Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Youth Movement

The kids are all right — especially the kids in Ocean Beach. Ed Moore certainly thinks so. His revamped 3rd Corner Wine Shop & Bistro "wouldn't have succeeded the way it has if it hadn't been for the kids." At Thee Bungalow, the restaurant across the street that Moore recently sold, "I saw some OB people. But I think that OB in general was afraid of that restaurant. That's where you took your parents when they came to town."

But open a bistro serving smaller meals that top out at $14 and the option to buy a bottle of wine and drink it onsite for just $5 over retail, and things change. That's at least partly because the kids themselves have changed. "I still distinctly remember a conversation I had in our first week. This kid — he couldn't have been much older than 22, 23, blond, surfer — started asking me about a couple of wines. I started talking to him, and I said, 'What do you do?' 'Professional surfer.' And the more we talked, the more I realized he really knew something about wine. I asked, 'Where did you learn all this?' 'Well, you know, I travel all over the world. South Africa, Australia, all these places, and they all have wine. Somebody turned me on to it when I was 18. I like beer, but I'm a surfer, and I've got to stay in pretty good shape.' We started talking about Pinotage and Shiraz and Semillion, and I thought, 'This isn't what I would have considered a typical surfer.'"

The grown-ups still come in, of course, and Moore is happy to see them. Early- to mid-evening traffic tends to be older, and on Friday afternoons, the sitting room is a haven for teachers recovering from the week's travails. But it's the late-night push that has taken 3rd Corner over the top. Right away, says Moore, "We started catching some restaurant traffic." Restaurant staffers who sold wine to diners "started bringing their buddies in after work. Three of them could grab a $12 bottle of wine, sit down, and finish it off. I can tell you on a nightly basis how business was around town by how much they're willing to spend here. If they have no money, they're ordering the $6 bottle of whatever. If tips were good that night, they would split a $40-$50 bottle. They were finding $50 wines here that were on their own lists for $120."

Moore and company were quick to accommodate. "When we first opened up, we were open until 11 o'clock Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Sunday. On Friday and Saturday, we were trying to do midnight, 1 o'clock. Within the first two weeks, my general manager Alex and I looked at each other and said, 'We should be open until two.' After 11, except for Friday and Saturday, we have no corkage. That's how we appeal to that group."

Moore's liquor license carries a 50/50 condition, which means he has to sell "a dollar's worth of food for a dollar's worth of booze" consumed onsite. He has a full bar, and he carries a few wines by the glass, but, he says, "We don't want the image of a wine bar. I'm suspicious of giant by-the-glass lists. 'How old is that bottle?'"The 3rd Corner is a restaurant, one that caters to all comers but seems especially amenable to the sort of diner who picks a bottle of wine and then thinks about what dish he'd like to go with it. Talking about his late-night restaurant crowd, Moore says, "After they relax with a glass of wine or so, they invariably order something to eat."

The possibility of duck confit after midnight makes the place something of a rarity in San Diego. In many parts of town, late-night dining means fast food or an all-night diner. (Not to say that either of these is an unpleasant option, just that they're all that's out there, and if you're in the mood for Pinot, you may want something a little more gussied-up.) Says Moore, "I'm flabbergasted that in the Gaslamp, it turns over 100 percent to the nightclub scene, that there isn't something beyond the basic taco shop that stays open late. There have got to be night owls there who don't want to go to the clubs. Once they find we're here, they love it."

And in the course of serving youth, Moore has found success with youthful servers — or at least, the less experienced. "Our initial hires weren't really wine savvy. We found that the wine savvier they were, the less friendly they were. The people we hired were people who made us feel comfortable in the interview. We figured, 'If they make us feel comfortable, they're bound to make the customer feel comfortable. We can teach them the wine.' They all drank wine — every one of them will buy at least a couple of bottles a week and take them home. And we give the wine to them at our cost. We just kept hiring them on that principle and training them and training them."

Even the management is relatively fresh-faced. "They're young and energetic. The ones who started with us and want to grow with us will get a chance to do that. My whole idea is that it doesn't need me — it's the idea that works or doesn't work. I have managed to phase myself out here. I'm not as young as I once was. I can spend a little time at home, spend some time doing things I may have missed over the last 20, 30 years."

Moore doesn't even do the buying; he leaves that to GM Alex Lindsay and wine manager Chris Delaney. Alex was a waiter at Thee Bungalow; Chris is late of the Wine Lover, where he worked as an assistant manager. "They kind of work in tandem, so we always have two palates. Chris tends to be a little more wine-geekish. Alex, I've taught my way of tasting. I don't care about flavors of scorched earth or wet stones. 'What does it taste like, and is it worth the price point?' That's all you've got to ask yourself." Well, almost all. "Obviously, there's a little bit more to it than that: 'Does it have a long finish?' That's usually an indicator that a wine has got something good in it. Do I care about the nose? Yes and no. I don't want it to smell like crap. But by the same token, if it's got no nose, I don't really care. We're not going to smell this wine all night long; we're going to drink it. Alex understands how I taste and what I'm looking for. Between them, it makes a great tag team — otherwise, we might have wines that are a little too esoteric, a little too much in the Sylvaner realm."

