4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Hipsters, thru-hikers, bonobos, thugs, and a former slave

This week's letters cover the gamut

Have something to get off your chest? Send us your feedback.
Have something to get off your chest? Send us your feedback.

You Cannot Do It This Year

Hello, there! I just finished reading your article, “Trail Angels” (June 15 cover story_ on the PCT. By the end of March this year, I started thru-hiking the PCT myself and have completed about 900 miles of the California section so far. I also thru-hiked the Appalachian Trail completely in both directions, so I know one thing or two about long distance backpacking.

Contrary to what one of the quoted hikers in the article is saying, you cannot determine from the first glance who will make the entire trip and who won’t. Also, the snow levels in the High Sierra are so massive that you just cannot do it this year, as this hiker suggests.

There have been fatal incidents already this spring, according to rangers at Whitney Portal. Almost all hikers of the class of 2017 have bypassed the High Sierra to come back later for that section because there is not only way too much snow up there, it is simply dangerous, too.

Regarding trail maintenance: Having completed the Southern part of the California section, the one from Campo to Kennedy Meadows, I unfortunately have to say that the PCT is in most parts in very bad condition. It is so bad that hikers are forced to circum-hike countless blow downs by trampling new trails in sandy, nondurable soils and, thus, helping erosion in these parts of the trail. Which makes the permit system totally ridiculous since the trampling effect occurs not through overuse but through forced bypassing on steep mountain slopes that now get affected and could have been saved from being destroyed if there was any trail maintenance in the first place.

I am right now taking a four-week break from the trail to give snows in higher elevations time to melt since also parts of the PCT north of the High Sierra are affected by lingering snowpacks in higher elevations, but will be turning back soon to resume at Mount Shasta.

If you don’t have experience with mountaineering skills (hiking in deep snows in high altitudes, how to handle an ice axe etc.) don’t attempt to thru-hike the High Sierra section of the PCT right now.

This year is definitely different with California’s record snowfalls.

  • Manuela Pinggera
  • Bavaria, Germany

Hipsters Ruin Everything That’s Good

Re: “An Excuse to Talk about Wonder Woman,” Immortal Beauty, June 15

Don’t beat around the bush. Around these parts, we have a simple label for those so-called “beta males” — hipsters — and they’re ruining everything that’s good about San Diego (and Denver, and Austin, and — well, you get it).

Actually it’s probably best that there’s a new movie out since hipsters are incapable of higher forms of communication and the entirety of their conversation is the yapping and bleating of hashtags and movie quotes.

  • Nichole Fullerton
  • City Heights

Former Slave Turned Folk Legend

A San Diego middle school whose yearbook inadvertently published a vintage photo of a road map containing a street name with a racial slur was profiled in News Ticker (“Poway Discovers More about Nate Harrison”). The controversial word, removed in 1955, was applied to Nate Harrison, San Diego County’s first black settler.

Place

Valley Center History Museum

29200 Cole Grade Road, Valley Center

Anyone interested in learning more about the former slave who became a folk legend in North County can visit the Valley Center History Museum which maintains an archive on Harrison and his homestead, and has a permanent exhibition in place.

  • Robert Lerner
  • Valley Center Historical Society
Why does the zoo hide them?

Doing What Is Natural

I discovered the wonder of bonobos when I was volunteering at the zoo and had the pleasure of getting to know them. There is no overestimating the tragedy if such unique creatures, our very close cousins, were not to be with us for future generations.

I once had a long talk with a woman who had been their keeper for a decade, about a little guy who always walked around with his face cupped by his hand who seemed upset. She told me, “First of all, being born a male means you’re in trouble to begin with.” The females do run the show among this crowd. She pointed out that the ubiquitous sexual play had nothing to do with bonding, as in other species such as ourselves.

For those with an interest in advanced genomics there’s this article in Nature: “The Bonobo Genome Compared with the Chimpanzee and Human Genomes.” It shows that we humans possess some of the lethal aggression of chimps, combined with the playful omnisexuality of bonobos. Like us, they have their moods, fears and neuroses.

