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Qualcomm, which announced it would be laying off 15 percent of its workforce in July, is now reducing its full-time head count and making "a significant reduction of our temporary workforce," according to a statement made to the Reader. "We are in the process of notifying employees. We haven't provided a more specific breakdown."

Meanwhile, bitter posts are going up on thelayoff.com. Here's one from today: "Kids, we will need to cancel our country club membership since I got my layoff notice from Qualcomm this week. Honey, you need to go back to work since I am not sure what work I can find now that still pays six figures."

Here's another from today: "If rumors are true, [Human Resources] and management should be honest and tell people NOW. But again, expecting caring behavior from these people is just plain dumb!"

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Comments

Don Bauder Sept. 17, 2015 @ 2:56 p.m.

SAN DIEGO LAYOFFS TO BE 1,314. The number of San Diego layoffs by Qualcomm will be 1314, according to Heather Milne Barger of the San Diego Workforce Partnership. The company has 15,000 full-time, part-time and temporary employees in San Diego. Its total workforce is 31,300. Best, Don Bauder

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ImJustABill Sept. 17, 2015 @ 3:07 p.m.

There are rumors of a 2nd phase of layoffs in Jan-Feb. Any word on that?

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Don Bauder Sept. 17, 2015 @ 3:56 p.m.

QUALCOMM LAYOFFS WILL BEGIN ABOUT NOVEMBER 20, 2015. Qualcomm has just filed its required Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act (WARN) notice. It states that layoffs will begin about November 20.

Here are the entities that will be affected by layoffs: Qualcomm, Inc.; Qualcomm Technologies; Qualcomm Atheros; Qualcomm Innovation Center; Qualcomm Connected Experiences; Qualcomm International; Qualcomm Life; Qualcomm Labs; Qualcomm Education, and Pixtronix.

Here are the addresses where there will be local layoffs: In Carlsbad, 2016 Palomar Airport Road, Suite 190; in San Diego: 10555 Sorrento Valley Road; 9685 Scranton Road; 6262 Lusk Boulevard; 10160 Pacific Mesa Boulevard.

5775 Morehouse Drive; 10185 McKellar Court; 5751 Pacific Center Boulevard; 5580 Morehouse Drive; 6965 Lusk Boulevard; 9940 Barnes Canyon Road; 10945 Vista Sorrento Parkway; 5717 Pacific Center Boulevard; 10001 Pacific Heights Boulevard.

5770 Morehouse Drive; 9950 Barnes Canyon Road; 10145 Pacific Heights Boulevard; 6455 Lusk Boulevard; 5565 Morehouse Drive; 5745 Pacific Center Boulevard; 9605 Scranton Road; 9393 Waples Street; 5880 Oberlin Drive; 5375 Mira Sorrento Place; 5355 Mira Sorrento Place; 4243 Campus Point Court; 10445 Pacific Center Court.

10065 Barnes Canyon Road; 4835 Eastgate Mall; 5525 Morehouse Drive; 5545 Morehouse Drive; 5665 Morehouse Drive; 5788 Pacific Center Boulevard; 5535 Morehouse Drive; 5764 Pacific Center Boulevard; 5505 Morehouse Drive; 5890 Pacific Center Boulevard; 9380 Waples Street; 10190 McKellar Court; 5555 Morehouse Drive; 5808 Pacific Center Boulevard; 5737 Pacific Center Boulevard and 5828 Pacific Center Boulevard.

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Don Bauder Sept. 17, 2015 @ 3:57 p.m.

ImJustABill: I have heard nothing about layoffs Jan.-Feb. I will post something if I heard anything reliable. Best, Don Bauder

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ImJustABill Sept. 18, 2015 @ 6:49 a.m.

There seems to be a lot of rumors, many posted on thelayoff.com indicating that this week's RIF is only phase 1. Nothing concrete yet.

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Don Bauder Sept. 18, 2015 @ 6:55 a.m.

ImJustABill: A big layoff like this will always generate rumors of another big layoff coming. Best, Don Bauder

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ImJustABill Sept. 18, 2015 @ 9:31 a.m.

My experience has been there's usually fire when there's smoke. If you want to completely write off everyones' posts as unverified rumors of course that's your perogative and may most appropriate from a journalistic perspective. But I think the rumors provide useful information and when all the rumors are trending one way they are usually correct.

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Don Bauder Sept. 18, 2015 @ 6:49 p.m.

ImJustABill: Maybe you haven't noticed: I do print rumors, as long as they are plausible and labeled as rumor. Many journalists do not print rumors. I do. I don't know any other San Diego journalist who has quoted from Thelayoff.com website, although some may have and I just haven't come across their work. Best, Don Bauder

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Twister Sept. 18, 2015 @ 10:40 p.m.

