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A reader defines real love

Plus comments on Neighborhood News and News Ticker

“That’s real love, or the most productive, good, and much-needed consciousness.”
“That’s real love, or the most productive, good, and much-needed consciousness.”

That’s real love, right?

Re: “South Bay residents still leery,” Neighborhood News.

I just wanted to give a voice to people who see that projects like this, “for recovering addicts who would otherwise be in jail,” are a welcome use of limited resources rather than for the oppressive “take down and lock up” mentality that remains the go-to approach instead of remedying the problem at the root.

A significant if not vast majority of those the treatment approach would reach are juvenile and young people. The most effective time to reach and productively assist those who have unfortunately fallen by the wayside is early in their lives. An ever-increasing number of us, with the present engrained culture of the justice system, are falling by the wayside.

The focus should be on caring intervention and treatment, not pretending there is no problem or trying to eradicate the symptoms that addiction represents. Those symptoms are from an economic system gone array, which results from and is perpetuated by a mostly less than conscious culture spanning from simply not caring to outright hate. We should celebrate, welcome, and support these wholesome residential facilities.

That’s real love, or the most productive, good, and much-needed consciousness, right? That mentality can soon once again catch on and become the living majority culture. We have seen it before.

  • Todd G. Glanz
  • Chula Vista

Stepping over the homeless wouldn’t make me feel good

Re: “People Living in Cars and RVs Stand Up,” News Ticker.

I am “coming out of the closet” for this letter. I am homeless. I have been homeless here and in Denver CO since 2003, with a few breaks. This gives me some insight into the different ways of doing things, and I would like to share them starting with San Diego.

San Diego gets a very poor grade from me in homeless services. Because of the weather here the city feels it’s alright to have people sleeping in the dirt. Showers are poor, and unless you are downtown food is spotty.

The homeless also get a poor grade from me. Trash everywhere, stealing and running around the streets all night because there is nowhere to go. Denver has a no-camping law. Parks off-limits after a certain time of night, no shopping carts, less homeless trash, decent showers, decent food with three meals a day usually in various parts of the city limits. Also housing, day and night shelters all year long, free clinic to the poor, and job services for those who want to work.

Sounds good, but not to the homeless. The homeless of Denver have tried to get a law passed for years called the Right to Rest Act. Basically it gives the homeless there the same rights as the homeless here. The only thing is, Denver isn’t going for it in any way, shape, or form. They have put into place something that works for everyone, not just one group of people.

That brings me to the end, which is San Diego needs to get its act together as far as services which include housing, shelters, and work. Then I would welcome changing the laws that make it harder to be homeless.

Everyone should feel good about where they live, and stepping over the homeless as you go to work wouldn’t make me feel good. Or trying to find a place in a park that you can spend the day with your family shouldn’t be a chore; it should be pleasant. I’m afraid that, while I didn’t mention it, this [also] goes for people sleeping in cars and RVs. The rules should be no different for them, but first you need to know you have the services before you make the change. It doesn’t have to work for everyone, it just has to work.

  • Sam King
  • Countywide

These diseases are [not] caused by exposure to ionizing radiation

Re: Letters to the Editor, “These diseases are caused by exposure to ionizing radiation.”

Numerous epidemiological studies have been conducted on children in the U.S. and France (which has 50 nuclear power plants) living near nuclear power plants and none show higher-than-normal rates of childhood leukemia or lymphoma. Similar studies on dental x-rays do not show a causal link either.

Drs. Sgernglass and Caldecott never produced any controlled randomized peer-reviewed studies to back up their claims. With regard to the letter writer’s comments on cancer treatment, native Americans were not and are not able to cure serious diseases including cancer with plants. And no one has been able to cure such serious diseases with acupuncture. These are the facts.

  • Name withheld
  • Clairemont

Political cake you can eat

Re: “Marijuana delivery providers seek council motion,” News Ticker.

