4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Jellybeans and Brine

There are a few very old memories in my head that have endured for many years. Three of them are closely related and I think of them often, although they honestly don’t seem to hold much genuine significance for me, or anyone else for that matter. If I remember correctly, and I’m sure I do, I hadn’t yet entered kindergarten, so I must have been only four or maybe five years old when the three memories were created.

These memories involve my mother, her father, and me. I’ve asked my mother if she could help me to clarify these three memories but she told me she has absolutely no recollection of them at all. One of the memories consists of the three of us entering a seaside restaurant on a clear night. I’m not sure where the restaurant was, but I think it was near my grandfather’s home in Ocean Beach, perhaps in Point Loma or on Shelter Island. We walked across a wooden walk that led to the restaurant’s entrance. I held my mother’s hand as she and her father chatted pleasantly. The night was quiet, and I heard our footsteps sounding solidly on the wooden planks of the walk as the salty smelling ocean lapped gently at the shore nearby.

The restaurant was dark and there didn’t seem to be many people inside. A friendly hostess greeted us in the lobby and then led us to our table. There was a lighted candle on each table, every one of them glowing in a red glass container with white netting around it. I didn’t know why, but the little white nets clasping the pretty glass candle containers made me feel good and safe. My mother and grandfather for the most part ignored me, but I didn’t mind. I liked being in the ocean restaurant, and the small, sliced baguette with butter the waitress brought to us tasted wonderful. I don’t remember what we ordered because this is where the memory ends. Maybe I got a cheeseburger for dinner. I’ve loved them for as long as I can remember. My mother and grandfather probably ordered seafood.

Another memory is of my mother and me riding in my grandfather’s silver station wagon. My grandfather drove, my mother sat shotgun, and I was in the backseat. It was night. It may have even been the same night that we went to the seaside restaurant. My mother and her father talked about things that meant little to me. I looked out the window at people walking on the sidewalks beneath streetlights and driving their cars in the darkness. I thought about toys, comic books, cartoons, and which breakfast cereals I liked the best. Then my mother said something that caught my attention. “I can smell your bump, Dad,” she said.

My grandfather chuckled and held up his right elbow for her to see. “Yes,” he said, holding his arm at shoulder height in the car’s dark interior, “I really banged it a good one yesterday at work.” There was a medium sized bandage near my grandfather’s elbow.

“Does it still hurt?” my mother wanted to know.

“A little. But don’t worry about it, Kathy,” he said good-naturedly. “In a day or two it’ll be as good as new.”

I looked over the top of the front seat to get a better look at his injury. I inhaled deeply through my nose. I wanted to smell my grandfather’s bump too, a phenomenon that, until that very moment, I was unaware even existed. I smelled something unusual and mediciney. This, I assumed, was the bump. I had also suffered through bumps, and I wondered why mine never smelled like my grandfather’s. Maybe bumps didn’t smell funny until after you became an adult.

Years later I would attach the smell to mentholated topical ointments used for muscle relief.

The last of the memories is the one of us walking through a restaurant lobby. It was not the seaside restaurant. This restaurant was brightly lit, crowded, and our visit occurred during the daytime. I don’t know if we were arriving or leaving. There was a large Brach’s candy sign over the cashier’s counter. The white, purple, and magenta sign with the small golden star over the “h” awakened delightful, good tasting thoughts in me. I hoped my mother and grandfather would buy me some candy before we left. I wanted chocolate covered raisins, but I would have settled for butterscotch disks or jellybeans. And I knew that the moment my tongue made eager contact with the sweet candy, I would instantly think of burning candles in red glass vessels cradled inside of clinging white nets. The nets embrace the flames and red glass tightly and perhaps forever, reminding me of flickering memories and distant dreams twinkling in the night sky.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

La Jolla’s Monkey House

“The site of many family weddings, 4th of July parades, holiday parties, and La Jolla Secret Garden Tours.”
Next Article

Padres player scandals, city council caves to John Moores, farm manager Russ Nixon tells history

1995 season-long strike, handicapped fans tell how it is for them, who really owns the team?

There are a few very old memories in my head that have endured for many years. Three of them are closely related and I think of them often, although they honestly don’t seem to hold much genuine significance for me, or anyone else for that matter. If I remember correctly, and I’m sure I do, I hadn’t yet entered kindergarten, so I must have been only four or maybe five years old when the three memories were created.

These memories involve my mother, her father, and me. I’ve asked my mother if she could help me to clarify these three memories but she told me she has absolutely no recollection of them at all. One of the memories consists of the three of us entering a seaside restaurant on a clear night. I’m not sure where the restaurant was, but I think it was near my grandfather’s home in Ocean Beach, perhaps in Point Loma or on Shelter Island. We walked across a wooden walk that led to the restaurant’s entrance. I held my mother’s hand as she and her father chatted pleasantly. The night was quiet, and I heard our footsteps sounding solidly on the wooden planks of the walk as the salty smelling ocean lapped gently at the shore nearby.

