AlexClarke

Visduh Oct. 5, 2016 @ 8:15 p.m.

It is hard to imagine the AGC ever encountering a school bond issue that it didn't like. Remember that most such borrowing propositions use the money for construction, and the AGC is all about building things. So, it is to the advantage of the industry to see many such bond issues approved. (There is one fly in the ointment today. "Technology" can consume some of the money borrowed. That means buying computers, and the darned things are obsolete about as soon as they are bought. After a few years, they need replacing, and the cycle starts again.)

The bond issues today are far too easy to pass. Before the law change, they were hard to get approved. Despite that, some years ago, the San Ysidro district did get its voters to approve a multi-year, half-billion dollar plan, even though the district had no immediate plans to borrow and spend that much. One can only assume that the voters of that small and poor district figured that "the man" (their landlords) would pay the resultant taxes. Or they thought they would not be around to have to worry about it.

District after district is putting such financing measures on the ballot. What ever happened to the notion that the state is paying for public education? The affluent districts and an occasional poor one can tax themselves to excess to pay for new schools, gyms, stadia, etc. and provide something that the poorer areas will never afford. Yet while the court decision that mandated equal funding for schools still stands, it appears to have no effect on these borrowing plans.

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Ponzi Oct. 6, 2016 @ 8:06 p.m.

Duncan Hunter is a clown that needs to be recalled or never elected to any public office again. Vaping in the chambers of congress, embezzling money for private use from his campaign funds, supporting Donald Trump. What a hack. I have to believe that the people that voted for this clown were used to voting for his dad and didn't know his son was replacing him.

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Visduh Feb. 11, 2017 @ 5:52 p.m.

The quote of the years spent running the store as "amazing" is typical of the new use of that adjective. Just what was "amazing" isn't clear; neither is the definition of it. From the travails reported, I'd guess it was amazingly bad, amazingly frustrating, and ultimately amazingly intolerable. No business should have to put up with those daily outrages in a city that calls itself "America's Finest." Oh, good ol' OB has always been tolerant, funky, and hang-loose, but that doesn't excuse how far it has fallen into being a cesspool of human wretchedness. If the city of SD is to ever claim to be something close to first world, spots like OB need to be cleaned up, and kept cleaned up. Sheesh!

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dwbat Nov. 12, 2014 @ 4:53 p.m.

So I guess one could call them Falic symbols of suspicious contributions!

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Ponzi Feb. 17, 2017 @ 11:01 a.m.

The curfew is from 11:30 p.m. to 6:30 a.m.

There's a couple of questions I have about the number of complaints filed. If the airport recorded 1566 complaints of which 1086 were from one household, are there any "large numbers" of complaints also from single households in the remaining 480 complaints? In other words, if one address has reported over 1,000 complaints, it make me think that the remaining number of complaints may have come from 1, 2 or maybe just 5 other addresses. That's just the impression I get when one party is responsible for 2/3's of the complaints. I think maybe there are only a few people complaining and everyone else is La Jolla is coping, adapting or not really bothered by the noise.

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Flapper Feb. 18, 2017 @ 7:57 p.m.

Let's hear it from all of "them." We can either learn from them or let them make fools of themselves. We listen to our President, don't we?

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Visduh Feb. 18, 2017 @ 1:41 p.m.

I didn't have a vote in that election in that I reside in a different district. But I was rooting for her because of Davey's record. However, having her so indebted to big money, especially Sempra, is not a good thing at all. It really doesn't matter whose money they take to finance campaigns; there's too much money being spent on swaying voters who cannot study the issues and make up their own minds. When elected those pols are just as indebted to the big bucks contributors as if they had mortgaged their souls. Sad, really sad.

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dwbat Jan. 30, 2015 @ 8:14 p.m.

More likely it'll be Sanders Stadium! Then later it will be Faulconer Ferris Wheel.

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hwstar Jan. 22, 2017 @ 3:22 p.m.

America, the nation of the "fissured workplace". It used to be that companies actually cared more about there employees, saw them as an indirect way to be profitable, and therefore offered pensions and other fringe benefits. Since the mid 70's this started to change. Companies no longer thought long term, and considered regular employees a liability, and a cost center which they strived to mitigate through the use of staffing agencies. Staffing agencies typically offer no benefits to their contingent employees, and it is really easy for you to be cut loose as you have fewer protections working for the staffing agency then you do working directly for the company. I think in the long term this trend will reverse unless we lose our democracy and become a fascist dictatorship.

