4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Letters

Dave? Is That You?

I would like to comment on “Where Do They Go When the Races Are Over?” (Cover Story, July 14). First, I think society should be more evolved so that races are banned in the first place. Second, I think the working class should want to boycott the races because they are oppressed by their masters, and the lines of class division are clearly drawn at the racetrack.

Next, I would like to say that I think the rescuers who want to save the Thoroughbreds from the slaughterhouses, I hope they don’t eat meat. And finally, you mentioned that a Dave Quinn was a beneficiary of horses that end up in Phoenix. Well, actually, the leader of local band Tiltwheel, his name is Dave Quinn, and his father’s name is Dave Quinn.

Lorelei
via voice mail

Support Your Local Barn

I was so happy to see your story raising awareness for the futures of our gallant Thoroughbreds after they have given it their all (“Where Do They Go When the Races Are Over?” Cover Story, July 14). I know readers were encouraged to hear of the diminished path that led to untimely death. But readers should also be aware of the precarious position of our ranch owners. So many are operating in the red right now but subsidizing their passion in hopes that things will turn around. Many have not been able to hold on. Hay prices are astronomical. Growers that have not switched to cotton are often offered exorbitant compensation from foreign horse owners for their entire cutting. These “deals that are too good to pass up” generate supply shortages and high prices here at home. In California, especially, the worker compensation requirements are breaking the bank for owners.

What can we do to see this piece of our equestrian heritage survive? Support your local barns. If you don’t use their services yourself, be their advocate. And if you have a desire to ride, you’d be surprised how affordable it actually is to get yourself a weekly session with a trainer. As our past president said, “There’s nothing better for the inside of a man than the outside of a horse.”

Sue Hardman
via email

Good Fodder

Don Bauder’s article “What? No War?” (“City Lights,” July 14) is a good example of the practical application of Darwin. We have seen so many adaptations in the business world, like computers replacing typewriters, autos replacing the horse and buggy, science replacing religion. Darwin said that it’s not the brute strength or the IQ that wins in the long run; it’s the ability to adapt. This is a poignant application that is good fodder for the defense industry. And that gets the point across.

Ted Rodosovich
University City

Hanging On Honor

I’m calling about “City Lights” — “Thief Does His Homework,” by Eva Knott. It ends on page 50 with nothing. It just says “The Honor-” — and it doesn’t say “continued.” A very interesting story about this thief that got through the Carlsbad jewelry store and all the shenanigans for years for which he should be locked up. I mean, it’s a horrible story to read. But, please, continue it. Don’t leave us just hanging.

Name Withheld
via voice mail

The story’s last sentence was, “On June 28, the Honorable Aaron Katz sentenced Davis to 50 years to life.” — Editor

Get Streets Straight

Regarding “Lovely Newspaperman” by Gail Powell (“Stringers,” July 14). Yes, this was a tragedy, and I don’t want to minimize that. But could your stringers get the names of streets correct? There is no such street as Point Loma Boulevard. There is a Point Loma Avenue and a West Point Loma Boulevard. They are not the same street, they do not connect, and they are a mile apart at their closest point. As a Point Loma Avenue resident, I’ve gotten used to late repairmen, lost deliverymen, misdirected mail, confused houseguests, and not being able to get delivered pizzas, but I hold people who are getting paid to provide information to a higher standard. (By the way, the 7-Eleven Powell refers to is off West Point Loma Boulevard.)

Brent Bernau
via email

Craft Beers Cost!

Great article on craft beers (“Beer Heaven,” Cover Story, July 7). One thing the story failed to mention is how much more expensive they are! If I bought craft beer as often as I buy my Bud/Miller/Coors, I would be selling my house and living in a freaking trailer park. Until I win the lottery, I won’t be buying a whole lot of craft beers — just a few.

Name Withheld By Request

Tastergate

I noticed on page 28 of your latest Reader (“Beer Heaven,” Cover Story, July 7) the statement, “At $4 for 5 tasters, my choices include an ESB — “Extra Special Bitter” — an IPA, a brown, and a pilsner.”

As far as I understand, looking through the article, there are only four mentions of tasters, not five. I just thought I’d mention it. I mean, you know, I’ve nothing else better to do, reading and noticing things like that and wondering what the fifth taster was, if there was a fifth one.

Michael
via voice mail

Ed Bedford responds: Dear Michael, The Fifth Taster. Wow, what a title for a mystery novel. I know how maddening that can be, when some guy says there are five things and only mentions four. Though I did say my choices “include” ESB, etc., not “were,” probably because I just couldn’t recall. By this time, all the “research” had clouded my little memory cells till they resembled a cask ale release at Hamilton’s on a Friday night. (Murky.) Let’s see...Hmm. D’uh, oh, yes. I think it was probably a New English “Why Not? American Wheat Beer,” though wheat beers aren’t my favorite.

