4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Moody's newspaper outlook grim

Can new ownership of a nonprofit U-T maintain a positive perspective?

The newspaper outlook is downcast, at least through next year, according to a new report by Moody's Investors Service. Because civic leader Malin Burnham would like to raise investor funds, take over the U-T, and make it into a nonprofit, the report will be "must" reading for some San Diego moneybags.

Digital subscriptions will plateau quickly, says Moody's. Digital is the fastest-growing business for publishers, but the growth will slow this year and next. The share of newspaper and magazine advertising will continue to drop. Consumers will continue shifting their eyes from newsprint to social media, digital video, and the like.

This is "no surprise," says Jim Romenesko, media commentator on jimromenesko.com. "The recent wave of publishing spinoffs and divestitures sets the stage for further industry consolidation," says Romensko, commenting on Moody's findings. "Moody's sees little evidence that the [United States] newspaper and magazine industry will generate sufficient income from digital subscriber fees, non-print advertising or marketing services over the next year to offset stress on print volumes and pricing."

According to the Guardian, "Moody's senior credit officer Carl Salas wrote in the report: 'Companies will make some gains against this decline from ongoing investments in digital platforms, but not enough to prevent most publishing companies' performance from eroding.'"

The Los Angeles Register — launched last April by Orange County Register publisher Aaron Kushner — will cease publication immediately, Kushner announced yesterday (September 22). When Kushner bought the Orange County Register, he stunned the newspaper industry by hiring reporters, adding sections, buying the Riverside Press-Enterprise, and then attacking the Los Angeles market. Recently, however, he has been doing what other publishers have done: laying off reporters and cutting back. The latest to go: his short-lived attempt to put a new paper in L.A., despite that market's problems.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

The four levels of retro Christmas

Embrace the absolutely terrifying yuletide traditions of medieval Europe
Next Article

The USS Midway’s stalwarts

It’s impossible not to think of Tom Brokaw’s phrase “Greatest generation” when you listen to the man talk.

The newspaper outlook is downcast, at least through next year, according to a new report by Moody's Investors Service. Because civic leader Malin Burnham would like to raise investor funds, take over the U-T, and make it into a nonprofit, the report will be "must" reading for some San Diego moneybags.

Digital subscriptions will plateau quickly, says Moody's. Digital is the fastest-growing business for publishers, but the growth will slow this year and next. The share of newspaper and magazine advertising will continue to drop. Consumers will continue shifting their eyes from newsprint to social media, digital video, and the like.

This is "no surprise," says Jim Romenesko, media commentator on jimromenesko.com. "The recent wave of publishing spinoffs and divestitures sets the stage for further industry consolidation," says Romensko, commenting on Moody's findings. "Moody's sees little evidence that the [United States] newspaper and magazine industry will generate sufficient income from digital subscriber fees, non-print advertising or marketing services over the next year to offset stress on print volumes and pricing."

According to the Guardian, "Moody's senior credit officer Carl Salas wrote in the report: 'Companies will make some gains against this decline from ongoing investments in digital platforms, but not enough to prevent most publishing companies' performance from eroding.'"

The Los Angeles Register — launched last April by Orange County Register publisher Aaron Kushner — will cease publication immediately, Kushner announced yesterday (September 22). When Kushner bought the Orange County Register, he stunned the newspaper industry by hiring reporters, adding sections, buying the Riverside Press-Enterprise, and then attacking the Los Angeles market. Recently, however, he has been doing what other publishers have done: laying off reporters and cutting back. The latest to go: his short-lived attempt to put a new paper in L.A., despite that market's problems.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Movie critic Duncan Shepherd answers critics, Vincente Minnelli, Robert Rossellini visit UCSD

Squeezing Cinemascope into a TV screen, San Diego's movie theaters on the line
Next Article

San Diego squeakers

Warner school district, Santee city council, Joel Anderson vs. Steve Vaus for county supervisor
Comments
22

They can't make much money publishing gibberish. UT publishing rights should be given up to SDSU. Kids are still truth tellers. Then they can move on to destroying the rest of Mission Valley with Manly mega projects.

Sept. 23, 2014

shirleyberan: Who says kids are truth tellers? The expression "Liar! Liar! Pants on fire!" was invented by kids, I would guess. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 23, 2014

I think Journalism Departments in all schools need to work on this--as well as work on ways for sloppy work to be eradicated. If only my sixth grade teacher could have been cloned...the world would know geography, grammar and spelling much better!

Yes, I jest, but we need to improve!