1

dwbat Dec. 7, 2016 @ 7:39 a.m.

The hotel design looks like it came from an Architects R Us franchise in a Waco, TX strip mall.

1

Javajoe25 Dec. 10, 2016 @ 8:24 a.m.

Homeless in the trees, homeless on the benches, homeless on the grass, homeless on the street corner, homeless at the highway exit, homeless on the meridian, homeless under the bridges, homeless down at the river, homeless in the supermarket, homeless in the coffeehouse, homeless in the library, homeless in the alley, homeless everywhere. I can't wait to see how this all gets better as we Make America Great Again. ha.

1

northparkrick Feb. 16, 2017 @ 8:32 p.m.

@ Cory Wixom: If you truly live "right next to" Jack in the Box, as you state and have "been going there for 25 years", yet contend it "literally looks exactly the same as before", it's hard to imagine how you missed the demolition and construction of the new restaurant. Simply compare the photographs included in Dorian's article - sorry, but you can't just simply paint a second story level to the elevation. Perhaps you were out of town during the months long construction, and missed the photographs of the site documenting the old building completely torn down?

Cory Briggs is not "driving the lawsuit", residents are. And what "costs the city millions of dollars" is the city itself by not obeying its own laws. Briggs wins lawsuits, the city pays for breaking the law. Not sure how that makes him a con artist...? All the city has to do is start following its own laws, they don't get to pick and choose which laws to follow nor who they allow to bend or ignore those laws. A level playing field for all. What a concept! With that, Briggs wouldn't have those lawsuits to file, and those millions could be used to fill all those 'Dean Spanos triggered potholes'.

@AlexClarke: The idea of requiring JIB to tear down the structure is enticing, and although there's a faction who would like to see Jack gone altogether, the lawsuit's focus is the drive through, in violation of city zoning laws. Stay if you want, Jack, this was never about your restaurant. Make it a walk-up window, a ride-your-bike-up window, whatever, just get rid of the illegal drive through and ease the traffic impacts to this residential neighborhood.

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Don Bauder Jan. 29, 2017 @ 7:19 p.m.

Founder: Trump is doing as good a job making Americans hostile as Mark Fabiani did making San Diegans hostile. Best, Don Bauder

1

amorpheous March 16, 2017 @ 2:06 p.m.

Everyone is giving Trump far more credit for actually doing any work. Trump is salesman-in-chief who is just signing the documents being created by Steve Bannon, etc. The only thing Trump has been doing himself is spewing rhetoric to distract the American public from the horrible things his cabinet and congress have been doing. Our country is being dismantled from within for the benefit of the corporations and special interests that are part of the emerging kleptocracy, at the expense of everyone else. Meanwhile, we have seen no meaningful job creation legislation from the White House.

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dwbat March 7, 2015 @ 9:39 a.m.

Chula Vista, Encinitas, and El Cajon are not "neighborhoods"; they are cities.

1

mystyinsandiego March 8, 2015 @ 4:06 a.m.

Students are missing out on some great experiences for a some "test." Some of us do well and others do. I don't remember any test I took as a child. But I do remember square-dancing, creating those clay mugs that leaked for my dad, great teachers like Mr. Gove, PE and art! I miss art. Students are missing out on all the great activities we once had as students. Education has been starved at the students' end and administrators seem to be part of this big test taking agenda that seems to be financially and esthetically motivated. I think the community needs to take heed and stop the madness. On a positive note, it seems like teachers are finally starting to make connections. We need to get out of our fishbowls and be part of the solution. What is the end of result of all this? Pipeline to Prison, a country of "failures", or the breaking down of society with the 1% controlling the rest of the country through an oligarchy. Something needs to change or we are doomed. We need to give our children time to internalize and become critical thinkers. Purpose testing in the classroom is fine but there is no way that students are going to delve deeper when they are worried about how a test is going to affect them in the future. Everything is so punitive. This method is NOT going to create scientist or mathematicians.

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