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

San Diego Lotharios rejoice at news of mandatory 10 pm nightlife shutdown

Closed Doors = Closed Deals
Next Article

Jorge Hank's wealthy nephew heads for White House dinner

Tijuana billionaire's relative an AMLO invite

The kids are all right — especially the kids in Ocean Beach. Ed Moore certainly thinks so. His revamped 3rd Corner Wine Shop & Bistro "wouldn't have succeeded the way it has if it hadn't been for the kids." At Thee Bungalow, the restaurant across the street that Moore recently sold, "I saw some OB people. But I think that OB in general was afraid of that restaurant. That's where you took your parents when they came to town."

But open a bistro serving smaller meals that top out at $14 and the option to buy a bottle of wine and drink it onsite for just $5 over retail, and things change. That's at least partly because the kids themselves have changed. "I still distinctly remember a conversation I had in our first week. This kid — he couldn't have been much older than 22, 23, blond, surfer — started asking me about a couple of wines. I started talking to him, and I said, 'What do you do?' 'Professional surfer.' And the more we talked, the more I realized he really knew something about wine. I asked, 'Where did you learn all this?' 'Well, you know, I travel all over the world. South Africa, Australia, all these places, and they all have wine. Somebody turned me on to it when I was 18. I like beer, but I'm a surfer, and I've got to stay in pretty good shape.' We started talking about Pinotage and Shiraz and Semillion, and I thought, 'This isn't what I would have considered a typical surfer.'"

The grown-ups still come in, of course, and Moore is happy to see them. Early- to mid-evening traffic tends to be older, and on Friday afternoons, the sitting room is a haven for teachers recovering from the week's travails. But it's the late-night push that has taken 3rd Corner over the top. Right away, says Moore, "We started catching some restaurant traffic." Restaurant staffers who sold wine to diners "started bringing their buddies in after work. Three of them could grab a $12 bottle of wine, sit down, and finish it off. I can tell you on a nightly basis how business was around town by how much they're willing to spend here. If they have no money, they're ordering the $6 bottle of whatever. If tips were good that night, they would split a $40-$50 bottle. They were finding $50 wines here that were on their own lists for $120."

Moore and company were quick to accommodate. "When we first opened up, we were open until 11 o'clock Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Sunday. On Friday and Saturday, we were trying to do midnight, 1 o'clock. Within the first two weeks, my general manager Alex and I looked at each other and said, 'We should be open until two.' After 11, except for Friday and Saturday, we have no corkage. That's how we appeal to that group."

Moore's liquor license carries a 50/50 condition, which means he has to sell "a dollar's worth of food for a dollar's worth of booze" consumed onsite. He has a full bar, and he carries a few wines by the glass, but, he says, "We don't want the image of a wine bar. I'm suspicious of giant by-the-glass lists. 'How old is that bottle?'"The 3rd Corner is a restaurant, one that caters to all comers but seems especially amenable to the sort of diner who picks a bottle of wine and then thinks about what dish he'd like to go with it. Talking about his late-night restaurant crowd, Moore says, "After they relax with a glass of wine or so, they invariably order something to eat."

The possibility of duck confit after midnight makes the place something of a rarity in San Diego. In many parts of town, late-night dining means fast food or an all-night diner. (Not to say that either of these is an unpleasant option, just that they're all that's out there, and if you're in the mood for Pinot, you may want something a little more gussied-up.) Says Moore, "I'm flabbergasted that in the Gaslamp, it turns over 100 percent to the nightclub scene, that there isn't something beyond the basic taco shop that stays open late. There have got to be night owls there who don't want to go to the clubs. Once they find we're here, they love it."

And in the course of serving youth, Moore has found success with youthful servers — or at least, the less experienced. "Our initial hires weren't really wine savvy. We found that the wine savvier they were, the less friendly they were. The people we hired were people who made us feel comfortable in the interview. We figured, 'If they make us feel comfortable, they're bound to make the customer feel comfortable. We can teach them the wine.' They all drank wine — every one of them will buy at least a couple of bottles a week and take them home. And we give the wine to them at our cost. We just kept hiring them on that principle and training them and training them."

Even the management is relatively fresh-faced. "They're young and energetic. The ones who started with us and want to grow with us will get a chance to do that. My whole idea is that it doesn't need me — it's the idea that works or doesn't work. I have managed to phase myself out here. I'm not as young as I once was. I can spend a little time at home, spend some time doing things I may have missed over the last 20, 30 years."

Moore doesn't even do the buying; he leaves that to GM Alex Lindsay and wine manager Chris Delaney. Alex was a waiter at Thee Bungalow; Chris is late of the Wine Lover, where he worked as an assistant manager. "They kind of work in tandem, so we always have two palates. Chris tends to be a little more wine-geekish. Alex, I've taught my way of tasting. I don't care about flavors of scorched earth or wet stones. 'What does it taste like, and is it worth the price point?' That's all you've got to ask yourself." Well, almost all. "Obviously, there's a little bit more to it than that: 'Does it have a long finish?' That's usually an indicator that a wine has got something good in it. Do I care about the nose? Yes and no. I don't want it to smell like crap. But by the same token, if it's got no nose, I don't really care. We're not going to smell this wine all night long; we're going to drink it. Alex understands how I taste and what I'm looking for. Between them, it makes a great tag team — otherwise, we might have wines that are a little too esoteric, a little too much in the Sylvaner realm."

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Moved to tears by Dave’s Hot Chicken

Nashville hot chicken ranges from no spice, to hot, to the indemnified “reaper”
Next Article

John Harris: editor of one of the first English dictionaries

Known as a man of science as a man of faith
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close