Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

How Not to Hit Each Other

“There are a couple of shoals in the bay — one at the south end of Shelter Island — that people run aground on,” says Jim Holmberg, U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Education Officer. A shoal is a sandbank that creates a shallow area. Another danger zone for watercraft in the bay is an area of mudflats just south of the Coronado Bridge.

On behalf of the Coast Guard Auxiliary, Holmberg will teach a nine-week “Boating Skills and Seamanship” course beginning Monday, July 7. Even though the “rules of the sea” are consistent throughout the country, sailors must learn the particulars of each area they encounter. For example, when entering the Oceanside Harbor, without a local chart a seafarer might infer from the buoys marking the area that the entrance splits into two channels. In fact, one of the channels is a restricted area leading to the Del Mar Basin — for authorized government vessels only. Nearly all of the information a mariner needs can be found in charts provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

One of the topics Holmberg covers in the course is collision regulation. “Collision regulation is the navigation rule that all boats are supposed to follow about how not to hit each other,” says Holmberg. “For powerboats, the boat that is off your starboard [right] side facing forward is the ‘stand-on vessel’ — that boat is to maintain course and direction. The other boat is called the ‘give-way vessel.’”

In the San Diego Bay, small boats must often navigate around much larger cargo, Navy, and cruise ships. “The boat that is least maneuverable is going to be the stand-on vessel to the boat that’s most maneuverable,” Holmberg explains. A carrier transporting cars from Japan leaves the bay every weekend. “It’s about the size of an aircraft carrier, like a big yellow building that goes through the bay.” When it exits, Holmberg says, “It will blast its horn to make sure everyone stays out of its way.”

A mistake Holmberg has seen many novice sailboaters make is to run through the channel when a Navy or other big vessel is going through. “They don’t realize that rule number nine [of the United States Coast Guard Navigation Rules] supersedes that particular rule of sailboats over powerboats.” Which means that even though a large vessel is technically a powerboat, it is actually less maneuverable than a smaller sailboat and therefore has the right to stand on — the sailboat must give way.

Because of the high volume of traffic in the bay, the Coast Guard conducts frequent boat inspections, making sure they are in compliance with safety regulations. “You need a lifejacket of proper size for everybody on board,” says Holmberg. “You can’t put a big adult one on a little five-year-old, because if the five-year-old falls in the water, that lifejacket’s just going to pop off of him. You need to have flares on the vessel, a fire extinguisher, and, especially if you go off shore at all, you need a radio and a compass.”

According to Holmberg, who owns a 35-foot Erickson sailboat, the law does not require sailors to carry a radio and compass, though he counts them among his necessities. “The radio is the only way you’re able to communicate with anybody once you go out to the ocean — cell phones don’t work that far out.” Commercial vessels are required to have VHF (very high frequency) radios, and all ships with radios monitor channel 16, the “911” of the ocean. Channel 16 is known as the hailing channel and is only to be used for distress and safety calls.

All boats have identifying lights called “running lights.” “Green and red at the bow — green’s on the starboard, red’s on the port — and a white stern light,” Holmberg explains. “So when you’re out there and all you’re able to see are little lights bobbing in the water, it gives you an indication of what kind of boat and what direction it’s traveling in. If it has a masthead light, people can know that that boat is under power, so it’s going to follow the rules of a powerboat.”

— Barbarella

Boating Skills and Seamanship Course
Monday July 7 (nine-week course, Monday evenings)
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
San Diego County Health Building
3851 Rosecrans Street
Point Loma
Cost: $25 fee for text, class free
Info: 619-299-6546 or www.nws.cgaux.org/visitors

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

San Diego Lotharios rejoice at news of mandatory 10 pm nightlife shutdown

Closed Doors = Closed Deals

“There are a couple of shoals in the bay — one at the south end of Shelter Island — that people run aground on,” says Jim Holmberg, U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Education Officer. A shoal is a sandbank that creates a shallow area. Another danger zone for watercraft in the bay is an area of mudflats just south of the Coronado Bridge.

On behalf of the Coast Guard Auxiliary, Holmberg will teach a nine-week “Boating Skills and Seamanship” course beginning Monday, July 7. Even though the “rules of the sea” are consistent throughout the country, sailors must learn the particulars of each area they encounter. For example, when entering the Oceanside Harbor, without a local chart a seafarer might infer from the buoys marking the area that the entrance splits into two channels. In fact, one of the channels is a restricted area leading to the Del Mar Basin — for authorized government vessels only. Nearly all of the information a mariner needs can be found in charts provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

One of the topics Holmberg covers in the course is collision regulation. “Collision regulation is the navigation rule that all boats are supposed to follow about how not to hit each other,” says Holmberg. “For powerboats, the boat that is off your starboard [right] side facing forward is the ‘stand-on vessel’ — that boat is to maintain course and direction. The other boat is called the ‘give-way vessel.’”

In the San Diego Bay, small boats must often navigate around much larger cargo, Navy, and cruise ships. “The boat that is least maneuverable is going to be the stand-on vessel to the boat that’s most maneuverable,” Holmberg explains. A carrier transporting cars from Japan leaves the bay every weekend. “It’s about the size of an aircraft carrier, like a big yellow building that goes through the bay.” When it exits, Holmberg says, “It will blast its horn to make sure everyone stays out of its way.”

A mistake Holmberg has seen many novice sailboaters make is to run through the channel when a Navy or other big vessel is going through. “They don’t realize that rule number nine [of the United States Coast Guard Navigation Rules] supersedes that particular rule of sailboats over powerboats.” Which means that even though a large vessel is technically a powerboat, it is actually less maneuverable than a smaller sailboat and therefore has the right to stand on — the sailboat must give way.

Because of the high volume of traffic in the bay, the Coast Guard conducts frequent boat inspections, making sure they are in compliance with safety regulations. “You need a lifejacket of proper size for everybody on board,” says Holmberg. “You can’t put a big adult one on a little five-year-old, because if the five-year-old falls in the water, that lifejacket’s just going to pop off of him. You need to have flares on the vessel, a fire extinguisher, and, especially if you go off shore at all, you need a radio and a compass.”

According to Holmberg, who owns a 35-foot Erickson sailboat, the law does not require sailors to carry a radio and compass, though he counts them among his necessities. “The radio is the only way you’re able to communicate with anybody once you go out to the ocean — cell phones don’t work that far out.” Commercial vessels are required to have VHF (very high frequency) radios, and all ships with radios monitor channel 16, the “911” of the ocean. Channel 16 is known as the hailing channel and is only to be used for distress and safety calls.

All boats have identifying lights called “running lights.” “Green and red at the bow — green’s on the starboard, red’s on the port — and a white stern light,” Holmberg explains. “So when you’re out there and all you’re able to see are little lights bobbing in the water, it gives you an indication of what kind of boat and what direction it’s traveling in. If it has a masthead light, people can know that that boat is under power, so it’s going to follow the rules of a powerboat.”

— Barbarella

Boating Skills and Seamanship Course
Monday July 7 (nine-week course, Monday evenings)
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
San Diego County Health Building
3851 Rosecrans Street
Point Loma
Cost: $25 fee for text, class free
Info: 619-299-6546 or www.nws.cgaux.org/visitors

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

San Diego Lotharios rejoice at news of mandatory 10 pm nightlife shutdown

Closed Doors = Closed Deals
Next Article

Mexico after the millenium

Smuggling, TJ nightlife, deported, TJ as hip destination, can't stop thinking about TJ, cross-border kidnapping
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close