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Scorsese’s fugazis

Cocaine trilogy, completed

Okay, now I'm king of the world!
Okay, now I'm king of the world!

Having never read Jordan Belfort’s autobiography, The Wolf of Wall Street — which forms the basis of Martin Scorsese’s latest, most outrageous essay on common denominators living the life of upscale, drug-enhanced, and power-infested businessmen to the manner born — I can’t be sure who came up with the idea of using a lion’s head as the emblem of the author’s real-life Stratton Oakmont brokerage firm. Surely a wolf would have been more appropriate, but were that the case, how could Marty have opened a Paramount Picture with the paradoxical roar of M-G-M’s Leo?

And so begins the winter of my contentedness. Three hours (His longest to date) of mad movie love, with stockbrokers replacing neck-breakers and Scorsese’s camera shoulder-charging the audience at full tilt.

Set to the tune of the Master’s metronome camera moves, Belfort’s (Leonardo DiCaprio) first day on the job in a strip-mall penny-stock shithole finds him delivering a master class on how to “sell garbage to garbage men.” The energy level in this scene and in Belfort’s hilarious third-act, time-released Quaalude crawl suggests the work of a director in his early 30s, not that of a man who just turned 71.

Movie

Wolf of Wall Street ****

thumbnail

Martin Scorsese’s latest, most outrageous essay on common denominators living the life of upscale, drug-enhanced, and power-infested businessmen to the manner born. Set to the tune of metronome camera moves, protagonist and unrepentant jerk Jordan Belfort’s (Leonardo DiCaprio) first day on the job in a strip-mall penny-stock shithole finds him delivering a master class on how to “sell garbage to garbage men.” The energy level in this scene and in Belfort’s hilarious third-act, time-released Quaalude crawl suggests the work of a director in his early 30s, not that of a man who just turned 71. Belfort is Scorsese’s ultimate surrogate auteur, an evangelical trafficker in power, preaching moxie to his ductile minions. But film remains a collaborative medium, and it would have been nice if screenwriter Terrence Winter hadn't written any scenes whose only purpose was to suck up to the director. Actorwise it’s Leo’s show, and the script calls for the actor to dominate every scene, leaving the supporting cast little to do but bounce off him. It's the weakest entry in Scorsese's cocaine trilogy — which began with <em>Goodfellas</em> and <em>Casino</em> — but running third in that company is no mean feat.

Find showtimes

Jordan Belfort is Scorsese’s ultimate surrogate auteur, an evangelical trafficker in power, preaching moxie to his ductile minions. Not only does he write copy for his cold-calling schlubs to pitch, Belfort provides expert direction on vocal inflection and line-reading, at times acting out their every move in advance for his otherwise stumped band of fallible fugazis. When the fledgling company expands to larger quarters, the new digs include a microphone and a stage from which a supercharged Belfort performs for the troops — regaling them with profane bursts of PMA and testimonials steeped in the art of sincerely insincere showbiz puffery.

But film remains a collaborative medium, and so the goodness isn’t quite uniform. The Sopranos and Boardwalk Empire scripter Terence Winter suffers much the same fate as did The Departed’s Oscar-winning scribe, William Monaghan. Dear Scorsese screenwriters: stop writing scenes the sole purpose of which is to suck up to Him. It’s one thing to subtly replace the two-strip Technicolor peas in The Aviator with a bowl of digitally color-corrected olives. But did we need another aircraft crash landing in the suburbs? Ditto a turbulent ride to Monaco on a larger scale version of the Bowden family houseboat. Nor do I accept the notion that this benighted band would know every lyric to the “Gobble Gobble” war chant from Tod Browning’s Freaks. When it comes to art, these jerk-offs’ idea of visual stimulation is watching Urkel reruns while waiting for the high to kick in.

In Marty’s satyricon, Ferraris change paint jobs faster than DeMille could ever bloody the waters. Drugs equal power, and a brief but concise history of methaqualone will leave those in the know itching for a pop. And where else but on the planet Scorsese will one find a Popeye spinach-hit sounding the alarm for a life-saving snort of blow? Well, coke me up!

DiCaprio’s collaborations with Mr. S have reached the point where I no longer miss De Niro. It’s Leo’s show, and the script calls for the actor to dominate every scene, leaving the supporting cast little to do but bounce off him. This year’s Vickie LaMotta, the traffic-stoppingly beautiful Margot Robbie, is all undressed with nowhere to go. (There is more exposed flesh on display in WOWS than in all of Marty’s previous features combined.) Beneath Jonah Hill’s hideous set of blindingly white Julius Kelp veneers and off-the-rack Easter pastels lurks a brilliant shade of darkness. As many times as I will see the film (I’m up to #3 and the damn thing hasn’t even opened yet) you will always hear my laugh whenever a derailed Rob Reiner interrupts his favorite TV show to field an unwanted phone call. George C. Scott couldn’t have done it any better.

