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San Clemente East

Take time to look at the broad palmate leaves of the western sycamore while hiking in San Diego’s first natural park.
Take time to look at the broad palmate leaves of the western sycamore while hiking in San Diego’s first natural park.

In 1971, San Clemente Canyon became San Diego’s first officially dedicated natural park. It was rededicated as Marian R. Bear Memorial Park in 1979 for her role in preventing Highway 52 from being built in the San Clemente creek bed. She also helped in preserving Tecolote Canyon and passage of Proposition C, a $65 million open-space preservation plan for the acquisition of major parcels of park preserves within the City of San Diego. Mrs. Marian Bear was one of the city’s most active and persistent defenders of open-space preservation.

San Clemente East is centrally located with easy access to a riparian woodland habitat. This scarce environment is only meters in width, but with vegetation that is both dense and diverse. This is one of the most productive for wildlife, due to relatively abundant water and cold air drainage.

Start walking eastward on the dirt road toward I-805, crossing the creek bed that can be impassable during significant rain. Stay on the trail, as there is an abundance of poison oak growing among the riparian indicator species of sycamore, mule fat, and willows.

There are two south side trips to lengthen your walk; the first is Cobb Trail, an interesting shaded trail where at the end there are steps up to Cobb Drive. Walking up the steps and back add exercise before returning to the main trail. Another side trip follows high-voltage power lines up along an open trail to Conrad Avenue. Return to the main trail and continue east until reaching I-805, at which time, retrace your steps back to the parking lot.

Take time to look at the broad palmate leaves of the western sycamore (Platanus racemosa) and follow the molted light bark for perching birds and nests. Binoculars can help differentiate the two most common hawks found in the area.

Red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), the most common Buteo in North America, can be seen soaring on large broad wings or perched in sycamore trees. They hunt from perch or soaring position, catching rodents, small mammals, snakes, and rarely a bird. The three foot in diameter, large bulking platform type nest of sticks and twigs tends to be in more exposed sites, though reused by common ravens, great horned owls, and other hawks. Red-shouldered hawks (Buteo lineatus) mostly hunt from perch, catching rodents, insects, and small birds.

San Clemente Canyon joins the Rose Creek tributary near I-5 on its route to Mission Bay near the Kendall Frost Marsh. The 23,427-acre Rose Canyon Watershed that starts from runoff on the western slopes of Scripps Ranch goes through MCAS Miramar and joins with Rose and Stevenson Canyons and their tributaries. Mileage can be extended a number of ways: walk the three sections of San Clemente Canyon, adding Rose Canyon; side trips to Stanley Park; and even through a combination of trails and streets and the addition of Tecolote Canyon.

Canyoneers are San Diego Natural History Museum volunteers trained to lead interpretive nature walks that teach appreciation for the great outdoors. For a schedule of free public hikes, refer to the San Diego Natural History Museum website.

Distance from downtown San Diego: 12 miles. Allow 20 minutes driving time. From I-5 north, merge onto SR-52 east, exit on Genesee Avenue, then right again into the Marian Bear Park parking lot. Restrooms and water at trailhead.

Hiking length: 2.5 miles. Open year round for hikers and bicyclists. Dogs on a leash permitted. Best time to visit is Sunday mornings when traffic sounds are lowest. Rain can limit access.

Difficulty: Easy, with little elevation gain/loss. On the side of the trail you may occasionally see and need to avoid poison oak.

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Take time to look at the broad palmate leaves of the western sycamore while hiking in San Diego’s first natural park.
Take time to look at the broad palmate leaves of the western sycamore while hiking in San Diego’s first natural park.

In 1971, San Clemente Canyon became San Diego’s first officially dedicated natural park. It was rededicated as Marian R. Bear Memorial Park in 1979 for her role in preventing Highway 52 from being built in the San Clemente creek bed. She also helped in preserving Tecolote Canyon and passage of Proposition C, a $65 million open-space preservation plan for the acquisition of major parcels of park preserves within the City of San Diego. Mrs. Marian Bear was one of the city’s most active and persistent defenders of open-space preservation.

San Clemente East is centrally located with easy access to a riparian woodland habitat. This scarce environment is only meters in width, but with vegetation that is both dense and diverse. This is one of the most productive for wildlife, due to relatively abundant water and cold air drainage.

Start walking eastward on the dirt road toward I-805, crossing the creek bed that can be impassable during significant rain. Stay on the trail, as there is an abundance of poison oak growing among the riparian indicator species of sycamore, mule fat, and willows.

There are two south side trips to lengthen your walk; the first is Cobb Trail, an interesting shaded trail where at the end there are steps up to Cobb Drive. Walking up the steps and back add exercise before returning to the main trail. Another side trip follows high-voltage power lines up along an open trail to Conrad Avenue. Return to the main trail and continue east until reaching I-805, at which time, retrace your steps back to the parking lot.

Take time to look at the broad palmate leaves of the western sycamore (Platanus racemosa) and follow the molted light bark for perching birds and nests. Binoculars can help differentiate the two most common hawks found in the area.

Red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), the most common Buteo in North America, can be seen soaring on large broad wings or perched in sycamore trees. They hunt from perch or soaring position, catching rodents, small mammals, snakes, and rarely a bird. The three foot in diameter, large bulking platform type nest of sticks and twigs tends to be in more exposed sites, though reused by common ravens, great horned owls, and other hawks. Red-shouldered hawks (Buteo lineatus) mostly hunt from perch, catching rodents, insects, and small birds.

San Clemente Canyon joins the Rose Creek tributary near I-5 on its route to Mission Bay near the Kendall Frost Marsh. The 23,427-acre Rose Canyon Watershed that starts from runoff on the western slopes of Scripps Ranch goes through MCAS Miramar and joins with Rose and Stevenson Canyons and their tributaries. Mileage can be extended a number of ways: walk the three sections of San Clemente Canyon, adding Rose Canyon; side trips to Stanley Park; and even through a combination of trails and streets and the addition of Tecolote Canyon.

Canyoneers are San Diego Natural History Museum volunteers trained to lead interpretive nature walks that teach appreciation for the great outdoors. For a schedule of free public hikes, refer to the San Diego Natural History Museum website.

Distance from downtown San Diego: 12 miles. Allow 20 minutes driving time. From I-5 north, merge onto SR-52 east, exit on Genesee Avenue, then right again into the Marian Bear Park parking lot. Restrooms and water at trailhead.

Hiking length: 2.5 miles. Open year round for hikers and bicyclists. Dogs on a leash permitted. Best time to visit is Sunday mornings when traffic sounds are lowest. Rain can limit access.

Difficulty: Easy, with little elevation gain/loss. On the side of the trail you may occasionally see and need to avoid poison oak.

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Comments
2

There is a whole class (but definitely a tiny minority) who can't walk more than a half a block without suffering extreme pain, but can ride a mountain bike. We are classed with all other mountain bikers and kept off most nature trails by force of law (not to mention disagreeable and righteous lol's and lom's in tennis shoes and/or official outdoor togs). Yes, this is laughable, but it is also pathetic. This situation/manner of manners matter is the elephant in the room that keeps the ranks of nature lovers smaller than they could be.

Sept. 19, 2012

Marian Bear was indeed a great lady; one of those whose action and persistent courage in the face of the Goliaths of San Diego politics, industry, and commerce actually got things DONE!

Sept. 19, 2012

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4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
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