Anchor ads are not supported on this page.

4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Mojo Nixon Comix & Stories - Mojo's autobiographical cartoon

RIP to a former MTV outlaw and underground icon

Mojo Nixon performs a surprise set at the Rock 'N' Roll Comics booth at the 1994 San Diego Comic-Con - Image by Jay Allen Sanford
Mojo Nixon performs a surprise set at the Rock 'N' Roll Comics booth at the 1994 San Diego Comic-Con

In more bad news for 2024, Mojo Nixon has passed away. Nixon was born Neill Kirby McMillan, Jr., on August 2, 1957 in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. A part of the psychobilly movement, he was known for his boisterousness, his often scathing critiques of pop culture, and his libertarian political views.

Nixon paired with Skid Roper (aka Richard Banke) in the early 1980s in San Diego. Roper mostly provided instrumental backup to Nixon's lyrics. Nixon and Roper released their first album in 1985 on Enigma Records. Although the album's title is officially Mojo Nixon and Skid Roper, many fans refer to it as "Free, Drunk and Horny." The song "Jesus at McDonald's" from that album was the duo's first noteworthy single.

Nixon and Roper's third album, 1987's Bo-Day-Shus!!! featured the song "Elvis Is Everywhere," a deification of Elvis Presley, which is probably Nixon's best-known song (he later declared that his personal religious trinity was Presley, Foghorn Leghorn, and Otis Campbell).

Throughout the late 1980s, Nixon and Roper frequently insulted contemporary celebrities such as MTV VJ Martha Quinn ("Stuffin' Martha's Muffin"), Rick Astley, and Deborah Gibson ("Debbie Gibson Is Pregnant with My Two-Headed Love Child"). Nixon appeared in several promotional spots for MTV during this period, but the network's decision to not show the video for "Debbie Gibson Is Pregnant with My Two-Headed Love Child," which starred Winona Ryder, prompted him to sever ties with the network. Meanwhile, the duo also lampooned contemporary American culture and social issues in songs such as "I Hate Banks," "Burn Down the Malls," and "The Amazing Bigfoot Diet."

In 1998 he had a short run as an advice columnist with "Life Fixin' with Mojo Nixon." Only two columns were authored, and both ran in the short-lived Peterbelly magazine.

Nixon and Roper parted ways late in 1989. The following year Nixon recorded a solo album on Engima called Otis, on which he continued his assault on pop culture, most notably in the song "Don Henley Must Die." Several years after its release, Henley jumped onstage with Nixon at the Hole in the Wall in Austin, Texas to perform the song. Although since Henley didn't actually know the words, the pair agreed to sing "Rick Astley Must Die" instead. 

When Henley jumped out of the crowd, the dumbfounded Nixon immediately asked "Is Debbie Gibson here too?" Nixon later praised Henley thusly: "He has balls the size of church bells!"

Shortly after Otis was released, Enigma Records went bankrupt, which left much of Nixon's early catalog in legal limbo. In the 1990s, Nixon released a handful of albums on several labels with a backup band known as the Toadliquors. These later albums included songs such as "You Can't Kill Me," "Orenthal James (Was a Mighty Bad Man)," and the controversial "Bring Me the Head of David Geffen," which was ultimately released on a B-side collection due to pressure from album distributors. Also among his later work was "Tie My Pecker to My Leg," which featured lyrics about bestiality, incest, and coprophilia.

In the mid-1990s Nixon collaborated on albums with Jello Biafra (Prairie Home Invasion), Dave Alvin, and members of the Beat Farmers (Live in Las Vegas by the Pleasure Barons). Country Dick Montana of the Beat Farmers, who was a close friend of Nixon's, was eulogized on Nixon's final album, The Real Sock Ray Blue, after his 1995 death onstage of a heart attack. In the late 1990s, Nixon worked as a radio DJ in San Diego and Cincinnati.

Nixon officially retired from the music business in 2004, playing his last live show on March 20 of that year at the Continental Club in Austin, Texas. His first comeback was in 2006 when he came out of retirement in support of author Kinky Friedman's bid to become governor of Texas.

