the yellowtail fishing has turned on off La Jolla, this has not been a totally devastating blow to the fleet. The worst hit are the 3/4 day and overnight boats concentrating on the Coronado Islands and the Baja coast within the 12 mile limit.

May 29 dock totals

The Chubasco II 1/2 day am run with 25 anglers aboard returned to the dock with 31 yellowtail and 1 calico bass in the sacks.

13 anglers aboard the Dolphin 1/2 day am run caught 2 sculpin, 66 rockfish and 2 calico bass. Their pm 1/2 day run, again with 13 anglers at the rail, reported 3 sculpin, 49 rockfish and 3 calico bass caught. There were 110 calico bass caught and released between both trips.

The Fisherman III 3/4 day run with 17 anglers aboard called in a total catch of 7 sand bass, 5 rockfish and 28 yellowtail.

The Legend overnight trip with 31 anglers aboard reported 1 bluefin tuna and 5 bonito caught.

4 anglers aboard the Penetrator 1/2 day pm run boated 16 yellowtail.

Old Glory on an overnight trip with 15 anglers aboard returned to the dock with 75 calico bass, 12 sheephead, 60 rockfish, 2 sculpin, 3 lingcod, 10 bonito and 5 yellowtail in the hold.

18 anglers aboard the Malihini 3/4 day run caught 5 yellowtail, 8 bonito and 1 bluefin tuna.

The Sea Trek out of Oceanside with 18 anglers aboard for a 3/4 day run reported 5 yellowtail caught. 4 of the fish were released.

22 anglers aboard the Daily Double 1/2 day am run boated 49 rockfish. Their pm 1/2 run with 18 anglers at the rail called in with 32 rockfish, 1 lingcod and 55 calico bass caught, with 50 of the bass released.

The New Seaforth 1/2 day am run carrying 63 anglers out to the local kelp reported 10 yellowtail, 5 rockfish, 1 lingcod and 10 calico bass caught. 75 anglers aboard their pm 1/2 day run boated 12 yellowtail, 1 lingcod, 2 halibut.

1 yellowfin tuna, 3 bonito and 7 bluefin tuna were caught on the San Diego 3/4 day run with 34 anglers aboard.

2 anglers aboard El Gato Dos on a 3/4 day trip boated 3 yellowtail, 4 rockfish, and 3 bonito. Only 1 bluefin tuna for the 5 anglers aboard the Alexes 3/4 day trip. That's why it's called "fishing" and not "catching".

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Comments
7

If Frank Trousdale is correct, then he has answered a question that the poster didn't answer. Why would Mexico insist upon a passport? If I'm not mistaken, we can still visit Mexico for short stays and day trips without needing a passport to satisfy the Mexicans or the US border authorities. My take would be that Mexico wants to keep the US boats out of their waters so that they can grab the business for their own boats.

May 31, 2015

You have to stay in the Mexico border zone, and stay less than 72 hours, if you want back in the U.S. without a passport. If you go into the interior of Mexico and for several days, you BETTER have a passport if you want to come back across the border. Why would anyone even want to enter Mexico? Stay home, people, and avoid the stress (and possible danger) of entering a Third World nation.

May 31, 2015

The U.S. Department of State: All adults arriving by land from Canada or Mexico must have a passport.

The subject of the passport requirement for fishing within their 12 miles of their coast is not new. The Mexican government has been lenient about issuing the visa (or Mexican tourist cards) to those fishing in territorial waters. Mexico had been accepting state ID's and other identification such as birth certificates and such rather than insisting on a passport. So Mexico is now enforcing a law already on their books. Of course with popular fishing spots around the Coronado Islands, the 12-mile territory radiates out into waters further from the mainland.

May 31, 2015

The need for a passport at these border cities is a debated topic. I hear some people get across with valid ID's and an understanding agent. While others get stranded in Mexico because they do not have a passport and much hassle is created contacting the consulate so they can return home.

Bottom line is you do not want to have an accident in Mexico or any legal problems and not be carrying a valid U.S. passport. The world has changed and the $100 (or whatever it is these days) to procure a passport is worth it if you plan to leave the country.