WOWS concludes Marty’s cocaine trilogy that began with Goodfellas and Casino and adds a Quaalude chaser for good measure. Henry Hill winds up sequestered in a suburban tract house with a two-car garage, aka the American Dream. Ace Rothstein is the only one of Scorsese’s fictional Christ figures to be resurrected. Belfort’s punishment oddly fits the crime.

Jordan Belfort’s reward for time served is an infomercial, and unlike the curtain shot of The King of Comedy, this time the audience is live, not looking on from Rupert’s mental alcove. It’s this absence of a compelling clincher — a narrative twist-tie to put an “Amen” on it — that leaves it the weakest of the trio. But running third in that company is no small feat and as such, WOWS never fails to wow.

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Okay, now I'm king of the world!
Okay, now I'm king of the world!

Having never read Jordan Belfort’s autobiography, The Wolf of Wall Street — which forms the basis of Martin Scorsese’s latest, most outrageous essay on common denominators living the life of upscale, drug-enhanced, and power-infested businessmen to the manner born — I can’t be sure who came up with the idea of using a lion’s head as the emblem of the author’s real-life Stratton Oakmont brokerage firm. Surely a wolf would have been more appropriate, but were that the case, how could Marty have opened a Paramount Picture with the paradoxical roar of M-G-M’s Leo?

And so begins the winter of my contentedness. Three hours (His longest to date) of mad movie love, with stockbrokers replacing neck-breakers and Scorsese’s camera shoulder-charging the audience at full tilt.

Set to the tune of the Master’s metronome camera moves, Belfort’s (Leonardo DiCaprio) first day on the job in a strip-mall penny-stock shithole finds him delivering a master class on how to “sell garbage to garbage men.” The energy level in this scene and in Belfort’s hilarious third-act, time-released Quaalude crawl suggests the work of a director in his early 30s, not that of a man who just turned 71.

Movie

Wolf of Wall Street ****

thumbnail

Martin Scorsese’s latest, most outrageous essay on common denominators living the life of upscale, drug-enhanced, and power-infested businessmen to the manner born. Set to the tune of metronome camera moves, protagonist and unrepentant jerk Jordan Belfort’s (Leonardo DiCaprio) first day on the job in a strip-mall penny-stock shithole finds him delivering a master class on how to “sell garbage to garbage men.” The energy level in this scene and in Belfort’s hilarious third-act, time-released Quaalude crawl suggests the work of a director in his early 30s, not that of a man who just turned 71. Belfort is Scorsese’s ultimate surrogate auteur, an evangelical trafficker in power, preaching moxie to his ductile minions. But film remains a collaborative medium, and it would have been nice if screenwriter Terrence Winter hadn't written any scenes whose only purpose was to suck up to the director. Actorwise it’s Leo’s show, and the script calls for the actor to dominate every scene, leaving the supporting cast little to do but bounce off him. It's the weakest entry in Scorsese's cocaine trilogy — which began with <em>Goodfellas</em> and <em>Casino</em> — but running third in that company is no mean feat.

Find showtimes

Jordan Belfort is Scorsese’s ultimate surrogate auteur, an evangelical trafficker in power, preaching moxie to his ductile minions. Not only does he write copy for his cold-calling schlubs to pitch, Belfort provides expert direction on vocal inflection and line-reading, at times acting out their every move in advance for his otherwise stumped band of fallible fugazis. When the fledgling company expands to larger quarters, the new digs include a microphone and a stage from which a supercharged Belfort performs for the troops — regaling them with profane bursts of PMA and testimonials steeped in the art of sincerely insincere showbiz puffery.

But film remains a collaborative medium, and so the goodness isn’t quite uniform. The Sopranos and Boardwalk Empire scripter Terence Winter suffers much the same fate as did The Departed’s Oscar-winning scribe, William Monaghan. Dear Scorsese screenwriters: stop writing scenes the sole purpose of which is to suck up to Him. It’s one thing to subtly replace the two-strip Technicolor peas in The Aviator with a bowl of digitally color-corrected olives. But did we need another aircraft crash landing in the suburbs? Ditto a turbulent ride to Monaco on a larger scale version of the Bowden family houseboat. Nor do I accept the notion that this benighted band would know every lyric to the “Gobble Gobble” war chant from Tod Browning’s Freaks. When it comes to art, these jerk-offs’ idea of visual stimulation is watching Urkel reruns while waiting for the high to kick in.

