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Environmentalists to Governor Brown: stop fracking California

Nicole Peill Moelter of San Diego 350
Nicole Peill Moelter of San Diego 350

Environmental activists assembled by San Diego 350 gathered in Ocean Beach on Saturday morning to distribute petitions and create a mural the group hopes to send to Governor Jerry Brown in an attempt to lobby for an executive order banning the practice of hydraulic fracturing, commonly known as "fracking," within the state of California.

In the fracking process, highly pressurized water, mixed with sand and an undisclosed blend of acidic chemicals (oil industry representatives say the exact contents of fracking fluids are a trade secret), is blasted down a well site, breaking up rock formations beneath the surface and releasing the oil and/or natural gas contained within.

In July, the California Council on Science and Technology released a study on the environmental effects of hydraulic fracturing within the state, finding that while oil companies seem to be using techniques that cause less damage here than in other states, concerns remain that warrant further study and stronger monitoring standards.

Nicole Peill-Moelter of San Diego 350 says today's action, one of several planned across the state, is intended to draw attention to the results of that study.

Anti-fracking rally in Ocean Beach

"The study concerned various risks of fracking including earthquakes, irrigation of crops with fracking wastewater and other unknown

chemicals, and contamination of air and water supplies," said Peill-Moelter, standing in front of a "Stop Fracking CA" banner as adults and children took turns painting portions of the display.

"It's simple — we're asking Governor Brown to ban fracking in California. We feel that in comparing benefits and risks, the risks are much higher to Californians."

She says that about 3000 signatures have been gathered locally as part of an ongoing public awareness campaign, and insists that existing and emerging green technologies offer a viable alternative to increasingly complex and energy-intensive means of extracting fossil fuels.

"We believe in solutions – replacement options for oil from fracking include renewable energy, electric vehicles, increased energy efficiency, better fuel efficiency in gas-burning cars, and expanded use of biofuels."

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Nicole Peill Moelter of San Diego 350
Nicole Peill Moelter of San Diego 350

Environmental activists assembled by San Diego 350 gathered in Ocean Beach on Saturday morning to distribute petitions and create a mural the group hopes to send to Governor Jerry Brown in an attempt to lobby for an executive order banning the practice of hydraulic fracturing, commonly known as "fracking," within the state of California.

In the fracking process, highly pressurized water, mixed with sand and an undisclosed blend of acidic chemicals (oil industry representatives say the exact contents of fracking fluids are a trade secret), is blasted down a well site, breaking up rock formations beneath the surface and releasing the oil and/or natural gas contained within.

In July, the California Council on Science and Technology released a study on the environmental effects of hydraulic fracturing within the state, finding that while oil companies seem to be using techniques that cause less damage here than in other states, concerns remain that warrant further study and stronger monitoring standards.

Nicole Peill-Moelter of San Diego 350 says today's action, one of several planned across the state, is intended to draw attention to the results of that study.

Anti-fracking rally in Ocean Beach

"The study concerned various risks of fracking including earthquakes, irrigation of crops with fracking wastewater and other unknown

chemicals, and contamination of air and water supplies," said Peill-Moelter, standing in front of a "Stop Fracking CA" banner as adults and children took turns painting portions of the display.

"It's simple — we're asking Governor Brown to ban fracking in California. We feel that in comparing benefits and risks, the risks are much higher to Californians."

She says that about 3000 signatures have been gathered locally as part of an ongoing public awareness campaign, and insists that existing and emerging green technologies offer a viable alternative to increasingly complex and energy-intensive means of extracting fossil fuels.

"We believe in solutions – replacement options for oil from fracking include renewable energy, electric vehicles, increased energy efficiency, better fuel efficiency in gas-burning cars, and expanded use of biofuels."

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Comments
11

Oh c'mon, these folks can't be serious? Now Fracking is somehow bad? Let's just kill all energy sources and live of the land in a pup tent then......FRACKING has never ever been proven to do anything but provide virtually limitless sources of clean energy yet now these folks are trying to pull a Global Cooling/Global Warming/Climate Change fraud on this too? That is pathetic.

Aug. 1, 2015

Earthquakes in Kansas say your wrong.

Aug. 1, 2015

I was raised in OK, and we never had earthquakes back then.

Aug. 2, 2015

There is strong evidence that fracking can pollute aquifers and that the chemicals used in fracking are carcinogenic. The recent swarm of earthquakes in Oklahoma proves there are immediate consequences to populations. The byproducts of fracking are hazardous and disposal is problematic.

Aug. 2, 2015

Define "limitless sources"

Aug. 2, 2015

How does selling ice cream stop fracking in CA? Please explain.

Aug. 2, 2015

So how does spamming the comments here, help?

Aug. 2, 2015

What the frack?

Aug. 2, 2015

Today, they screech, "Stop fracking! Stop drilling! Stop refining!" Tomorrow, they bleat "Gas prices are too high! Evil oil companies are gouging us, government should punish them with more regulations and taxes!"

Aug. 3, 2015

Quit fracking around.

Aug. 3, 2015

Trust me. I'm an expert. Fracking is the best thing that will ever happen to you. Once you've been fracked, you'll never go back.

Aug. 3, 2015

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