May 31, 2015

So, you're saying that a short dash across the border to shop in Tecate could result in being denied reentry to the US, even for a native-born US citizen, such as myself? Wow. I didn't think it had gone that far. As it is, I haven't ventured across that imaginary line in the dirt for at least a decade, and don't plan to do so.

May 31, 2015

Hi Visduh. I am not an authority on the subject and cannot confirm that you must have a passport. Like I said, it's a debated topic. I understand from hearsay that crossing without a passport (these days) happens but it depends on the agent you meet when crossing. The way you are put together, your dress, your attitude... you "can" cross -- if he or she is inclined to permit to let you enter the U.S., but official policy is that you must have a passport. Hearsay aside, I have also heard horror stories of stranded Americans and other nationals who have crossed the border without passports.

The land crossing law was extended for one year back in 2008. The official rule is that as of January 1, 2009 anyone wishing to cross the border from Mexico by land must have a valid U.S. passport.

So in the context of this story, it is Mexico that is enforcing their laws on obtaining a visa and their laws have for years required a passport. But Baja has been happy to let sportsfishing operators to handle issuing the visas to their customers... and now the government of Mexico wants the passport to issue a visa. What triggered that move from laissez-faire enforcement to strict enforcement is the subject of debate. Even if Mexican sports fishing operators were behind it, the Americans would still need a passport. If anything it is the USDOS that will benefit with the c-notes being traded for papers.

May 31, 2015

Daniel Powell is doing a great service -- getting the word out -- by adding this story along with his sports fishing reports. Imagine a midwesterner craving an awesome fishing adventure and making all the plans, then getting to San Diego to discover he/she cannot join the fun because they don't have a passport.

May 31, 2015

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The Coronado Islands. You will need a passport to fish there from now on, even from vessels departing from US waters.
The Coronado Islands. You will need a passport to fish there from now on, even from vessels departing from US waters.

The San Diego sportfishing fleet has made some adjustments in their fishing areas due to a new requirement for all anglers south of the border and within 12 miles of the Mexican coast to posses a passport. This includes those fishing aboard vessels departing from U.S. waters. To give folks some time to comply, the boats have shifted outside that area for a bit.

As there is a no-take in Mexico for bluefin tuna that are also being caught north of the border where 2 can be kept and the yellowtail fishing has turned on off La Jolla, this has not been a totally devastating blow to the fleet. The worst hit are the 3/4 day and overnight boats concentrating on the Coronado Islands and the Baja coast within the 12 mile limit.

May 29 dock totals

The Chubasco II 1/2 day am run with 25 anglers aboard returned to the dock with 31 yellowtail and 1 calico bass in the sacks.

13 anglers aboard the Dolphin 1/2 day am run caught 2 sculpin, 66 rockfish and 2 calico bass. Their pm 1/2 day run, again with 13 anglers at the rail, reported 3 sculpin, 49 rockfish and 3 calico bass caught. There were 110 calico bass caught and released between both trips.

The Fisherman III 3/4 day run with 17 anglers aboard called in a total catch of 7 sand bass, 5 rockfish and 28 yellowtail.

The Legend overnight trip with 31 anglers aboard reported 1 bluefin tuna and 5 bonito caught.

4 anglers aboard the Penetrator 1/2 day pm run boated 16 yellowtail.

Old Glory on an overnight trip with 15 anglers aboard returned to the dock with 75 calico bass, 12 sheephead, 60 rockfish, 2 sculpin, 3 lingcod, 10 bonito and 5 yellowtail in the hold.

18 anglers aboard the Malihini 3/4 day run caught 5 yellowtail, 8 bonito and 1 bluefin tuna.

The Sea Trek out of Oceanside with 18 anglers aboard for a 3/4 day run reported 5 yellowtail caught. 4 of the fish were released.

22 anglers aboard the Daily Double 1/2 day am run boated 49 rockfish. Their pm 1/2 run with 18 anglers at the rail called in with 32 rockfish, 1 lingcod and 55 calico bass caught, with 50 of the bass released.