As long as you strongly qualify the quote and your statement as well as follow up, that's a perfectly valid practice. In fact, I consider all news to be rumor.

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ImJustABill Sept. 19, 2015 @ 5:31 a.m.

That's not a bad way of looking at the news. Sometimes, depending on the source, one could even look at the news as being more pure marketing and PR. Like maybe a hotel magnate who calls himself "Daddy" or "Papa" or some silly nickname like that buys a local newspaper to help shore up political power and influence.

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Don Bauder Sept. 19, 2015 @ 7 p.m.

ImJustABill: There is no doubt that much that is called "news" is propaganda, and not just in countries such as Russia. It's true in the U.S., too, although nowhere near as often as in Russia and many other countries. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Sept. 19, 2015 @ 8 a.m.

Twister: It seems to me to say that "all news is rumor" is a bit all-inclusive. The score of yesterday's Padres game is news, but it is not rumor. Best, Don Bauder

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Twister Sept. 19, 2015 @ 7:46 p.m.

I CONSIDER all news to be rumor; I did not proclaim that "all news is rumor". In fact I consider everything provisional, especially my own ideas. Please be careful, in your reporting, to quote your sources accurately, and not jump to contusions based on "facts" not in evidence. Otherwise, some schmuck might believe that you are spreading rumors and slandering, nay, libeling, your source. You'll hear from my liarywers in the morning. ~(;>)

Best, Tw

PS: Somebody might correct a beisbol score; misteaks happen. True, the report might be accurate in the sense that the ump made a bad call, so the reporting could simultaneously be correct but the information reported wrong.

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Don Bauder Sept. 20, 2015 @ 7:18 a.m.

Twister: I am chastised. I will never jump to contusions again. I have had too many contusions in this life. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Sept. 17, 2015 @ 4:07 p.m.

BITTER COMMENTS INTENSIFY. Acerbic comments on thelayoff.com are piling up. One says, "Do you know any VP, Director or Sr. Director that got laid off yesterday or today?"

And another, which shows the bitter feelings about the combined $118 million 2014 pay (some deferred) of Paul Jacobs and CEO Mollenkopf: "Qualcomm looted by international elites. Paul Jacobs made $57 million in 2014, up from $20 million in 2013, Qualcomm is being looted....The elite Jacobs family cares more about Israel and China than American middle class workers." Best, Don Bauder

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ImJustABill Sept. 17, 2015 @ 7:13 p.m.

Another thing that seems like a bad PR / insensitive timing is the number of M/A announcements this week for QCOM. You would think they could have waited another week to make announcements of spending millions of dollars for companies like SJsemi and Ikanos

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Don Bauder Sept. 17, 2015 @ 7:17 p.m.

ImJustABill: Yes, that was bad timing. Best, Don Bauder

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Ponzi Sept. 17, 2015 @ 8 p.m.

FYI "The Range Rover Sentinel is certified to VR8 standard against ballistic threats by QinetiQ, which means it can withstand 7.62 mm high-velocity, armor-piercing incendiary rounds, 15 kg (33 lb) TNT explosions, and DM51 grenades going off both beneath the floor and on the roof. In addition, there's an anti-tamper exhaust, a self-sealing fuel tank, and an auxiliary back-up battery with a split charging system."

Just an FYI, these bastards at Qualcomm may need to consider investing in this kind of vehicle. In fact it is interesting how the US market is now the leading consumer of bomb/bullet proof vehicles... as the rich get richer, the rich get more paranoid. And they should be. Because revolutions start slowly, but surely.

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Don Bauder Sept. 17, 2015 @ 9:07 p.m.

Ponzi: That thought occurred immediately to me, too. Such weaponry could be used against domestic protests. Look at the Occupy movement -- brutally thwarted with equipment the federal government supplied to local constabularies. Best, Don Bauder

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ImJustABill Sept. 17, 2015 @ 9:53 p.m.

I've heard in Brazil wealthy people do travel in vehicles like that due to fear of kidnapping and crime. It's one problem in societies with a large ratio of income from the upper classes to the lower classes. I don't think the USA is at this point yet but USA income distribution is trending to a larger ratio from upper to lower classes.

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Don Bauder Sept. 18, 2015 @ 6:58 a.m.

ImJustABill: Yes, the superrich must consider the consequences of the wide and widening wealth/income gap. An assassination of a prominent plutocrat could set off a very bad chain reaction. Best, Don Bauder

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KrimsonKing Sept. 18, 2015 @ 12:06 a.m.