Too Involved

I do appreciate Gail Powell’s columns when they are related to things in our community; however, I find that the biased position she has toward Bonnie Dumanis is not acceptable in writing an objective article (“The Shame,” “Stringers,” July 7). I attended the kickoff fund-raiser, and one of the biggest protesters screaming out at San Diego Citizens was Gail. When writing about Ms. Dumanis, this should be placed under an opinion section, not under a newsworthy column. Reporters should not be personally involved in the stories when they are unable to give an unprejudiced opinion.

Name Withheld
via email

Shared The Love

Jerry, thank you for your love of San Diego County and for sharing it with us (“End of the Trail,” “Roam-O-Rama,” July 7). You are, of course, right in your assessment of the great geographical diversity of our region and how lucky we all are to be able to enjoy it, and thanks for your help in that regard. I am very sorry to hear about your illness and hope that you have been fulfilled in this life. Thanks for your good work. I will miss it.

Peace,

Stephen A. Smith
via email

Beat It

Jerry, you came to my office on Broadway (Frost House in Golden Hill) when you first got into town; I believe you were doing photography at the time (“End of the Trail,” “Roam-O-Rama,” July 7). It was a most pleasant visit as I recall, and while I regret that we never got to work together, you did quite well without my help. You have provided uncounted people much pleasure and have thus (and in other countless ways) greatly made this place and the world much, much better. Not many can say that, and even fewer than it is true for you.

Despite the state of your illness, I hope you will heal and beat it. Ask your physician about “mega” doses of vitamin D, even though, with all your time outdoors, your levels might be somewhat higher than most unless you’ve used a lot of sunscreen. There have been other recent advances in treatment, so keep on plugging and know that thousands or millions are in your corner!

Wayne Tyson
via email

Happy Trails

Dear Mr. Schad, thank you for many years of describing the beautiful areas in our county, which have guided me to places I probably would not have discovered (“End of the Trail,” “Roam-O-Rama,” July 7). Happy trails.

Kim C. Cox
via email

Star Struck

Le Quattro Volte is one of the worst movies I have ever seen in 72 years (Movie Review, June 30). For David Elliott to give it four stars is absolutely unforgivable. The movie has absolutely no script (zero). There is no acting. There is a complex array of seeing goats and a sick man eating dust that has been blessed. The cutting down of a tree and the emergence of mineral charcoal. So what if it represents four souls in different forms (human, animal, vegetable, and mineral). On-screen it has no meaning at all. It is not even a documentary. I am so sorry that people who respect the Reader to help guide them in some cases to see certain movies get duped by Elliott. Duncan Shepherd was terrible, but I thought Elliott was better. I have reviewed movies for a San Antonio Jewish magazine with respect for those individuals reading the review. I am shocked, perplexed, and very upset with Elliott’s offbeat review. We as people in San Diego deserve respect with better critique. While I agree that the Tree of Life failed, it was much better in many respects than “Four Times.” To give it one star and to give this movie four stars — people should be asking for their hard-earned money back from the Gaslamp. Not to say that Elliott should return anyone’s money back as well. Please do better, Reader, in choosing your movie critics. Sorry!

Kenneth Blum
via email

Mission Statement

Re “Why Would the FBI Give $223 Million to This Man?” (Cover Story, June 30). This incisive article represents a welcome change to including investigative journalism. You must make it a regular part of your editorial mission.

Al Rodbell
via email

We’re Two For Four

Printing the food blogs from Ed Bedford and Barbarella is a good call (July 7). From Naomi Wise and Brandon Hernandez, not so much.

Name Withheld

Goofy With No Fun

I’m disappointed in the “mind-benders” (“Brainstorms”). They’re not as humorous or fun as they used to be. It’s just goofy, stupid stuff, but it’s not fun goofy, stupid stuff. That’s all I have to say. I enjoy the Reader, and I appreciate the publication, but the puzzle is just not doing it anymore.

Ted Fabares
via voice mail

Preeminent Force Ruling Human Existence

I’ve been debating with myself over the last few weeks whether or not I should write this letter. Obviously, I outvoted myself and wrote it. I concluded I absolutely had to tell you that Ms. Barbarella’s fans accept her dim-witted warnings without question.

In the first place, what really irks me is that Barbarella has presented us with a Hobson’s choice. Either we let her apotheosize the most merciless dingbats you’ll ever see, or she’ll hasten society’s quiescence to moral pluralism and epistemological uncertainty.

I close this letter along the same lines it opened on: Ms. Barbarella’s inclinations are very much in line with wrongheaded emotionalism in that they transform fear and its inculcation into the preeminent force ruling human existence.

The Epic Gnar
via email

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Dave? Is That You?

