Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Mexican drug cartels are turning to San Diego’s youth to function as drug mules, the Latin American Herald Tribune is reporting.

Eleven percent of the more than 5000 youths that have been incarcerated in San Diego (many of them Hispanics accused of being involved in street gangs) report being approached at some time or another to transport drugs across the border. The youths, who can more easily cross into Mexico and back without raising suspicion, begin transporting contraband at an average age of 14.

Pedro Rios, an activist who works with the San Diego office of the American Friends Service Committee, says South Bay high schools have become particularly fertile recruiting grounds for cartels.

“The traffickers pay them around $400 per trip carrying drugs, but we have also seen them get involved in human trafficking, generally picking the people up on this side of the border and taking them to safe houses,” Rios told the Herald Tribune.

Rios is pushing for an expansion of the Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act, a county law that was adopted in 2000 in response to rising crime rates among youth in the 1990s. He argues that prevention programs should especially be beefed up in the county’s southern regions, where teens are more likely to be targeted to transport drugs and potentially become addicts themselves.

Comments
5

When there are no jobs what choice does one have when it comes to living or dying?

Dec. 28, 2011

SurfPup, it is an irony. Teenagers used to mow lawns, deliver newspapers, work in fast food, busboy, and other jobs. Now they can’t find work in those vocations because mostly Mexican adults have taken the jobs over.

In addition, our society then complains that “kids these days” just stay home and watch video games and get fat eating junk food. Well if there were some after school jobs for them, many would prefer to work.

Dec. 28, 2011

Adults will always say kids today are weaker, dumber, lazier, so forth, than when they were kids-it is not true.

Kids are kids, sure-some are lazy, but most want to make a life for themselves and it is hard when you can't find a job b/c there are none, or the few who are employed are making $7 an hour and cannot make ends meet, no one can make ends meet on minimume wage jobs .....which account for 41% of all American jobs today.

GM was the largest private sector employer in America 30 years ago-today it is Walmart.

Dec. 28, 2011

what you report in this story is true.

young men and women, part of a poor family unit, looking for a way to help feed their younger brothers and sisters - take the load off of a struggling mother - lured into the drug traffic world, or the world of driving stolen cars across the border. they enter the world full of naivety "just one time, i will do it just one time". then are faced with the hard core reality - no one simply pops into the cartel world for a short time - once you are in you are in.

students hiding during lunch and breaks - looking over their shoulder for 'them' - those sent to retaliate and send the message 'you belong to us now, we own you - think you can hide? we will get you, if not you, no prob we will get your brother, sister, or mother -'

such a depressing reality.

Dec. 28, 2011

"Rios is pushing for an expansion of the Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act, a county law that was adopted in 2000 in response to rising crime rates among youth in the 1990s. He argues that prevention programs should especially be beefed up in the county’s southern regions, where teens are more likely to be targeted to transport drugs and potentially become addicts themselves."

I have a much better program to use, instead of the billion dollar Rios Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act that won't work, why not try one that is free-it is really only 4 letters;

JOBS

Dec. 28, 2011

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close