Sept. 23, 2014

eastlaker: One of the quality problems is that as newspaper revenue and earnings plunge, the papers hire younger and less talented people. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 23, 2014

Think about what you are saying Don. That's kids busting their parents.

Sept. 23, 2014

shirleyberan: Maybe it's kids mimicking their parents, who are also liars. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 23, 2014

Woodward was from Illinois, Bernstein from Washington. People here are scared stupid.

Sept. 23, 2014

shirleyberan: Had Woodward stayed in Illinois, he would have had plenty to write about -- like all those governors going to prison. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 23, 2014

My flag. About a year and a half ago, Superintendent Ed Brand had teachers terrified of losing their jobs. He had private investigators intimidating private citizens for speaking about injustices. They finally retired that criminal ass but he has gotten away with a lot.

Sept. 23, 2014

shirleyberan: It's nice to see somebody who ruled by terror brought down. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 23, 2014

Even though prognosticators say print is over, I don't think money matters as much as power, Don. The regular players of Burnham, Jacobs, Woolley and Price have been collaborating on civic enterprises and personal gain for years: how much more gratifying to hold a virtual media monopoly to effect their ambitions, including mayoral placement that has a future in state or federal halls. And since there is so much money floating around in the 1%, there doubtless are others who would be glad to join in the civil takeover. No more wild west Papa Doug. Smooth and cool. Add a new U-T to the collection of handmaidens VOSD, inewsource and KPBS/SDSU. It would be like a sweep of Park Place.

Sept. 23, 2014

monaghan: Interesting points. A number of months ago I was asking U-T people whether they thought Papa Doug wanted to sell the paper. The consensus then was that since he had demoted Lynch, effectively, and gotten rid of the huge TV losses, he would probably hold on since he enjoyed the power trip. In this case, the consensus was wrong, apparently. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 23, 2014

The descriptor "non-profit" is misleading. The fact that a business does or doesn't make more than it spends isn't at issue. "For profit" businesses lose money, famously. "Non-profits" have grossly overpaid executives, famously. The distinction is ownership, and non-profits have none. So Mr Burnham is trying to get people to give money to a terminal business that nobody will own. Just a mad step through the looking glass from current ownership. They will sell papers as long as they have the obit's and crossword, although there will soon be a day when the last crossword customer is in the obit's. That will be it for the UT.

Sept. 23, 2014

rehftmann: Good points. Yes, there are plenty of scams in the so-called nonprofit world -- particularly, grossly overpaid executives. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 23, 2014

In the heyday of print, news was served to people. These days people can select it from a buffet of blogs and news sources. They can tailor the news they consume to match their ideology. This is what is leading to the polarization and rift between the "conservatives" and "liberals." The internet has opened up information, but it has also introduced mass misinformation. The number of people who believe in conspiracy theories is way up from years ago because the internet permits more ignorant and uninformed people to connect with each other. There is no editor, moderator or fact checking on the majority of the information. In fact, the fall of the printed press is doing a big disservice to the poor because there is no gatekeeper anymore to filter the propaganda. The lack of morals and professionalism in journalism occurring from the fall of the profits of printed press invite psychopaths like Manchester to use wealth to acquire these troubled papers to use for their own personal agendas.

Sept. 23, 2014

You said it! The UT is nothing more than a one percenter toy.

Sept. 24, 2014

AlexClarke: So true -- one percenter toy. But still people swallow the propaganda. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 24, 2014

Ponzi: It is true that anybody can toss anything on the Internet. Some will believe the garbage, no matter how outrageous. But mainstream media are becoming more bifurcated, too. Conservatives can watch Fox. Liberals can watch MSNBC.

There is nothing new about this. In the early days of newspapers in America, publications were quite slanted. One reason is that there would be a number of competing papers in a market. One paper would serve one market and another would serve the other market. Ever wonder why so many papers have the name Democrat or Republican in them? It's an historical artifact. Later, economics dictated that papers gives the news more objectively -- with many exceptions, of course.

Now, as you point out, the Internet is once again driving a wedge between ideologies. Rightists have their own publications, leftists have theirs. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 24, 2014

Gee Don I haven't seen the liberal MSNBC denounce a war in the 21st century and I can't express any faith that they did so in the 20th century either.

Sept. 24, 2014

MichaelValentine: MSNBC had a great program on how the only reason we invaded Iraq in the George W. Bush years was for oil. Nothing else but oil -- so true. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 24, 2014

There seems to be a conspiracy of silence.

Sept. 24, 2014

shirleyberan: There is a conspiracy of silence -- on many topics. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 24, 2014

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close