As the adage goes, “You can’t have your cake and eat it too.” This is especially true in politics, except for one small exception. Well, really a huge exception: medical marijuana. Confused? Don’t be.

First, a brief history of the legal marijuana industry in California. In 1996, California approved Proposition 215, known as the Compassionate Use Act, with 55.6% of the vote. This law allowed for the use of medical marijuana for therapeutic purposes. The bill was enacted into law in November 1996. In 2003, Senate Bill 420 was ratified into CA Health and Safety codes to codify the industry, require doctor oversight to acquire cannabis, and developed quantity possession guidelines. Most recently, California voters passed Proposition 64 to legalize adult use of marijuana, with 57.1% voting in favor.

Currently, medical and adult use of marijuana is regulated by the Bureau of Cannabis Control, a state regulatory agency. With the implementation deadline of January 1, 2018 for adult cannabis use looming, municipalities around the state are scrambling to enact legislation to regulate as needed. Carlsbad City Council enacted their cannabis regulation on September 26, 2017. Carlsbad City Council voted 4-1 on an ordinance to ban all commercial cannabis activity in the city. Violations of the new ordinance are punishable by misdemeanor.

As a pioneer of the cannabis industry actively involved in cannabis regulations, the frustration of Council members statewide resonates with me. It seems every few weeks Sacramento rescinds posted regulations and replaces them with new emergency regulations. While each new set of regulations is produced to address failings in previous iterations, the ripple effect through city hall is disruptive to social welfare. As just happened in Carlsbad, City Councils are removing themselves from the confusion by enacting outright bans, so as to return the pertinent work of managing their city.

While I disagree with the banning of all commercial cannabis activity in Carlsbad, I empathize with the City Council and their decision. Carlsbad is a quaint, ultra-family friendly destination with a rich, colorful heritage and deep roots in California history. Carlsbad is also home to thousands of regular cannabis consumers. In speaking with some Carlsbad residents, many were shocked to hear about the vote and more shocked at the penalties associated. “Why did I bother voting for Prop 64 if they [City Council] are just going to take it away?” was a common response to my news of the ban.

In Carlsbad, a significant majority of the cannabis consumers are 55 years of age or older and hundreds are infirmed, non-ambulatory, and home bound. Of those hundreds of home-bound residents, 18 are under my care as a cannabis therapy practitioner. Some do not have living relatives, and I am the only “outside world” person they get to interact with, aside from their nurses. Unfortunately, my companionship and cannabis therapy does not qualify me as a caregiver under California law. Therefore, on October 26, my service to them will be considered a misdemeanor, a risk I cannot afford to take. I am certain Carlsbad City Council members did not realize their actions to preserve community culture would have such terrible recourse on the quality of life for our greatest generation.

As stated in the beginning, I have a political proposal which will allow members of Carlsbad City Council to have their cake and eat it too. The win-win can be accomplished with limited, licensed cannabis delivery service. I suggest the Carlsbad Council Members follow suit of the La Quinta and Rancho Mirage City Councils. Both beautiful desert cities are bustling retirement destinations with international appeal. Both saw the blight created in other cities by less reputable marijuana industry operators. However, they were also conscious to the news of seniors being the fastest growing segment of cannabis consumer. In pragmatic fashion, these affluent cities chose to shelter their cities from the raw cannabis industry while allowing for access to happen discretely through regulated cannabis delivery.