Of course their neocortex, that part of the brain that allows us to assume that all difficulties are amenable to alleviation, are undeveloped, so they are who they are. Doing what is natural is their only option, and there are none in their species who impose moral judgement on themselves or others.

Hmm, maybe evolution is not all it’s cracked up to be.

  • Al Rodbell
  • Encinitas

They Do Indeed Send Out Thugs

I’m calling about an item that appeared in the May 18 issue, “Carl DeMaio Faces off against Jerry” (News Ticker). Apparently, Carl DeMaio was behind a petition to recall Senator Josh Newman who is in the 29th District — that’s up in the L.A./San Bernardino/Orange County area. DeMaio was saying that they are sending “thugs” out to keep people from signing these petitions.

Well, I’m a professional signature gatherer, and I can assure you that it’s very true that they do indeed send out thugs to stop people from signing. These thugs are usually in the form of young people, 30 or something. What they’ll do is approach a signature gatherer and just start yelling and screaming and do whatever they can do to discourage people from signing. It’s very disruptive. It disrupts the initiative process.

Petitioners are also registering people to vote. In one case I had one of these thugs interrupt me while I was trying to register someone to vote. We are all familiar with this tactic. It was done with the San Diego minimum wage referendum and a pension reform petition that Carl DeMaio was behind a few years ago. He’s very correct to use the word “thugs.”

The second bit of information I would like to add is that apparently attorneys for these grocery stores like Vons and Ralphs sent Carl DeMaio letters saying petitioners weren’t welcome. What the public should know is that these big box stores are calling the police constantly every time they see petitioners in front of the store. We’re protected by First Amendment, California, and Supreme Court laws.

  • Name withheld
  • via voicemail
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Appalled by cigarette ad, frightened by Gloria

Under the slavery of San Diego developers
Next Article

Acoustic entertainment and catered meals

Cathyrn Beeks, The Lyrical Groove, Ed Kornhauser, Tori Roze, Black Market III
Have something to get off your chest? Send us your feedback.
Have something to get off your chest? Send us your feedback.

You Cannot Do It This Year

Hello, there! I just finished reading your article, “Trail Angels” (June 15 cover story_ on the PCT. By the end of March this year, I started thru-hiking the PCT myself and have completed about 900 miles of the California section so far. I also thru-hiked the Appalachian Trail completely in both directions, so I know one thing or two about long distance backpacking.

Contrary to what one of the quoted hikers in the article is saying, you cannot determine from the first glance who will make the entire trip and who won’t. Also, the snow levels in the High Sierra are so massive that you just cannot do it this year, as this hiker suggests.

There have been fatal incidents already this spring, according to rangers at Whitney Portal. Almost all hikers of the class of 2017 have bypassed the High Sierra to come back later for that section because there is not only way too much snow up there, it is simply dangerous, too.

Regarding trail maintenance: Having completed the Southern part of the California section, the one from Campo to Kennedy Meadows, I unfortunately have to say that the PCT is in most parts in very bad condition. It is so bad that hikers are forced to circum-hike countless blow downs by trampling new trails in sandy, nondurable soils and, thus, helping erosion in these parts of the trail. Which makes the permit system totally ridiculous since the trampling effect occurs not through overuse but through forced bypassing on steep mountain slopes that now get affected and could have been saved from being destroyed if there was any trail maintenance in the first place.

I am right now taking a four-week break from the trail to give snows in higher elevations time to melt since also parts of the PCT north of the High Sierra are affected by lingering snowpacks in higher elevations, but will be turning back soon to resume at Mount Shasta.

If you don’t have experience with mountaineering skills (hiking in deep snows in high altitudes, how to handle an ice axe etc.) don’t attempt to thru-hike the High Sierra section of the PCT right now.

This year is definitely different with California’s record snowfalls.

  • Manuela Pinggera
  • Bavaria, Germany

Hipsters Ruin Everything That’s Good

Re: “An Excuse to Talk about Wonder Woman,” Immortal Beauty, June 15

Don’t beat around the bush. Around these parts, we have a simple label for those so-called “beta males” — hipsters — and they’re ruining everything that’s good about San Diego (and Denver, and Austin, and — well, you get it).