I have a friend that works in the main building (N). The top guys are on the 10th floor and this friend tells me there is a large, burly guard greeting all visitors to that floor. Only place where Q have posted a guard, to my knowledge.

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Don Bauder Sept. 18, 2015 @ 7:02 a.m.

KrimsonKing: That is interesting, and also quite scary. My guess is that in part it is a consequence of the company paying a combined $118 million (much of it deferred) to the two top executives last year. It is waving a red flag in front of a bull. Best, Don Bauder

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MURPHYJUNK Sept. 18, 2015 @ 2:01 p.m.

as to the "burly" guard, unless there is some kind of weapons scanning system at the ground floor, it would be a case of the bigger they are , the harder they fall.

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Don Bauder Sept. 18, 2015 @ 6:53 p.m.

Muprhyjunk: I don't know if Qualcomm employees have to go through a screener before entering the building. If the company has no such system, perhaps it should think about getting one until the layoff resentment blows off. Best, Don Bauder

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KrimsonKing Sept. 20, 2015 @ 3:14 p.m.

No metal detector, last I heard. But the guard is probably put there to buy time for the big boys, as a human shield. I think he's been there for a while, first heard about him this last spring.

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Don Bauder Sept. 20, 2015 @ 8:42 p.m.

KrimsonKing: I would surmise the same thing-- the goon is there to protect top management, which is vulnerable because of vastly excessive compensation. Best, Don Bauder

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Ponzi Sept. 20, 2015 @ 8:26 p.m.

I saw this 20 years ago. I worked at Boeing in a Seattle suburb and the third floor to the building was locked down. In the elevator you needed a key card, the stairs were locked for that floor. Only invited people were allowed. I always thought they were afraid of union thugs. That was 20 years ago, maybe their fears were correct. Then they moved their headquarters to Chicago. If corruption was their concern, they certainly moved right into the center of it.

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Don Bauder Sept. 20, 2015 @ 8:50 p.m.

Ponzi: Boeing was bribed to move its headquarters to Chicago. I have a faint memory that another city was in the running, and it might have been in Texas. Actually, I don't think there are compelling reasons to separate the headquarters and the working stiffs.

Many years ago, Wickes moved its management to San Diego, leaving the rest of the company freezing in Michigan. Wickes found it couldn't manage the company under this arrangement. Gateway, the one-time computer maker, moved its top management to San Diego and left the rest of the company freezing in the Midwest. Gateway collapsed, as Wickes did, but I don't know whether it had a difficult time managing the company from a long distance. Best, Don Bauder

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AlexClarke Sept. 18, 2015 @ 6:36 a.m.

I suspect that many of those laid off will have a hard time finding "in-kind" jobs. The "good news" is that low wage part time no benefits jobs will be available due to the "retail season". Happy Thanksgiving and Merry Christmas from Qualcomm

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Don Bauder Sept. 18, 2015 @ 7:05 a.m.

AlexClarke: According to my last interview several weeks ago, the San Diego Workforce Partnership believes that those laid off by Qualcomm can be absorbed into the San Diego workforce. However, that remains to be seen. Best, Don Bauder

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Ponzi Sept. 20, 2015 @ 8:28 p.m.

Target and Walmart are always on the lookout for people they can "absorb" that know a little bit about high tech stuff.

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Don Bauder Sept. 20, 2015 @ 8:52 p.m.

Ponzi: Back to working for extremely low wages, selling China-made products to people whose only consideration is price. Best, Don Bauder

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jnojr Sept. 18, 2015 @ 3:14 p.m.

"But I can never find another job that pays that much!" A sure sign you were already overpaid.

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Don Bauder Sept. 18, 2015 @ 6:54 p.m.

jnojr: That is an intriguing observation. Best, Don Bauder

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ImJustABill Sept. 18, 2015 @ 9:22 p.m.

??? Where is that quote? I didn't see it on either this page or thelayoff.com ???

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Don Bauder Sept. 19, 2015 @ 8:02 a.m.

ImJustABill: Which quote are you talking about? Best, Don Bauder

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ImJustABill Sept. 20, 2015 @ 8:58 a.m.

jnojr's post."But I can never find another job that pays that much!"

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Don Bauder Sept. 20, 2015 @ 2:42 p.m.

ImJustABill: I think jnojr was paraphrasing somebody's quote. Best, Don Bauder

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ImJustABill Sept. 20, 2015 @ 7:49 p.m.

jnojr's point may have been that layed off QCOM employees are in high demand and will have no problem finding comparable jobs elsewhere. Or it may have been that QCOM employees have all been overpaid. Or maybe it was something else. I don't really know for sure what the point was.