Limited, licensed cannabis delivery can and should happen in Carlsbad as soon as possible. The regulatory frame work couldn’t be simpler. All cannabis activity can remain banned from locating within the city while acknowledging a limited number of medical cannabis therapy practitioners, headquartered outside of the city, to enter the city and provide medical marijuana to those who need it. To qualify for a delivery license, a delivery service operator must provide:

• An application to deliver medical marijuana (maintain an adult use ban)

• Copy of Non-Profit status stamped by the CA Secretary of State

• Copy of driver license and doctor recommendation for drivers

• Copy of Live Scan -Department of Justice background check (free of moral turpitude convictions)

• Copy of public liability and property damage insurance covering each delivery vehicle

• Copy of valid vehicle registration

• Add Carlsbad as business location on Sellers Permit (to secure local tax basis)

This kind of limited licensing, combined with the seed-to-sale cannabis-tracking software mandated in state regulations, allows law enforcement to know when a legal medical marijuana delivery is coming into town and by whom. Should there be a face-to-face interaction with law enforcement, the delivery driver would be mandated to carry a travel manifest which would include, but is not limited to, a valid business license, valid driver license, insurance, doctor recommendation, and a valid delivery permit for the vehicle. Violators could be easily identified and prosecuted while properly licensed operators maintain the status quo.

I pray this op-ed reaches the Carlsbad City Council before anyone is negatively affected by the lack of safe cannabis access. Without swift action, marijuana demand will be addressed by the black market. I am sure the Carlsbad Police Department and San Diego County Courts have more pressing issues than processing low-level marijuana misdemeanors. As I stated in my comment in open council, I am available to assist, converse, or debate as needed. I have 18 souls relying on me to stand up for their rights, and I will do everything in my power to preserve their quality of life.

No matter the city you live, I urge everyone who reads this op-ed to reach out to your council person and express your thoughts and feelings. Government only works for the benefit of the people if the people communicate their wants and needs.

  • Sam Humeid
  • Carlsbad

Address? Phone number?

I would like to know why — on the pages where you print the names of the clubs and who’s appearing — you do not give an address or a phone number so that someone might be able to go there.

It would make it much easier for someone to go to the club. So, if you can, I hope you’ll start doing this.

  • Alan Gold
  • Via voicemail

Let’s get some atheist stuff up in here

Regarding the Sheep and Goats column: why don’t you throw in some atheist st periodically? There’s lots out there.

  • Teddy Rodosovich
  • La Jolla
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Previous article

Mustard, cottonwoods, locust trees, black oaks

Gopher snakes, garter snakes, king snakes, rosy boas and three varieties of rattlesnakes
“That’s real love, or the most productive, good, and much-needed consciousness.”
“That’s real love, or the most productive, good, and much-needed consciousness.”

That’s real love, right?

Re: “South Bay residents still leery,” Neighborhood News.

I just wanted to give a voice to people who see that projects like this, “for recovering addicts who would otherwise be in jail,” are a welcome use of limited resources rather than for the oppressive “take down and lock up” mentality that remains the go-to approach instead of remedying the problem at the root.

A significant if not vast majority of those the treatment approach would reach are juvenile and young people. The most effective time to reach and productively assist those who have unfortunately fallen by the wayside is early in their lives. An ever-increasing number of us, with the present engrained culture of the justice system, are falling by the wayside.

The focus should be on caring intervention and treatment, not pretending there is no problem or trying to eradicate the symptoms that addiction represents. Those symptoms are from an economic system gone array, which results from and is perpetuated by a mostly less than conscious culture spanning from simply not caring to outright hate. We should celebrate, welcome, and support these wholesome residential facilities.

That’s real love, or the most productive, good, and much-needed consciousness, right? That mentality can soon once again catch on and become the living majority culture. We have seen it before.

  • Todd G. Glanz
  • Chula Vista

Stepping over the homeless wouldn’t make me feel good

Re: “People Living in Cars and RVs Stand Up,” News Ticker.

I am “coming out of the closet” for this letter. I am homeless. I have been homeless here and in Denver CO since 2003, with a few breaks. This gives me some insight into the different ways of doing things, and I would like to share them starting with San Diego.

San Diego gets a very poor grade from me in homeless services. Because of the weather here the city feels it’s alright to have people sleeping in the dirt. Showers are poor, and unless you are downtown food is spotty.