The restaurant was dark and there didn’t seem to be many people inside. A friendly hostess greeted us in the lobby and then led us to our table. There was a lighted candle on each table, every one of them glowing in a red glass container with white netting around it. I didn’t know why, but the little white nets clasping the pretty glass candle containers made me feel good and safe. My mother and grandfather for the most part ignored me, but I didn’t mind. I liked being in the ocean restaurant, and the small, sliced baguette with butter the waitress brought to us tasted wonderful. I don’t remember what we ordered because this is where the memory ends. Maybe I got a cheeseburger for dinner. I’ve loved them for as long as I can remember. My mother and grandfather probably ordered seafood.

Another memory is of my mother and me riding in my grandfather’s silver station wagon. My grandfather drove, my mother sat shotgun, and I was in the backseat. It was night. It may have even been the same night that we went to the seaside restaurant. My mother and her father talked about things that meant little to me. I looked out the window at people walking on the sidewalks beneath streetlights and driving their cars in the darkness. I thought about toys, comic books, cartoons, and which breakfast cereals I liked the best. Then my mother said something that caught my attention. “I can smell your bump, Dad,” she said.

My grandfather chuckled and held up his right elbow for her to see. “Yes,” he said, holding his arm at shoulder height in the car’s dark interior, “I really banged it a good one yesterday at work.” There was a medium sized bandage near my grandfather’s elbow.

“Does it still hurt?” my mother wanted to know.

“A little. But don’t worry about it, Kathy,” he said good-naturedly. “In a day or two it’ll be as good as new.”

I looked over the top of the front seat to get a better look at his injury. I inhaled deeply through my nose. I wanted to smell my grandfather’s bump too, a phenomenon that, until that very moment, I was unaware even existed. I smelled something unusual and mediciney. This, I assumed, was the bump. I had also suffered through bumps, and I wondered why mine never smelled like my grandfather’s. Maybe bumps didn’t smell funny until after you became an adult.

Years later I would attach the smell to mentholated topical ointments used for muscle relief.

The last of the memories is the one of us walking through a restaurant lobby. It was not the seaside restaurant. This restaurant was brightly lit, crowded, and our visit occurred during the daytime. I don’t know if we were arriving or leaving. There was a large Brach’s candy sign over the cashier’s counter. The white, purple, and magenta sign with the small golden star over the “h” awakened delightful, good tasting thoughts in me. I hoped my mother and grandfather would buy me some candy before we left. I wanted chocolate covered raisins, but I would have settled for butterscotch disks or jellybeans. And I knew that the moment my tongue made eager contact with the sweet candy, I would instantly think of burning candles in red glass vessels cradled inside of clinging white nets. The nets embrace the flames and red glass tightly and perhaps forever, reminding me of flickering memories and distant dreams twinkling in the night sky.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Comments
11

isn't it interesting how some memories cling

even when as adults they seem to have no rhyme or reason...

lovely blog Quill

it mades me think of Baby Ruth's that i would buy at the corner store in La Mesa...Mac's Market...with 2 cents that i had acquired going thru the neighborhood asking for empty Coke bottles

Jan. 25, 2011

Candy, nan, the universal memory inhancer: Boston Baked Beans, candy root beer barrrels, Charms Pops, Sugar Daddys, Sugar Mamas, and Sugur Babies, Wacky Wafers, Big Hunks, Abazabas, Chick-O-Sticks, wax lips, teeth, and mustaches, and those wonderful little wax Coke bottles filled with sweet colored fluid, and as Halloween approached delightful little skulls and skeletons. I'm not much of a candy eater anymore, but I still cannot resist a Milky Way bar now and then.

Jan. 25, 2011

Boston Baked Beans- I loved those as a kid......hope they still make them!

Jan. 25, 2011

I hope they still make 'em too because I ate a handful of them this morning and if they stopped making them . . . . . . . . . .

Jan. 25, 2011

LOL!

Jan. 26, 2011

In front of "Your Mama's Mug" on Newport Avenue is a bank of gumball, etc. dispensers, and one of them has Boston Baked Beans - this is where I go for my fix!! I love 'em, too.

Jan. 26, 2011

Don't forget the candy cigarettes, Quilly!! Totally uncool now, but absolutely a must-have for us kids pretending to smoke then nibbling the "lit" end off first. This was a terrific blog. I am trying to figure out what that restaurant was...maybe Red Sails???

Jan. 26, 2011

D'oh!

Jan. 26, 2011

The store you need is at http://www.hometownfavorites.com. They even have Fizzies. God knows where they've been storing this stuff.

There's also a "nostalgic" candy store somewhere in Seasick Village. Worth a visit.

Jan. 26, 2011

I remember those, MsGrant; There were two kinds: the chalky candy cigarettes that were all welded together and you had to break each cigarette off one at a time, and then there were the bubblegum ones that you could blow out a mist of powdered sugar, and don't forget the green or pink chewing gum cigars.

Jan. 26, 2011

I loved the cigars! They tasted kind of like banana Big Buddies.

Jan. 26, 2011

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Drinks All Around — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close