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Don Bauder Sept. 20, 2015 @ 8:57 p.m.

ImJustABill:Telecom wages are high. Some ex-Qualcomm employees will find jobs in San Diego. Others surely won't.

Some industries are peripatetic by nature -- workers move from city to city as jobs open up. Construction is one. Aerospace/defense is another. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Sept. 21, 2015 @ 7:46 a.m.

ImJustABill: Telecom/chip jobs are often hard to find. Best, Don Bauder

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Ponzi Sept. 20, 2015 @ 8:43 p.m.

I asked Mike Freeman at the UT to do some real reporting and not just parrot QCOM announcements. Let's see what he does. Did the H-1B employees get the boot first? Or did the Americans get tossed while the Indians stayed on? And why is Qualcomm India still posting job opportunities as late at yesterday?

Globalization is a challenge, but good corporate citizens could help with mitigating some of the pain that globalization is placing on Americans. It doesn't help that Obama is signing more free trade pacts while our country is still recovering from the great recession. It doesn't help when the Republicans have charlatans like Carly Fiorina who is gaining in polls mostly because she is more articulate and skilled at using boardroom language to mesmerize the GOP who have not heard an articulate person in years.

We have a GOP candidate who probably hired more H-1B's than any US corporation and then lay off 30,000 employees. HP is bigger in Asia and India than in the US. Carly was fired for being a horrible leader, and now she is ranked behind Donald Trump. Yes, the world should laugh at us.

While the Ketchup King Kerry declares we should import a quarter of a million "refugees" from Syria, while he can hide in his gated homes.... We know that these middle east refugees usually become welfare collectors for life. Just look at El Cajon. What a mess. And Kerry wants to bring more unemployable "men" to our country.

All i can say is that I am glad I am in the age group of "between 60 and deceased" because this country is being mismanaged and it is heading for a revolution if people want to keep America to the specs it was designed for and the hope that it once had for its people. We complain about the Mexicans, who actually are hard workers, yet sit by while our government shoves a million welfare collecting refugees up our asses.

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Don Bauder Sept. 20, 2015 @ 9:01 p.m.

Ponzi: It is rumored that the H-1bs survived, but I haven't gotten confirmation of that. Best, Don Bauder

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KrimsonKing Sept. 20, 2015 @ 10:31 p.m.

Fact: one department hired around thirty engineers in the last twelve month period; all had either Chinese or Indian names. This figure was arrived at by simply counting the "Please welcome____ to our department..." emails. Surprisingly, two were even added after the public layoff announcement. At least three middle-aged white males made the layoff list from this same department. A developing story, obviously, because a very tight lid is being kept on this list.

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Don Bauder Sept. 21, 2015 @ 7:50 a.m.

KrimsonKing: Qualcomm will not give details on employees affected by the layoffs, so it is not clear if H-1Bs were spared. From posts on thelayoff.com site, it appears they may have been. I have queries out. Best, Don Bauder

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ImJustABill Sept. 22, 2015 @ 4:06 a.m.

King - from what you know were most of the individual layoff decisions left up to lower level management? Did the layoff decisions boil down to one's performance review or was it more complicated than that?

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Don Bauder Sept. 22, 2015 @ 12:24 p.m.

ImJustABill: Qualcomm announced that 15 percent of employees would be cut. So right there, power was taken away from the executives down the line. I would guess that top management told managers how many people they had to lay off, and then let them decide where the axes would fall -- with some exceptions, of course. Best, Don Bauder

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KrimsonKing Sept. 22, 2015 @ 9:12 p.m.

ImJustABill- Some who got cut had high review ratings and even had received performance awards. But it's appearing that cronyism and tribal behavior had an influence as well. I think Don has it fairly accurate as to how the decision-making was delegated. Seems the director and VP level had to do final approval. In the cases I stated above, the director did the notifying.

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Don Bauder Sept. 23, 2015 @ 3:10 p.m.

KrimsonKing: I am not surprised that some employees with high review ratings, who had been recipients of performance awards, got axed. That happens even in well-managed companies.

It's possible that an A+ employee was in a job that was being eliminated, or at a location where 80 to 90 percent of employees were cut. Best, Don Bauder

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ImJustABill Sept. 21, 2015 @ 6:57 p.m.

My guess is that QCOM will not report the H1B numbers unless they are required to by law.

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Don Bauder Sept. 22, 2015 @ 12:25 p.m.

ImJustABill: That would be a good guess, in my opinion. Best, Don Bauder

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