The homeless also get a poor grade from me. Trash everywhere, stealing and running around the streets all night because there is nowhere to go. Denver has a no-camping law. Parks off-limits after a certain time of night, no shopping carts, less homeless trash, decent showers, decent food with three meals a day usually in various parts of the city limits. Also housing, day and night shelters all year long, free clinic to the poor, and job services for those who want to work.

Sounds good, but not to the homeless. The homeless of Denver have tried to get a law passed for years called the Right to Rest Act. Basically it gives the homeless there the same rights as the homeless here. The only thing is, Denver isn’t going for it in any way, shape, or form. They have put into place something that works for everyone, not just one group of people.

That brings me to the end, which is San Diego needs to get its act together as far as services which include housing, shelters, and work. Then I would welcome changing the laws that make it harder to be homeless.

Everyone should feel good about where they live, and stepping over the homeless as you go to work wouldn’t make me feel good. Or trying to find a place in a park that you can spend the day with your family shouldn’t be a chore; it should be pleasant. I’m afraid that, while I didn’t mention it, this [also] goes for people sleeping in cars and RVs. The rules should be no different for them, but first you need to know you have the services before you make the change. It doesn’t have to work for everyone, it just has to work.

  • Sam King
  • Countywide

These diseases are [not] caused by exposure to ionizing radiation

Re: Letters to the Editor, “These diseases are caused by exposure to ionizing radiation.”

Numerous epidemiological studies have been conducted on children in the U.S. and France (which has 50 nuclear power plants) living near nuclear power plants and none show higher-than-normal rates of childhood leukemia or lymphoma. Similar studies on dental x-rays do not show a causal link either.

Drs. Sgernglass and Caldecott never produced any controlled randomized peer-reviewed studies to back up their claims. With regard to the letter writer’s comments on cancer treatment, native Americans were not and are not able to cure serious diseases including cancer with plants. And no one has been able to cure such serious diseases with acupuncture. These are the facts.

  • Name withheld
  • Clairemont

Political cake you can eat

Re: “Marijuana delivery providers seek council motion,” News Ticker.

As the adage goes, “You can’t have your cake and eat it too.” This is especially true in politics, except for one small exception. Well, really a huge exception: medical marijuana. Confused? Don’t be.

First, a brief history of the legal marijuana industry in California. In 1996, California approved Proposition 215, known as the Compassionate Use Act, with 55.6% of the vote. This law allowed for the use of medical marijuana for therapeutic purposes. The bill was enacted into law in November 1996. In 2003, Senate Bill 420 was ratified into CA Health and Safety codes to codify the industry, require doctor oversight to acquire cannabis, and developed quantity possession guidelines. Most recently, California voters passed Proposition 64 to legalize adult use of marijuana, with 57.1% voting in favor.

Currently, medical and adult use of marijuana is regulated by the Bureau of Cannabis Control, a state regulatory agency. With the implementation deadline of January 1, 2018 for adult cannabis use looming, municipalities around the state are scrambling to enact legislation to regulate as needed. Carlsbad City Council enacted their cannabis regulation on September 26, 2017. Carlsbad City Council voted 4-1 on an ordinance to ban all commercial cannabis activity in the city. Violations of the new ordinance are punishable by misdemeanor.

As a pioneer of the cannabis industry actively involved in cannabis regulations, the frustration of Council members statewide resonates with me. It seems every few weeks Sacramento rescinds posted regulations and replaces them with new emergency regulations. While each new set of regulations is produced to address failings in previous iterations, the ripple effect through city hall is disruptive to social welfare. As just happened in Carlsbad, City Councils are removing themselves from the confusion by enacting outright bans, so as to return the pertinent work of managing their city.

While I disagree with the banning of all commercial cannabis activity in Carlsbad, I empathize with the City Council and their decision. Carlsbad is a quaint, ultra-family friendly destination with a rich, colorful heritage and deep roots in California history. Carlsbad is also home to thousands of regular cannabis consumers. In speaking with some Carlsbad residents, many were shocked to hear about the vote and more shocked at the penalties associated. “Why did I bother voting for Prop 64 if they [City Council] are just going to take it away?” was a common response to my news of the ban.