I would like to comment on “Where Do They Go When the Races Are Over?” (Cover Story, July 14). First, I think society should be more evolved so that races are banned in the first place. Second, I think the working class should want to boycott the races because they are oppressed by their masters, and the lines of class division are clearly drawn at the racetrack.

Next, I would like to say that I think the rescuers who want to save the Thoroughbreds from the slaughterhouses, I hope they don’t eat meat. And finally, you mentioned that a Dave Quinn was a beneficiary of horses that end up in Phoenix. Well, actually, the leader of local band Tiltwheel, his name is Dave Quinn, and his father’s name is Dave Quinn.

Lorelei
via voice mail

Support Your Local Barn

I was so happy to see your story raising awareness for the futures of our gallant Thoroughbreds after they have given it their all (“Where Do They Go When the Races Are Over?” Cover Story, July 14). I know readers were encouraged to hear of the diminished path that led to untimely death. But readers should also be aware of the precarious position of our ranch owners. So many are operating in the red right now but subsidizing their passion in hopes that things will turn around. Many have not been able to hold on. Hay prices are astronomical. Growers that have not switched to cotton are often offered exorbitant compensation from foreign horse owners for their entire cutting. These “deals that are too good to pass up” generate supply shortages and high prices here at home. In California, especially, the worker compensation requirements are breaking the bank for owners.

What can we do to see this piece of our equestrian heritage survive? Support your local barns. If you don’t use their services yourself, be their advocate. And if you have a desire to ride, you’d be surprised how affordable it actually is to get yourself a weekly session with a trainer. As our past president said, “There’s nothing better for the inside of a man than the outside of a horse.”

Sue Hardman
via email

Good Fodder

Don Bauder’s article “What? No War?” (“City Lights,” July 14) is a good example of the practical application of Darwin. We have seen so many adaptations in the business world, like computers replacing typewriters, autos replacing the horse and buggy, science replacing religion. Darwin said that it’s not the brute strength or the IQ that wins in the long run; it’s the ability to adapt. This is a poignant application that is good fodder for the defense industry. And that gets the point across.

Ted Rodosovich
University City

Hanging On Honor

I’m calling about “City Lights” — “Thief Does His Homework,” by Eva Knott. It ends on page 50 with nothing. It just says “The Honor-” — and it doesn’t say “continued.” A very interesting story about this thief that got through the Carlsbad jewelry store and all the shenanigans for years for which he should be locked up. I mean, it’s a horrible story to read. But, please, continue it. Don’t leave us just hanging.

Name Withheld
via voice mail

The story’s last sentence was, “On June 28, the Honorable Aaron Katz sentenced Davis to 50 years to life.” — Editor

Get Streets Straight

Regarding “Lovely Newspaperman” by Gail Powell (“Stringers,” July 14). Yes, this was a tragedy, and I don’t want to minimize that. But could your stringers get the names of streets correct? There is no such street as Point Loma Boulevard. There is a Point Loma Avenue and a West Point Loma Boulevard. They are not the same street, they do not connect, and they are a mile apart at their closest point. As a Point Loma Avenue resident, I’ve gotten used to late repairmen, lost deliverymen, misdirected mail, confused houseguests, and not being able to get delivered pizzas, but I hold people who are getting paid to provide information to a higher standard. (By the way, the 7-Eleven Powell refers to is off West Point Loma Boulevard.)

Brent Bernau
via email

Craft Beers Cost!

Great article on craft beers (“Beer Heaven,” Cover Story, July 7). One thing the story failed to mention is how much more expensive they are! If I bought craft beer as often as I buy my Bud/Miller/Coors, I would be selling my house and living in a freaking trailer park. Until I win the lottery, I won’t be buying a whole lot of craft beers — just a few.

Name Withheld By Request

Tastergate

I noticed on page 28 of your latest Reader (“Beer Heaven,” Cover Story, July 7) the statement, “At $4 for 5 tasters, my choices include an ESB — “Extra Special Bitter” — an IPA, a brown, and a pilsner.”

As far as I understand, looking through the article, there are only four mentions of tasters, not five. I just thought I’d mention it. I mean, you know, I’ve nothing else better to do, reading and noticing things like that and wondering what the fifth taster was, if there was a fifth one.

Michael
via voice mail

Ed Bedford responds: Dear Michael, The Fifth Taster. Wow, what a title for a mystery novel. I know how maddening that can be, when some guy says there are five things and only mentions four. Though I did say my choices “include” ESB, etc., not “were,” probably because I just couldn’t recall. By this time, all the “research” had clouded my little memory cells till they resembled a cask ale release at Hamilton’s on a Friday night. (Murky.) Let’s see...Hmm. D’uh, oh, yes. I think it was probably a New English “Why Not? American Wheat Beer,” though wheat beers aren’t my favorite.