As of 2006 he hosted two shows on Sirius Satellite Radio's Outlaw Country channel 63 (The Loon in the Afternoon and The Saturday Night Demolition Derby), and a politically themed talk show called Lying Cocksuckers on Sirius Raw Dog 104. 

In 2009, Nixon was still claiming to be retired, but performing occasional shows. In late 2009, he announced a "new" album, collecting unreleased tracks, called Whiskey Rebellion.

As of 2012, he was back to performing and touring regularly. In late September 2012, Nixon reunited with Skid Roper for a performance at the 31st annual Adams Avenue Street Fair. “Me and Skid? We haven’t played in 20 years,” he told the Reader. A Mojo bobblehead doll was created a couple of years ago by Aggronautix, limited to 500 numbered “throbble”-heads and priced at $19.95. A documentary film was recently released, The Mojo Manifesto: The Life & Times of Mojo Nixon.

Sponsored
Sponsored


With Mojo at the 2005 San Diego Comic-Con International for the world premier of The Story of Rock 'N' Roll Comics


On a personal note, Mojo Nixon was so supportive of my own work at Rock 'N' Roll Comics that he co-created our first fully authorized cartoon bio, as well as appearing in the documentary film about our publications, The Story of Rock 'N' Roll Comics, for which he also provided music. Mojo was one of the first people I called when I arrived in San Diego for the funeral of RnR Comics founder Todd Loren, and Mojo immediately offered to show up at our San Diego Comic-Con booth a couple of weeks later to perform a surprise concert set that jammed the aisles so bad that we were admonished by the fire marshal! Mojo also showed up at the world premier of the RnR Comics movie, which was the last time I got to spend time with him.

Here's Mojo's cartoon autobiography, a fanciful account drawn by Scott Jackson that originally appeared in the ZZ Top issue of Rock 'N' Roll Comics.  


Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Why parrots are so good for San Diego

They like palm nuts, eucalyptus gumnuts, not native plants
Next Article

South Park’s Big Kitchen offers food, love, and politics

Before she came to San Diego, Judy was a social worker
Mojo Nixon performs a surprise set at the Rock 'N' Roll Comics booth at the 1994 San Diego Comic-Con - Image by Jay Allen Sanford
Mojo Nixon performs a surprise set at the Rock 'N' Roll Comics booth at the 1994 San Diego Comic-Con

In more bad news for 2024, Mojo Nixon has passed away. Nixon was born Neill Kirby McMillan, Jr., on August 2, 1957 in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. A part of the psychobilly movement, he was known for his boisterousness, his often scathing critiques of pop culture, and his libertarian political views.

Nixon paired with Skid Roper (aka Richard Banke) in the early 1980s in San Diego. Roper mostly provided instrumental backup to Nixon's lyrics. Nixon and Roper released their first album in 1985 on Enigma Records. Although the album's title is officially Mojo Nixon and Skid Roper, many fans refer to it as "Free, Drunk and Horny." The song "Jesus at McDonald's" from that album was the duo's first noteworthy single.

Nixon and Roper's third album, 1987's Bo-Day-Shus!!! featured the song "Elvis Is Everywhere," a deification of Elvis Presley, which is probably Nixon's best-known song (he later declared that his personal religious trinity was Presley, Foghorn Leghorn, and Otis Campbell).

Throughout the late 1980s, Nixon and Roper frequently insulted contemporary celebrities such as MTV VJ Martha Quinn ("Stuffin' Martha's Muffin"), Rick Astley, and Deborah Gibson ("Debbie Gibson Is Pregnant with My Two-Headed Love Child"). Nixon appeared in several promotional spots for MTV during this period, but the network's decision to not show the video for "Debbie Gibson Is Pregnant with My Two-Headed Love Child," which starred Winona Ryder, prompted him to sever ties with the network. Meanwhile, the duo also lampooned contemporary American culture and social issues in songs such as "I Hate Banks," "Burn Down the Malls," and "The Amazing Bigfoot Diet."

In 1998 he had a short run as an advice columnist with "Life Fixin' with Mojo Nixon." Only two columns were authored, and both ran in the short-lived Peterbelly magazine.

