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The real estate industry keeps lining Mayor Jerry Sanders's pocket -- a perfect arrangement, since he is in their pockets. The government affairs committee of Commercial REALTORS Association of San Diego and the CCIM San Diego Chapter have joined with Susan Lew of Emerald Restaurant to host a fundraising reception. (CCIM stands for Certified Commercial Investment Member, or an expert in commercial and investment real estate.) "The re-elect Mayor Sanders campaign still needs our support as he needs $15,000 still," says the invitation signed by hosts Susan Lew, Graham Bryan, Jim Taylor and Jay Diskin. It's $250 per person, $320 maximum June 16 at the Emerald Restaurant. Personal checks only.

Comments
14

Response to post #13: All your points are excellent -- and frightening. Best, Don Bauder

June 13, 2008

Jay Disken used to run IPC Commercial Real Estate.

IPC was a third tier toilet commercial real estate firm and a number of their brokers bailed to form another firm (Similar to what happened to Daum, when Business Real Estate Brokerage broke off-Daum-San Diego folded and BRE morphed into a Grubb and Ellis affiliate).

I know the number of CCIM brokers is very very small in San Diego, probably less than 25 total. Not much money from CCIM.

June 11, 2008

Response to post #1: They may not be that important in the real estate industry, but if they write enough checks of $250 to $320, Sanders will give them praise -- as well as what they want from his administration. Best, Don Bauder

June 12, 2008

Don,

A silly question, that I think I already know the answer to:

Sanders retired very young (49 according to his bio on wikipedia) with what I assume was a very hefty pension based on 26 years worked plus purchased years against a chiefs salary. My recollection is that he is not drawing much of a salary (I've read it's about $36,000) as mayor because he made a campaign promise not to reenter the pension system. Of course if he reentered the pension system, he would stop receiving his $84,000 pension, so it seems like he comes out no worse and possibly better by keeping his "promise".

My question is that seeing as how there is absolutely no way that Sanders is working for 7 years as mayor at $36K per year, exactly who is paying him, how, and how much?

June 12, 2008

Response to post #3: Yours is not a silly question. I do not know the answer to it. Best, Don Bauder

June 12, 2008

Sanders nominal salary is not the prize. Its the power and ability to direct city dollars, pave the way for developers, etc. In exchange you can be sure that he has many favors built up for future jobs for himself, family and friends. Plus do you think the job is that difficult? Lots of paid for lunches, dinners, car allowance, functions like U.S. Open, Padre games, Charger games, fundraisers, etc.

June 12, 2008

Susan Lew is on the board of the same bank (1st Pacific) that Ronne Froman was (Froman resigned from the board when she became city COO). They happen to make a lot of loans to developers and builders and their "Advisory Board" has many developers and builders.

June 12, 2008

I was told at one time that Sanders had a disability retirement and that is was stress related. Is this true? And if so, how can he be in such a stressful position? Don't stress related retirements ever get reviewed? Is there a limit to how much salary one can take from the City if one returns to work for the City. Orrrrrrr does being an elected official change all that. Just wondering.

June 12, 2008

Sanders was not elected by the people: Look at the election facts: http://citizensboe.blogspot.com/2007/05/back-to-vu-san-diego-cas-whole.html We hired 2 criminals to run the registrar. Deborah Seiler was a sales rep for Diebold and sold us the voting machines. Micheal Vu is also from the Ohio crew that fixed the 04 pres. election:

In January, a court convicted two elections workers in that county of illegally rigging the 2004 presidential election recount so they could avoid a more complete review of votes. Vu defended the workers, saying they had followed long-standing procedures and done nothing wrong.

We got rid of the DB voting machines but now have Diebold optical scanners and central vote tabulation: a recipe for fraud.

The results do not match the polls especially in the city atty race where Goldsmith polled 3 times at about 15% and then scored 32% a few days later in the election.

June 12, 2008

Response to post #5: I don't disagree with you. Most ex-elected officials go on to fat jobs as lobbyists or corporate executives. However, look at what has happened in San Diego. Golding left in disgrace. She set up a consulting operation and got some board positions, but I don't think she is cashing in nearly as much as she expected to. Murphy resigned in double disgrace and I don't think he is doing anything remunerative. Unless Sanders gets in deep trouble -- and he very well might -- he will probably get something with real estate developers. Best, Don Bauder

June 12, 2008

Response to post #6: Thanks for the added information. Real estate is coming to Sanders's help. After all, the industry owns him. Froman might have served on that bank board but she also got out of the Sanders administration in a hurry. Best, Don Bauder

June 12, 2008

Response to post #7: It is said that Sanders retired from the police for some kind of stress-related reason but I do not know that for certain. I do not believe that has been made public, but I may be wrong on that. I don't know the answers to your other questions. Best, Don Bauder

June 12, 2008

Response to post #8: You raise very interesting points. A full investigation of those two hires from Ohio has never been made. There have been discrepancies between the polling results and the pre-election polls. Whether that reflects some manipulation or inaccurate pre-election polling is a very good question. Best, Don Bauder

June 12, 2008

In 1996-97 I wrote a paper for the San Diego Crime Commission on voter fraud. A summary was published in their newsletter.

The conclusion was that, in the words of then California Secretary of State Bill Jones, the system was "Ripe for fraud."

Little has changed since then, except in a negative direction.

The software running these systems remains secret. Is it infected with trojans or back-doors? Can the database tables be manipulated? Can they simply swap results between candidates, giving A the votes of B?

We just don't know. But we do know that some of these systems are easily hacked, prone to errors and malfunctions, and immune to challenge even when there are glaring flaws.

Can the unscrupulous register multiple plausible aliases, vote absentee, and pass completely undetected? Absolutely. I documented exactly how to do so. Nothing has changed since then. I can still register a whole family of hamsters to vote, fill in their absentee ballots, and have them counted in an eletion with nobody the wiser.

The "Motor Voter" law was well-intentioned, but fatally-flawed. As we saw in Florida and Ohio, optical scanners are not particularly trustworthy. We also saw that politically motivated officials have the power to end-run recounts.

The owners of vote tabulation companies make substantial campaign contributions. Instead of neutral honest brokers, they are partisans in the business of pleasing politicians.

Our voting process should be open and transparent. Instead it is tightly controlled by a few, and not open to outside observation or validation.

Various reform proposals have surfaced, including making the software running the tabulation machines open source. This makes a lot of sense for both technical and public policy reasons, but has gotten nowhere.

After studying this issue for several months in the late nineties, I had to conclude that there is absolutely no way to know if our elections are honest or not. So far as I can tell, nothing has changed since then.

So did Sanders win "fair and square"?

We cannot know.

June 13, 2008

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