The New Seaforth 1/2 day am run carrying 63 anglers out to the local kelp reported 10 yellowtail, 5 rockfish, 1 lingcod and 10 calico bass caught. 75 anglers aboard their pm 1/2 day run boated 12 yellowtail, 1 lingcod, 2 halibut.

1 yellowfin tuna, 3 bonito and 7 bluefin tuna were caught on the San Diego 3/4 day run with 34 anglers aboard.

2 anglers aboard El Gato Dos on a 3/4 day trip boated 3 yellowtail, 4 rockfish, and 3 bonito. Only 1 bluefin tuna for the 5 anglers aboard the Alexes 3/4 day trip. That's why it's called "fishing" and not "catching".

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Comments
7

If Frank Trousdale is correct, then he has answered a question that the poster didn't answer. Why would Mexico insist upon a passport? If I'm not mistaken, we can still visit Mexico for short stays and day trips without needing a passport to satisfy the Mexicans or the US border authorities. My take would be that Mexico wants to keep the US boats out of their waters so that they can grab the business for their own boats.

May 31, 2015

You have to stay in the Mexico border zone, and stay less than 72 hours, if you want back in the U.S. without a passport. If you go into the interior of Mexico and for several days, you BETTER have a passport if you want to come back across the border. Why would anyone even want to enter Mexico? Stay home, people, and avoid the stress (and possible danger) of entering a Third World nation.

May 31, 2015

The U.S. Department of State: All adults arriving by land from Canada or Mexico must have a passport.

The subject of the passport requirement for fishing within their 12 miles of their coast is not new. The Mexican government has been lenient about issuing the visa (or Mexican tourist cards) to those fishing in territorial waters. Mexico had been accepting state ID's and other identification such as birth certificates and such rather than insisting on a passport. So Mexico is now enforcing a law already on their books. Of course with popular fishing spots around the Coronado Islands, the 12-mile territory radiates out into waters further from the mainland.

May 31, 2015

The need for a passport at these border cities is a debated topic. I hear some people get across with valid ID's and an understanding agent. While others get stranded in Mexico because they do not have a passport and much hassle is created contacting the consulate so they can return home.

Bottom line is you do not want to have an accident in Mexico or any legal problems and not be carrying a valid U.S. passport. The world has changed and the $100 (or whatever it is these days) to procure a passport is worth it if you plan to leave the country.

May 31, 2015

So, you're saying that a short dash across the border to shop in Tecate could result in being denied reentry to the US, even for a native-born US citizen, such as myself? Wow. I didn't think it had gone that far. As it is, I haven't ventured across that imaginary line in the dirt for at least a decade, and don't plan to do so.

May 31, 2015

Hi Visduh. I am not an authority on the subject and cannot confirm that you must have a passport. Like I said, it's a debated topic. I understand from hearsay that crossing without a passport (these days) happens but it depends on the agent you meet when crossing. The way you are put together, your dress, your attitude... you "can" cross -- if he or she is inclined to permit to let you enter the U.S., but official policy is that you must have a passport. Hearsay aside, I have also heard horror stories of stranded Americans and other nationals who have crossed the border without passports.

The land crossing law was extended for one year back in 2008. The official rule is that as of January 1, 2009 anyone wishing to cross the border from Mexico by land must have a valid U.S. passport.

So in the context of this story, it is Mexico that is enforcing their laws on obtaining a visa and their laws have for years required a passport. But Baja has been happy to let sportsfishing operators to handle issuing the visas to their customers... and now the government of Mexico wants the passport to issue a visa. What triggered that move from laissez-faire enforcement to strict enforcement is the subject of debate. Even if Mexican sports fishing operators were behind it, the Americans would still need a passport. If anything it is the USDOS that will benefit with the c-notes being traded for papers.

May 31, 2015

Daniel Powell is doing a great service -- getting the word out -- by adding this story along with his sports fishing reports. Imagine a midwesterner craving an awesome fishing adventure and making all the plans, then getting to San Diego to discover he/she cannot join the fun because they don't have a passport.

May 31, 2015

Sign in to comment

Sign in

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