Nixon and Roper parted ways late in 1989. The following year Nixon recorded a solo album on Engima called Otis, on which he continued his assault on pop culture, most notably in the song "Don Henley Must Die." Several years after its release, Henley jumped onstage with Nixon at the Hole in the Wall in Austin, Texas to perform the song. Although since Henley didn't actually know the words, the pair agreed to sing "Rick Astley Must Die" instead. 

When Henley jumped out of the crowd, the dumbfounded Nixon immediately asked "Is Debbie Gibson here too?" Nixon later praised Henley thusly: "He has balls the size of church bells!"

Shortly after Otis was released, Enigma Records went bankrupt, which left much of Nixon's early catalog in legal limbo. In the 1990s, Nixon released a handful of albums on several labels with a backup band known as the Toadliquors. These later albums included songs such as "You Can't Kill Me," "Orenthal James (Was a Mighty Bad Man)," and the controversial "Bring Me the Head of David Geffen," which was ultimately released on a B-side collection due to pressure from album distributors. Also among his later work was "Tie My Pecker to My Leg," which featured lyrics about bestiality, incest, and coprophilia.

In the mid-1990s Nixon collaborated on albums with Jello Biafra (Prairie Home Invasion), Dave Alvin, and members of the Beat Farmers (Live in Las Vegas by the Pleasure Barons). Country Dick Montana of the Beat Farmers, who was a close friend of Nixon's, was eulogized on Nixon's final album, The Real Sock Ray Blue, after his 1995 death onstage of a heart attack. In the late 1990s, Nixon worked as a radio DJ in San Diego and Cincinnati.

Nixon officially retired from the music business in 2004, playing his last live show on March 20 of that year at the Continental Club in Austin, Texas. His first comeback was in 2006 when he came out of retirement in support of author Kinky Friedman's bid to become governor of Texas.

As of 2006 he hosted two shows on Sirius Satellite Radio's Outlaw Country channel 63 (The Loon in the Afternoon and The Saturday Night Demolition Derby), and a politically themed talk show called Lying Cocksuckers on Sirius Raw Dog 104. 

In 2009, Nixon was still claiming to be retired, but performing occasional shows. In late 2009, he announced a "new" album, collecting unreleased tracks, called Whiskey Rebellion.

As of 2012, he was back to performing and touring regularly. In late September 2012, Nixon reunited with Skid Roper for a performance at the 31st annual Adams Avenue Street Fair. “Me and Skid? We haven’t played in 20 years,” he told the Reader. A Mojo bobblehead doll was created a couple of years ago by Aggronautix, limited to 500 numbered “throbble”-heads and priced at $19.95. A documentary film was recently released, The Mojo Manifesto: The Life & Times of Mojo Nixon.

Sponsored
Sponsored


With Mojo at the 2005 San Diego Comic-Con International for the world premier of The Story of Rock 'N' Roll Comics


On a personal note, Mojo Nixon was so supportive of my own work at Rock 'N' Roll Comics that he co-created our first fully authorized cartoon bio, as well as appearing in the documentary film about our publications, The Story of Rock 'N' Roll Comics, for which he also provided music. Mojo was one of the first people I called when I arrived in San Diego for the funeral of RnR Comics founder Todd Loren, and Mojo immediately offered to show up at our San Diego Comic-Con booth a couple of weeks later to perform a surprise concert set that jammed the aisles so bad that we were admonished by the fire marshal! Mojo also showed up at the world premier of the RnR Comics movie, which was the last time I got to spend time with him.

Here's Mojo's cartoon autobiography, a fanciful account drawn by Scott Jackson that originally appeared in the ZZ Top issue of Rock 'N' Roll Comics.  


Comments
Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Imperial Beach's 9th Street squeezed to slow the cars

Crosswalks, bike lanes, pop-outs, pedestrian medians – by the end of the year
Next Article

"Naked Corals" are showing their stuff, African Daisies blooming everywhere

Extreme tides this weekend
Comments
Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Drinks All Around — Bartenders' drink recipes Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories Fishing Report — What’s getting hooked from ship and shore From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town The Gonzo Report — Making the musical scene, or at least reporting from it Letters — Our inbox Movies@Home — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Outdoors — Weekly changes in flora and fauna Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Street Style — San Diego streets have style Surf Diego — Real stories from those braving the waves Theater — On stage in San Diego this week Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close

Anchor ads are not supported on this page.