In Marty’s satyricon, Ferraris change paint jobs faster than DeMille could ever bloody the waters. Drugs equal power, and a brief but concise history of methaqualone will leave those in the know itching for a pop. And where else but on the planet Scorsese will one find a Popeye spinach-hit sounding the alarm for a life-saving snort of blow? Well, coke me up!

DiCaprio’s collaborations with Mr. S have reached the point where I no longer miss De Niro. It’s Leo’s show, and the script calls for the actor to dominate every scene, leaving the supporting cast little to do but bounce off him. This year’s Vickie LaMotta, the traffic-stoppingly beautiful Margot Robbie, is all undressed with nowhere to go. (There is more exposed flesh on display in WOWS than in all of Marty’s previous features combined.) Beneath Jonah Hill’s hideous set of blindingly white Julius Kelp veneers and off-the-rack Easter pastels lurks a brilliant shade of darkness. As many times as I will see the film (I’m up to #3 and the damn thing hasn’t even opened yet) you will always hear my laugh whenever a derailed Rob Reiner interrupts his favorite TV show to field an unwanted phone call. George C. Scott couldn’t have done it any better.

WOWS concludes Marty’s cocaine trilogy that began with Goodfellas and Casino and adds a Quaalude chaser for good measure. Henry Hill winds up sequestered in a suburban tract house with a two-car garage, aka the American Dream. Ace Rothstein is the only one of Scorsese’s fictional Christ figures to be resurrected. Belfort’s punishment oddly fits the crime.

Jordan Belfort’s reward for time served is an infomercial, and unlike the curtain shot of The King of Comedy, this time the audience is live, not looking on from Rupert’s mental alcove. It’s this absence of a compelling clincher — a narrative twist-tie to put an “Amen” on it — that leaves it the weakest of the trio. But running third in that company is no small feat and as such, WOWS never fails to wow.

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Comments
13

It's a Lamborghini, not a Ferrari. Sorry, Marty. I'm Jewish. I don't know anything about cars.

Dec. 25, 2013

There's no Lam or Ferrari in the Old Testament or New. 80% of Catholic is the Old Testament. Think I'll check it out tomorrow.... In the old country.... Chicago

Dec. 26, 2013

Where have you been, Dotty, shacking up with Barney McNulty's widow? Good to have you back, sweetie.

Dec. 27, 2013

Finally saw Jackie Brown, Christmas day. The thing that made it was watching Robert De Niro smoking pipes and bongs.

Dec. 26, 2013

Don't wait until Christmas 2019 to get around to watching WOWS.

Dec. 27, 2013

I think Bobby's stock fell in Marty's eyes after that film.

Dec. 26, 2013

Weed is a no no.... Blow is a go go....

Dec. 26, 2013

You need a fistful of Lomotil, Dot.

Dec. 27, 2013

"DiCaprio’s collaborations with Mr. S have reached the point where I no longer miss De Niro."

Liar! Even so, I had many "how'd the director get the star to do that?" moments in this one. Highlights: a candle up the butt, Leo smacking his microphone on his head like he's an imperial Japanese soldier smacking a grenade against his helmet in "flowers of war" followed by making a lower-jaw pouting guerrilla face, opening his gull-winged car door with his foot and being dragged up, any and all spasm dancing and flexing his muscles in the middle of marital fight. All in all, a very enjoyable three hour movie. The only gripe (not a flaw) is we didn't see him interact with his wife and kid, so when he gets threatened with divorce we don't know why he's freaking out. Wayda'minute, that's a strength not a weakness! It cuts out all the faux-sweet bullcrap! This movie rocks and has a perfect cameo for Matthew McConaughey! P.S. readers: don't complain about spoilers, because all those highlights need to be seen in context to be believed....

Dec. 27, 2013

De Niro's collaborations with Jay Roach, Justin Zackham, and Matthew Vaughn have far surpassed anything he did with Marty. Would I like to see Marty and Bob reunited and it feels so good? Of course. But I no longer lose sleep over his absence.

Dec. 27, 2013

Forget directors. Could De Niro at least be reunited with a good screenplay for a change?

Dec. 27, 2013

He's developed an allergy.

Dec. 27, 2013

Plus it's easier these days to take the quick money, and phone in an average performance.

Dec. 28, 2013

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