Too Involved

I do appreciate Gail Powell’s columns when they are related to things in our community; however, I find that the biased position she has toward Bonnie Dumanis is not acceptable in writing an objective article (“The Shame,” “Stringers,” July 7). I attended the kickoff fund-raiser, and one of the biggest protesters screaming out at San Diego Citizens was Gail. When writing about Ms. Dumanis, this should be placed under an opinion section, not under a newsworthy column. Reporters should not be personally involved in the stories when they are unable to give an unprejudiced opinion.

Name Withheld
via email

Shared The Love

Jerry, thank you for your love of San Diego County and for sharing it with us (“End of the Trail,” “Roam-O-Rama,” July 7). You are, of course, right in your assessment of the great geographical diversity of our region and how lucky we all are to be able to enjoy it, and thanks for your help in that regard. I am very sorry to hear about your illness and hope that you have been fulfilled in this life. Thanks for your good work. I will miss it.

Peace,

Stephen A. Smith
via email

Beat It

Jerry, you came to my office on Broadway (Frost House in Golden Hill) when you first got into town; I believe you were doing photography at the time (“End of the Trail,” “Roam-O-Rama,” July 7). It was a most pleasant visit as I recall, and while I regret that we never got to work together, you did quite well without my help. You have provided uncounted people much pleasure and have thus (and in other countless ways) greatly made this place and the world much, much better. Not many can say that, and even fewer than it is true for you.

Despite the state of your illness, I hope you will heal and beat it. Ask your physician about “mega” doses of vitamin D, even though, with all your time outdoors, your levels might be somewhat higher than most unless you’ve used a lot of sunscreen. There have been other recent advances in treatment, so keep on plugging and know that thousands or millions are in your corner!

Wayne Tyson
via email

Happy Trails

Dear Mr. Schad, thank you for many years of describing the beautiful areas in our county, which have guided me to places I probably would not have discovered (“End of the Trail,” “Roam-O-Rama,” July 7). Happy trails.

Kim C. Cox
via email

Star Struck

Le Quattro Volte is one of the worst movies I have ever seen in 72 years (Movie Review, June 30). For David Elliott to give it four stars is absolutely unforgivable. The movie has absolutely no script (zero). There is no acting. There is a complex array of seeing goats and a sick man eating dust that has been blessed. The cutting down of a tree and the emergence of mineral charcoal. So what if it represents four souls in different forms (human, animal, vegetable, and mineral). On-screen it has no meaning at all. It is not even a documentary. I am so sorry that people who respect the Reader to help guide them in some cases to see certain movies get duped by Elliott. Duncan Shepherd was terrible, but I thought Elliott was better. I have reviewed movies for a San Antonio Jewish magazine with respect for those individuals reading the review. I am shocked, perplexed, and very upset with Elliott’s offbeat review. We as people in San Diego deserve respect with better critique. While I agree that the Tree of Life failed, it was much better in many respects than “Four Times.” To give it one star and to give this movie four stars — people should be asking for their hard-earned money back from the Gaslamp. Not to say that Elliott should return anyone’s money back as well. Please do better, Reader, in choosing your movie critics. Sorry!

Kenneth Blum
via email

Mission Statement

Re “Why Would the FBI Give $223 Million to This Man?” (Cover Story, June 30). This incisive article represents a welcome change to including investigative journalism. You must make it a regular part of your editorial mission.

Al Rodbell
via email

We’re Two For Four

Printing the food blogs from Ed Bedford and Barbarella is a good call (July 7). From Naomi Wise and Brandon Hernandez, not so much.

Name Withheld

Goofy With No Fun

I’m disappointed in the “mind-benders” (“Brainstorms”). They’re not as humorous or fun as they used to be. It’s just goofy, stupid stuff, but it’s not fun goofy, stupid stuff. That’s all I have to say. I enjoy the Reader, and I appreciate the publication, but the puzzle is just not doing it anymore.

Ted Fabares
via voice mail

Preeminent Force Ruling Human Existence

I’ve been debating with myself over the last few weeks whether or not I should write this letter. Obviously, I outvoted myself and wrote it. I concluded I absolutely had to tell you that Ms. Barbarella’s fans accept her dim-witted warnings without question.

In the first place, what really irks me is that Barbarella has presented us with a Hobson’s choice. Either we let her apotheosize the most merciless dingbats you’ll ever see, or she’ll hasten society’s quiescence to moral pluralism and epistemological uncertainty.

I close this letter along the same lines it opened on: Ms. Barbarella’s inclinations are very much in line with wrongheaded emotionalism in that they transform fear and its inculcation into the preeminent force ruling human existence.

The Epic Gnar
via email

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1

Lorelei, what a pretty name. Old German, I believe, something about a murmuring rock. So what should horses do, then, if not run. Stand in the meadow? (I would have left this message via voice mail, but I had a tip on a filly in the eighth race and there was only two minutes until post time.)

July 22, 2011

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