4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Property owners to shore up Bermuda Beach bluff

Surfrider won't fight planned seawall and stabilization project

Bermuda Beach and its broken staircase
Bermuda Beach and its broken staircase

The owners of three buildings above an Ocean Beach pocket beach known as Bermuda Beach are set to pay a mitigation fee of $82,000 for beach they hope won’t be created by bluff collapse.

The property owners are going to spend a lot more to build seawalls along 125 feet of coast to stop the continuing collapse of the bluffs that started last year after the big December rainstorm.

“The bluff there is still failing,” says Robert Trettin, the land-use consultant working with the owners. “Last week, another chunk of bluff fell.”

A 13-unit condo building, a duplex, and a 5-unit building are nearly at the edge of the failing bluff, part of which was shored up in April of this year with an emergency California Coastal Commission permit, Trettin said.

The collapse earlier this year severely damaged the staircase down to the beach at the end of Bermuda, though people still make their way there from the sturdy concrete stairs at Pescadero Avenue or the boat-launch-ramp-like road at the end of Cable Street.

Standing on the beach and looking up, the precarious state of the homes’ positions becomes obvious — if the properties’ histories don’t already make it clear.

“There was a house seaward of the four units when it was built,” Trettin said. “That went away a while back.”

Ocean Beach and Sunset Cliffs have a long history of building near the edge and armoring seawalls, installing splash walls, or putting in huge rip-rap boulders on the beach to deflect wave energy from the mostly sand bluffs.

The Surfrider Foundation, which has fought bluff armoring in Encinitas and Solana Beach, doesn’t plan to oppose the O.B. seawalls, according to policy manager Julia Chunn-Heer. She said the Coastal Act of 1972 came into effect long after the area was armored.

The 14-unit building on Bermuda Street was at the heart of creating a special assessment district called the Oceanus Geological Hazard Assessment District in 2010 to save up for precisely this kind of emergency, according to city documents.

But locals say they apparently haven’t saved enough — even with the extraordinary monthly homeowners' association fees of $500 a month for a one-bedroom condo.

There was a time when the city could have purchased the threatened homes and let the bluff collapse and form more beach, Trettin said. But with house values in the millions and oceanfront condos nearing $500,000, it is no longer a buy-able option.

As the matter goes to the coastal commission (with staff recommending approval at the December 14th meeting), the commission asked for an estimate of the value of the beach that wouldn’t be created (assuming an average of about 2.5 inches of new beach from bluff collapse per year for 20 years along 106 feet) as well as for the sand that won’t be created. (They also added 28 inches of width into the calculation for the actual seawall.)

The final figure: about $82,000, money that will be placed in a San Diego Association of Governments fund for public access and recreation. The fund currently contains no money for San Diego, according to SANDAG spokesman David Hicks. (It does contain $282,000 for the city of Encinitas, he noted.)

“It’s a realistic mitigation that everyone can agree on,” Trettin said.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

The Carpetbaggers part two: Elizabeth Ashley makes her screen debut

Of all the women who figure into Jonas’ life, she is the only one who isn’t a prostitute.
Next Article

Mainly Mozart's masterful melange

A consistent level of musical excellence that is unrivaled anywhere
Bermuda Beach and its broken staircase
Bermuda Beach and its broken staircase

The owners of three buildings above an Ocean Beach pocket beach known as Bermuda Beach are set to pay a mitigation fee of $82,000 for beach they hope won’t be created by bluff collapse.

The property owners are going to spend a lot more to build seawalls along 125 feet of coast to stop the continuing collapse of the bluffs that started last year after the big December rainstorm.

“The bluff there is still failing,” says Robert Trettin, the land-use consultant working with the owners. “Last week, another chunk of bluff fell.”

A 13-unit condo building, a duplex, and a 5-unit building are nearly at the edge of the failing bluff, part of which was shored up in April of this year with an emergency California Coastal Commission permit, Trettin said.

The collapse earlier this year severely damaged the staircase down to the beach at the end of Bermuda, though people still make their way there from the sturdy concrete stairs at Pescadero Avenue or the boat-launch-ramp-like road at the end of Cable Street.

Standing on the beach and looking up, the precarious state of the homes’ positions becomes obvious — if the properties’ histories don’t already make it clear.

“There was a house seaward of the four units when it was built,” Trettin said. “That went away a while back.”

Ocean Beach and Sunset Cliffs have a long history of building near the edge and armoring seawalls, installing splash walls, or putting in huge rip-rap boulders on the beach to deflect wave energy from the mostly sand bluffs.

The Surfrider Foundation, which has fought bluff armoring in Encinitas and Solana Beach, doesn’t plan to oppose the O.B. seawalls, according to policy manager Julia Chunn-Heer. She said the Coastal Act of 1972 came into effect long after the area was armored.

The 14-unit building on Bermuda Street was at the heart of creating a special assessment district called the Oceanus Geological Hazard Assessment District in 2010 to save up for precisely this kind of emergency, according to city documents.

But locals say they apparently haven’t saved enough — even with the extraordinary monthly homeowners' association fees of $500 a month for a one-bedroom condo.

There was a time when the city could have purchased the threatened homes and let the bluff collapse and form more beach, Trettin said. But with house values in the millions and oceanfront condos nearing $500,000, it is no longer a buy-able option.

As the matter goes to the coastal commission (with staff recommending approval at the December 14th meeting), the commission asked for an estimate of the value of the beach that wouldn’t be created (assuming an average of about 2.5 inches of new beach from bluff collapse per year for 20 years along 106 feet) as well as for the sand that won’t be created. (They also added 28 inches of width into the calculation for the actual seawall.)

The final figure: about $82,000, money that will be placed in a San Diego Association of Governments fund for public access and recreation. The fund currently contains no money for San Diego, according to SANDAG spokesman David Hicks. (It does contain $282,000 for the city of Encinitas, he noted.)

“It’s a realistic mitigation that everyone can agree on,” Trettin said.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Mainly Mozart's masterful melange

A consistent level of musical excellence that is unrivaled anywhere
Next Article

Dahmer's Diner, Nico, Deadheads, Paul Williams

Goth rock, Moby Grape on the street, Elvis in 1977, Stone Temple fracas, Charles McPherson, flamenco insiders
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Drinks All Around — Bartenders' drink recipes Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Outdoors — Weekly changes in flora and fauna Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Street Style — San Diego streets have style Surf Diego — Real stories from those braving the waves Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close