4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Admitted thief asked court's permission to travel to Mexico

Maria Carmen Nater ordered to repay thousands to libraries

A Vista woman accused of stealing thousands of books from San Diego County libraries in 2011, was in court yesterday asking permission to travel to Mexico.

Maria Carmen Nater, 46, was granted her probation modification appeal yesterday, February 28, 2013, by Superior Court Judge Timothy Casserly.

The petite Latina is on three years probation, after she pleaded guilty to one felony count of “commercial burglary” a year ago, in February 2012. She hopes to have her felony conviction reduced to a misdemeanor after 18 months successful probation, according to her private defense attorney Michael Hernandez.

Maria Carmen Nater has remained free on bond, since 2011, during the progress of her case.

Carlsbad police began an investigation after library workers noticed Maria Carmen Nater and two of her children, aged 7 and 8, trying to leave with a rolling cart full of books that had not-yet-been-checked out. Library staff were already concerned because they had realized unusual high loss recently, of certain high-value books, such as cooking and craft and oversized books, according to police statements found in court files.

Police obtained a search warrant, and went to Maria Carmen Nater’s home on Lado De Loma Drive in Vista, on September 6, 2011. Their report stated that approximately 1000 books “could be observed in plain view” and Nater “admitted to selling books on Amazon and stated she had multiple library books in her residence.”

“Maria Carmen Nater was unable to explain how she obtained such a large quantity of library books,” according to Carlsbad police. “Approximately 2,000 books” and “numerous DVDs” were seized, according to search warrant paperwork.

In her plea deal, Maria Carmen Nater agreed to refrain from having an online account with eBay or Amazon or Craigslist, and to not purchase nor sell merchandise online during her probation period. She was ordered to pay $7,600 in restitution, divided among Escondido and Oceanside and Carlsbad and San Diego County Public libraries.

Some of the conditions of Nater’s probation were listed as: “Stay away from, do not enter any library. Do not maintain or use any online accounts. Do not sell/purchase merchandise online.”

(Through her attorney, Maria Carmen Nater later got a superior court judge to order police return 17 different items that were taken from her home during the investigation, including gold and silver coins and luxury watches, a black fur coat, and a Louis Vuitton handbag. Also listed was the blue-and-black cart which the admitted felon used to haul away stolen library books and was first noticed by Carlsbad library employees, who then contacted police.)

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Mt. Soledad, Mt. Woodson, Cowles Mountain for spectacular sunsets

Tly Anza Borrego canyons for palm fruit

A Vista woman accused of stealing thousands of books from San Diego County libraries in 2011, was in court yesterday asking permission to travel to Mexico.

Maria Carmen Nater, 46, was granted her probation modification appeal yesterday, February 28, 2013, by Superior Court Judge Timothy Casserly.

The petite Latina is on three years probation, after she pleaded guilty to one felony count of “commercial burglary” a year ago, in February 2012. She hopes to have her felony conviction reduced to a misdemeanor after 18 months successful probation, according to her private defense attorney Michael Hernandez.

Maria Carmen Nater has remained free on bond, since 2011, during the progress of her case.

Carlsbad police began an investigation after library workers noticed Maria Carmen Nater and two of her children, aged 7 and 8, trying to leave with a rolling cart full of books that had not-yet-been-checked out. Library staff were already concerned because they had realized unusual high loss recently, of certain high-value books, such as cooking and craft and oversized books, according to police statements found in court files.

Police obtained a search warrant, and went to Maria Carmen Nater’s home on Lado De Loma Drive in Vista, on September 6, 2011. Their report stated that approximately 1000 books “could be observed in plain view” and Nater “admitted to selling books on Amazon and stated she had multiple library books in her residence.”

“Maria Carmen Nater was unable to explain how she obtained such a large quantity of library books,” according to Carlsbad police. “Approximately 2,000 books” and “numerous DVDs” were seized, according to search warrant paperwork.

In her plea deal, Maria Carmen Nater agreed to refrain from having an online account with eBay or Amazon or Craigslist, and to not purchase nor sell merchandise online during her probation period. She was ordered to pay $7,600 in restitution, divided among Escondido and Oceanside and Carlsbad and San Diego County Public libraries.

Some of the conditions of Nater’s probation were listed as: “Stay away from, do not enter any library. Do not maintain or use any online accounts. Do not sell/purchase merchandise online.”

(Through her attorney, Maria Carmen Nater later got a superior court judge to order police return 17 different items that were taken from her home during the investigation, including gold and silver coins and luxury watches, a black fur coat, and a Louis Vuitton handbag. Also listed was the blue-and-black cart which the admitted felon used to haul away stolen library books and was first noticed by Carlsbad library employees, who then contacted police.)

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Comments
3

I still cannot figure out how she was able to remove all traces of what the library puts on books to ID them as library books so that she was then able to sell them on eBay. I doubt people ordered books from Amazon or eBay and when they arrived, the people noticed the books had formerly been owned by the public library and just ignored that. I would think someone would have contacted Amazon or eBay and asked what was up. Seems odd to me.

March 1, 2013

javajoe25, it happens all the time. It just depends on how she listed them as to whether or not buyers noticed or cared. Public libraries discard used books quite frequently. Many of them have their own used bookstores and sell them themselves. Many of them also have periodic sales. During the sales apparently many of the books are scooped up by dealers who then sell them online. If you do a search of online book sales, you'd find that books from libraries all across the country are available and are perfectly legit because they are library discards. It's easy to work the system when you know how the system works.

March 1, 2013

You are absolutely correct. I'd like to see some way to prevent thieves from stealing the books and reselling them, but at this time there's no foolproof way to do that. She drove a truck through a one-inch gap.

March 1, 2013

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Drinks All Around — Bartenders' drink recipes Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories Fishing Report — What’s getting hooked from ship and shore From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Outdoors — Weekly changes in flora and fauna Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Street Style — San Diego streets have style Surf Diego — Real stories from those braving the waves Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close