In Carlsbad, a significant majority of the cannabis consumers are 55 years of age or older and hundreds are infirmed, non-ambulatory, and home bound. Of those hundreds of home-bound residents, 18 are under my care as a cannabis therapy practitioner. Some do not have living relatives, and I am the only “outside world” person they get to interact with, aside from their nurses. Unfortunately, my companionship and cannabis therapy does not qualify me as a caregiver under California law. Therefore, on October 26, my service to them will be considered a misdemeanor, a risk I cannot afford to take. I am certain Carlsbad City Council members did not realize their actions to preserve community culture would have such terrible recourse on the quality of life for our greatest generation.

As stated in the beginning, I have a political proposal which will allow members of Carlsbad City Council to have their cake and eat it too. The win-win can be accomplished with limited, licensed cannabis delivery service. I suggest the Carlsbad Council Members follow suit of the La Quinta and Rancho Mirage City Councils. Both beautiful desert cities are bustling retirement destinations with international appeal. Both saw the blight created in other cities by less reputable marijuana industry operators. However, they were also conscious to the news of seniors being the fastest growing segment of cannabis consumer. In pragmatic fashion, these affluent cities chose to shelter their cities from the raw cannabis industry while allowing for access to happen discretely through regulated cannabis delivery.

Limited, licensed cannabis delivery can and should happen in Carlsbad as soon as possible. The regulatory frame work couldn’t be simpler. All cannabis activity can remain banned from locating within the city while acknowledging a limited number of medical cannabis therapy practitioners, headquartered outside of the city, to enter the city and provide medical marijuana to those who need it. To qualify for a delivery license, a delivery service operator must provide:

• An application to deliver medical marijuana (maintain an adult use ban)

• Copy of Non-Profit status stamped by the CA Secretary of State

• Copy of driver license and doctor recommendation for drivers

• Copy of Live Scan -Department of Justice background check (free of moral turpitude convictions)

• Copy of public liability and property damage insurance covering each delivery vehicle

• Copy of valid vehicle registration

• Add Carlsbad as business location on Sellers Permit (to secure local tax basis)

This kind of limited licensing, combined with the seed-to-sale cannabis-tracking software mandated in state regulations, allows law enforcement to know when a legal medical marijuana delivery is coming into town and by whom. Should there be a face-to-face interaction with law enforcement, the delivery driver would be mandated to carry a travel manifest which would include, but is not limited to, a valid business license, valid driver license, insurance, doctor recommendation, and a valid delivery permit for the vehicle. Violators could be easily identified and prosecuted while properly licensed operators maintain the status quo.

I pray this op-ed reaches the Carlsbad City Council before anyone is negatively affected by the lack of safe cannabis access. Without swift action, marijuana demand will be addressed by the black market. I am sure the Carlsbad Police Department and San Diego County Courts have more pressing issues than processing low-level marijuana misdemeanors. As I stated in my comment in open council, I am available to assist, converse, or debate as needed. I have 18 souls relying on me to stand up for their rights, and I will do everything in my power to preserve their quality of life.

No matter the city you live, I urge everyone who reads this op-ed to reach out to your council person and express your thoughts and feelings. Government only works for the benefit of the people if the people communicate their wants and needs.

  • Sam Humeid
  • Carlsbad

Address? Phone number?

I would like to know why — on the pages where you print the names of the clubs and who’s appearing — you do not give an address or a phone number so that someone might be able to go there.

It would make it much easier for someone to go to the club. So, if you can, I hope you’ll start doing this.

  • Alan Gold
  • Via voicemail

Let’s get some atheist stuff up in here

Regarding the Sheep and Goats column: why don’t you throw in some atheist st periodically? There’s lots out there.

  • Teddy Rodosovich
  • La Jolla
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