Actually it’s probably best that there’s a new movie out since hipsters are incapable of higher forms of communication and the entirety of their conversation is the yapping and bleating of hashtags and movie quotes.

  • Nichole Fullerton
  • City Heights

Former Slave Turned Folk Legend

A San Diego middle school whose yearbook inadvertently published a vintage photo of a road map containing a street name with a racial slur was profiled in News Ticker (“Poway Discovers More about Nate Harrison”). The controversial word, removed in 1955, was applied to Nate Harrison, San Diego County’s first black settler.

Place

Valley Center History Museum

29200 Cole Grade Road, Valley Center

Anyone interested in learning more about the former slave who became a folk legend in North County can visit the Valley Center History Museum which maintains an archive on Harrison and his homestead, and has a permanent exhibition in place.

  • Robert Lerner
  • Valley Center Historical Society
Why does the zoo hide them?

Doing What Is Natural

I discovered the wonder of bonobos when I was volunteering at the zoo and had the pleasure of getting to know them. There is no overestimating the tragedy if such unique creatures, our very close cousins, were not to be with us for future generations.

I once had a long talk with a woman who had been their keeper for a decade, about a little guy who always walked around with his face cupped by his hand who seemed upset. She told me, “First of all, being born a male means you’re in trouble to begin with.” The females do run the show among this crowd. She pointed out that the ubiquitous sexual play had nothing to do with bonding, as in other species such as ourselves.

For those with an interest in advanced genomics there’s this article in Nature: “The Bonobo Genome Compared with the Chimpanzee and Human Genomes.” It shows that we humans possess some of the lethal aggression of chimps, combined with the playful omnisexuality of bonobos. Like us, they have their moods, fears and neuroses.

Of course their neocortex, that part of the brain that allows us to assume that all difficulties are amenable to alleviation, are undeveloped, so they are who they are. Doing what is natural is their only option, and there are none in their species who impose moral judgement on themselves or others.

Hmm, maybe evolution is not all it’s cracked up to be.

  • Al Rodbell
  • Encinitas

They Do Indeed Send Out Thugs

I’m calling about an item that appeared in the May 18 issue, “Carl DeMaio Faces off against Jerry” (News Ticker). Apparently, Carl DeMaio was behind a petition to recall Senator Josh Newman who is in the 29th District — that’s up in the L.A./San Bernardino/Orange County area. DeMaio was saying that they are sending “thugs” out to keep people from signing these petitions.

Well, I’m a professional signature gatherer, and I can assure you that it’s very true that they do indeed send out thugs to stop people from signing. These thugs are usually in the form of young people, 30 or something. What they’ll do is approach a signature gatherer and just start yelling and screaming and do whatever they can do to discourage people from signing. It’s very disruptive. It disrupts the initiative process.

Petitioners are also registering people to vote. In one case I had one of these thugs interrupt me while I was trying to register someone to vote. We are all familiar with this tactic. It was done with the San Diego minimum wage referendum and a pension reform petition that Carl DeMaio was behind a few years ago. He’s very correct to use the word “thugs.”

The second bit of information I would like to add is that apparently attorneys for these grocery stores like Vons and Ralphs sent Carl DeMaio letters saying petitioners weren’t welcome. What the public should know is that these big box stores are calling the police constantly every time they see petitioners in front of the store. We’re protected by First Amendment, California, and Supreme Court laws.

  • Name withheld
  • via voicemail
Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Paxton adobe house in Escondido threatened

Model home for Longview Acres subdivision
Next Article

Appalled by cigarette ad, frightened by Gloria

Under the slavery of San Diego developers
Comments
1

To "Name withheld via voicemail": The "professional signature gatherer" is a large part of the problem with these petitions (including the outrageous SoccerCity one). The signature gatherers tend to lie a LOT when asked to explain the petitions. They only care about getting signatures by whatever means, to increase their pay. And they aren't necessarily San Diegans. P.S. When is Carl DeMaio going to move to DC and join the Trump administration? He'd fit right in with that nest of vipers.

June 21, 2017

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close