Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Situation abnormal — all fracked up

"They're taking hydrochloric acid and shooting it into the ground."

Micah Mitrosky
Micah Mitrosky

Environmental activists packed a meeting hall at King-Chavez Community High School downtown on Monday night, January 12, for the first stop of the California Crossroads Tour, meant to raise awareness and pressure state government to take action toward banning the practice of hydraulic fracturing mining (known as "fracking") and continue to move toward renewable energy sources for power generation.

"People are getting poisoned by fracking," said David Braun, representing Californians Against Fracking. "People are getting poisoned by urban oil drilling, by living next to oil refineries. And they're expanding refineries, expanding fracking — they're taking hydrochloric acid and shooting it into the ground to melt away rock, we're so desperate for oil."

Despite the rush to expand fracking wells across the country, Braun and others say it's an inefficient process, requiring the equivalent of a barrel of oil's worth of energy to extract five barrels from the ground. Joy Williams of the Environmental Health Coalition said that up to 2000 local trips by trucks transporting equipment, water, and chemicals were involved in the drilling of a single well. As much as two million gallons of water is used daily for existing fracking operations within the state, despite ongoing severe drought conditions.

It's not just Central California and its massive Monterey Shale gas and oil deposits that will be affected by mining operations, activist José Brao said — a massive liquefied natural gas storage and processing facility near Ensenada, Energia Costa Azul, was built to process up to one billion cubic feet of gas per day, much of it shipped through San Diego County via existing pipelines.

"There may be a political fence" along the border, says Brao, "but we share the same air, the same watershed, and there's plenty of pollution flowing back across generated by U.S. corporations who've set up shop in Mexico."

Micah Mitrosky, representing the local electrical workers' union, says progress is being made — in 2013, the most recent year for which statistics are available, union members logged 1.6 million hours working on renewable-energy projects, roughly a quarter of all hours worked that year. Not counting a considerable body of work by non-union contractors, over 1000 megawatts of renewable-power generation has been installed locally in recent years (roughly enough to replace one of the two defunct nuclear reactors at San Onofre).

The labor body is lobbying for more investment in geothermal power, which can generate clean energy around the clock, unlike solar power, and for power-storage projects that would make expanded adoption of renewable energy more feasible.

The tour will continue through California in coming weeks, culminating with a March for Climate Leadership in Oakland on February 7.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Moved to tears by Dave’s Hot Chicken

Nashville hot chicken ranges from no spice, to hot, to the indemnified “reaper”
Micah Mitrosky
Micah Mitrosky

Environmental activists packed a meeting hall at King-Chavez Community High School downtown on Monday night, January 12, for the first stop of the California Crossroads Tour, meant to raise awareness and pressure state government to take action toward banning the practice of hydraulic fracturing mining (known as "fracking") and continue to move toward renewable energy sources for power generation.

"People are getting poisoned by fracking," said David Braun, representing Californians Against Fracking. "People are getting poisoned by urban oil drilling, by living next to oil refineries. And they're expanding refineries, expanding fracking — they're taking hydrochloric acid and shooting it into the ground to melt away rock, we're so desperate for oil."

Despite the rush to expand fracking wells across the country, Braun and others say it's an inefficient process, requiring the equivalent of a barrel of oil's worth of energy to extract five barrels from the ground. Joy Williams of the Environmental Health Coalition said that up to 2000 local trips by trucks transporting equipment, water, and chemicals were involved in the drilling of a single well. As much as two million gallons of water is used daily for existing fracking operations within the state, despite ongoing severe drought conditions.

It's not just Central California and its massive Monterey Shale gas and oil deposits that will be affected by mining operations, activist José Brao said — a massive liquefied natural gas storage and processing facility near Ensenada, Energia Costa Azul, was built to process up to one billion cubic feet of gas per day, much of it shipped through San Diego County via existing pipelines.

"There may be a political fence" along the border, says Brao, "but we share the same air, the same watershed, and there's plenty of pollution flowing back across generated by U.S. corporations who've set up shop in Mexico."

Micah Mitrosky, representing the local electrical workers' union, says progress is being made — in 2013, the most recent year for which statistics are available, union members logged 1.6 million hours working on renewable-energy projects, roughly a quarter of all hours worked that year. Not counting a considerable body of work by non-union contractors, over 1000 megawatts of renewable-power generation has been installed locally in recent years (roughly enough to replace one of the two defunct nuclear reactors at San Onofre).

The labor body is lobbying for more investment in geothermal power, which can generate clean energy around the clock, unlike solar power, and for power-storage projects that would make expanded adoption of renewable energy more feasible.

The tour will continue through California in coming weeks, culminating with a March for Climate Leadership in Oakland on February 7.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Luna Bay Booch's San Diego origin story

Woman owned hard kombucha brand brewed elsewhere, now sold locally
Next Article

Customer complaint chases bullying Starbucks barista from corona-crazed coffee collective

Star-BUCKS
Comments
2

so fracking has a 5:1 ratio. what are the ratios for "renewable" energy sources? What are those sources?

Jan. 16, 2015

So fracking uses acid, can the acid end up in residential well water ? Great more tax dollars filtered through lawsuits under a claim of political negligence.

Fracking uses up to 2 million gallons of water a day! FYI- The city threatened to fine people for using their garden hose with out a nossel

This crap will never change until every current politicians is removed from office.
Is there any honest people left in the world?

Feb. 10, 2015

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close