4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Peaceful bees forcibly removed from Ocean Beach

Park and Rec could wait no longer for the insects to move along

While the rest of the country was getting ready for the Fourth of July, city parks employees worked to remove a few hundred bees that had collected under a picnic table at Brighton Street Park in Ocean Beach.

The bees, which may have chosen the spot to maintain warmth and gather strength before swarming off in search of a suitable place to build a hive, were unknowingly awaiting a visit from an exterminator on the afternoon of July 3.

The bees had been reported to the San Diego Parks and Recreation Department June 27. With the beginning of Independence Day less than 24 hours away, Park and Rec could wait no longer for the insects to move along of their own accord. A city-contracted pest-control vendor had to be called in to take out the critters, said Dan Daneri, regional supervisor for shoreline parks.

“I was hoping the sprinklers would come on at night and chase them out,” Daneri said.

It’s common behavior for the insects to dogpile themselves into the shape of a mound, but they’re usually not building a hive, said Kurt Schuster of Pestmaster Services, the vendor that arrived late in the afternoon. A swarm that forms a ball and attaches itself to a picnic table, meter box, or light pole is usually between hives. This can happen for a variety of reasons — perhaps things got too crowded at the old hive. Typically, they rest up for a few days and fly off to build a new abode, Schuster said.

City crews encounter these great balls of bees three or four times a year, Daneri said. “They’re usually hanging on the side of a palm tree or something. They’re not defending a hive, so they’re in a peaceful state.”

Daneri acknowledged some may fret over the loss of the bees, but the city has no other options, he said. A contracted exterminator has insurance and bears the liability in case something goes awry, he said.

Schuster said he sprayed the swarm with pyrethrin, a natural organic compound derived from the chrysanthemum flower that attacks the nervous systems of bees. It causes them to freeze and land on a plastic bag, where they can be wrapped up and collected. The chemical is not harmful to the environment, he said.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Remembering Louis Procaccino

“He always had food in his pockets”

While the rest of the country was getting ready for the Fourth of July, city parks employees worked to remove a few hundred bees that had collected under a picnic table at Brighton Street Park in Ocean Beach.

The bees, which may have chosen the spot to maintain warmth and gather strength before swarming off in search of a suitable place to build a hive, were unknowingly awaiting a visit from an exterminator on the afternoon of July 3.

The bees had been reported to the San Diego Parks and Recreation Department June 27. With the beginning of Independence Day less than 24 hours away, Park and Rec could wait no longer for the insects to move along of their own accord. A city-contracted pest-control vendor had to be called in to take out the critters, said Dan Daneri, regional supervisor for shoreline parks.

“I was hoping the sprinklers would come on at night and chase them out,” Daneri said.

It’s common behavior for the insects to dogpile themselves into the shape of a mound, but they’re usually not building a hive, said Kurt Schuster of Pestmaster Services, the vendor that arrived late in the afternoon. A swarm that forms a ball and attaches itself to a picnic table, meter box, or light pole is usually between hives. This can happen for a variety of reasons — perhaps things got too crowded at the old hive. Typically, they rest up for a few days and fly off to build a new abode, Schuster said.

City crews encounter these great balls of bees three or four times a year, Daneri said. “They’re usually hanging on the side of a palm tree or something. They’re not defending a hive, so they’re in a peaceful state.”

Daneri acknowledged some may fret over the loss of the bees, but the city has no other options, he said. A contracted exterminator has insurance and bears the liability in case something goes awry, he said.

Schuster said he sprayed the swarm with pyrethrin, a natural organic compound derived from the chrysanthemum flower that attacks the nervous systems of bees. It causes them to freeze and land on a plastic bag, where they can be wrapped up and collected. The chemical is not harmful to the environment, he said.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Five from the Fourth Annual Joyce Forum Jewish Short Film Festival

Short and sweet and sour
Next Article

Triangle-shaped in Solana Beach

The “manicured grounds” add a pop of color to an exterior that’s otherwise black, white
Comments
5

So, were the bees destroyed in the process? Seems that would be unnecessary as there are so many bee removal services available. Also, lots of news lately about the collapse of bee colonies, so I would think the extra steps required to not kill them would be viewed as worthwhile. I hope they were transferred and not destroyed. It's obvious they were only there to for the much anticipated, but legally forbidden marshmallow feast.

July 3, 2014

I think you should check what the stats are about % of bees here are Africanized. 80% I have heard recently. When they swarm into a tree in your yard you got a killer problem.

July 3, 2014

And if you haven't seen them swarming by the thousands, it's Hitchcock scary, over my backyard out of nowhere, without warning, beelining into a hole in my tree, they aren't sweet little honey bees, but killers if you piss 'em off, so I had them knocked off.

July 3, 2014

These weren't Africanized bees, these were peaceful bees. I'm sorry more of an effort wasn't made to remove them alive.

http://www.sandiegobeekeepingsociety.com/

July 4, 2014

I'm sorry about the bees. Maybe somebody shoulda/coulda saved them.

July 7, 2014

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Drinks All Around — Bartenders' drink recipes Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Outdoors — Weekly changes in flora and fauna Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Street Style — San Diego streets have style Surf Diego — Real stories from those braving the waves Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close