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Chateau Beau Soleil: a twinge of nostalgia in Sunset Cliffs

Infinity pool, glass elevator, private theater, and an expansive subterranean garage are just a few of the amenities

Indoor/outdoor design means you can see the sea — and be seen.
Indoor/outdoor design means you can see the sea — and be seen.

Twenty-ish years ago, my weekends often involved meeting a handful of friends at my Ocean Beach apartment before a leisurely bike ride along Sunset Cliffs. We’d head as far south as we could, stash our bikes (which were, remarkably, never stolen) somewhere past the parking lot off Ladera, and scramble down the cliffs to walk as far as the tide would allow along the beaches below Point Loma Nazarene University. During the leisurely two-mile pedal back into town, my gaze would alternate between the sea to my left and the glorious houses, both new and old, perched just above road level to take advantage of the unobstructed views (well, except by the hundreds of people who flock to the cliff-edge trails) over the Pacific.

I wouldn’t have seen this week’s entry, Chateau Beau Soleil, on any of these rides, however, as the 7500-square-foot home that the Zillow agent remarks describe as an “unparalleled oceanfront masterpiece” wasn’t built until 2014. When I saw its listing pop up — the opening aerial photo showing not just the house, but the cliffs themselves, populated by the familiar joggers, strollers, and sightseers ignoring the signs to stay away from the unstable edges of the bluff — I was struck by a twinge of nostalgia. Let’s have a look at the place, shall we?

The first on-property photo on our tour highlights the “exquisite infinity pool and spa” looking west. Given the fact that you wouldn’t want to spoil the view with a fence, the yard doesn’t exactly offer a ton of privacy, but unless a house nerd like me happens by, I’m pretty sure that most pedestrians are more interested in watching the breaking waves across the street. More views of the backyard show extensive stonework on the patio, and liberal use of those “vanishing glass doors that effortlessly blur the line between indoor and outdoor living.”

Something new: an elevator as a design element.

An oversized arched door leads us into a rather austere entry. There are a couple of white chairs here, but I’m not sure why anyone would choose to sit in a room with absolutely nothing to look at except for the front door. Let’s assume it gets better moving on. There’s a room under the stairs that looks like a bar or a kitchenette: we’ve got a sink, icemaker, wine fridge, and some cabinet space. Why is this room here? Who wants to leave the party outside to go into this little box for a glass of wine?

Our next stop is the “floating teak spiral staircase encircling a glass elevator” that make stops at each of the home’s four levels. We’ve seen private elevators before, but this round one (and the staircase surrounding it) looks a bit more impressive than the standard enclosed box tucked somewhere out of the way. An elevator as a design element rather than simply a functional conveyance is new to me, even after looking at hundreds of fancy homes like this. Nicely done.

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An upper-level living room offers a stone fireplace and another one of those retractable glass walls leading to a deck outside; next to it, there’s a dining room with seating for 12. Also, a second fireplace, this one a fake gas (or electric?) wall insert. The requisite “gourmet chef-inspired kitchen equipped with top-of-the-line appliances” is featured, as usual, though the layout of this one is a little odd, with the range on one island, the sink on another, and a handful of other spaces that I can’t quite figure out from the listing photos. It would take some getting used to, but I think I could grow to like cooking here.

The primary suite has yet another fireplace and more of those giant glass doors, along with “a dressing chamber, a vanity room, and a stone-encased soaking tub with a mesmerizing ocean backdrop.” From there, the tour continues with a peek into the home’s other four bedrooms and a few of its eight baths, stopping at the “executive office” before arriving at “the crowning glory of the home, referred to as the ‘turret’ by the architect,” which “grants a 360-degree panoramic view that is nothing short of breathtaking.” It seems nice enough up here, and I enjoy the exposed-beam wood ceilings, but after seeing the lower levels and hearing the pitch for this space, I thought maybe the windows would be a bit bigger.

The rest of the photos take us on a speed run of typical luxury features, including a private theater that looks comfortable (if a bit generic), a home gym where an egg-shaped sofa features as prominently as the few pieces of cardio equipment on display, and another bath and pair of patios we missed previously. There’s also “an expansive subterranean garage spanning 3000 square feet, designed to provide a secure sanctuary for up to six of your cherished vehicles.” Given that we’re in Sunset Cliffs, I suppose this makes sense, but underground garages have been tried in other parts of OB with considerably less success.

“This home presents an extraordinary opportunity that is sure to captivate the admiration of anyone who lays eyes upon it,” the listing concludes. Public records list a Miramontes and Thompson trust as the current owners, with the last sale having occurred in 2011 for $1.7 million — three years before the current home was reportedly built. It was first offered for sale earlier this year with an asking price of $9.5 million, in early October the price was reduced to $8,999,000, where it remains to date.

889 Sunset Cliffs Boulevard | San Diego, 92107

Current owner: Miramontes & Thompson Trust | Listing price: $8,999,000 | Beds: 5 | Baths: 8 | House size: 7500 sq ft

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Indoor/outdoor design means you can see the sea — and be seen.
Indoor/outdoor design means you can see the sea — and be seen.

Twenty-ish years ago, my weekends often involved meeting a handful of friends at my Ocean Beach apartment before a leisurely bike ride along Sunset Cliffs. We’d head as far south as we could, stash our bikes (which were, remarkably, never stolen) somewhere past the parking lot off Ladera, and scramble down the cliffs to walk as far as the tide would allow along the beaches below Point Loma Nazarene University. During the leisurely two-mile pedal back into town, my gaze would alternate between the sea to my left and the glorious houses, both new and old, perched just above road level to take advantage of the unobstructed views (well, except by the hundreds of people who flock to the cliff-edge trails) over the Pacific.

I wouldn’t have seen this week’s entry, Chateau Beau Soleil, on any of these rides, however, as the 7500-square-foot home that the Zillow agent remarks describe as an “unparalleled oceanfront masterpiece” wasn’t built until 2014. When I saw its listing pop up — the opening aerial photo showing not just the house, but the cliffs themselves, populated by the familiar joggers, strollers, and sightseers ignoring the signs to stay away from the unstable edges of the bluff — I was struck by a twinge of nostalgia. Let’s have a look at the place, shall we?

The first on-property photo on our tour highlights the “exquisite infinity pool and spa” looking west. Given the fact that you wouldn’t want to spoil the view with a fence, the yard doesn’t exactly offer a ton of privacy, but unless a house nerd like me happens by, I’m pretty sure that most pedestrians are more interested in watching the breaking waves across the street. More views of the backyard show extensive stonework on the patio, and liberal use of those “vanishing glass doors that effortlessly blur the line between indoor and outdoor living.”

Something new: an elevator as a design element.

An oversized arched door leads us into a rather austere entry. There are a couple of white chairs here, but I’m not sure why anyone would choose to sit in a room with absolutely nothing to look at except for the front door. Let’s assume it gets better moving on. There’s a room under the stairs that looks like a bar or a kitchenette: we’ve got a sink, icemaker, wine fridge, and some cabinet space. Why is this room here? Who wants to leave the party outside to go into this little box for a glass of wine?

Our next stop is the “floating teak spiral staircase encircling a glass elevator” that make stops at each of the home’s four levels. We’ve seen private elevators before, but this round one (and the staircase surrounding it) looks a bit more impressive than the standard enclosed box tucked somewhere out of the way. An elevator as a design element rather than simply a functional conveyance is new to me, even after looking at hundreds of fancy homes like this. Nicely done.

Sponsored
Sponsored

An upper-level living room offers a stone fireplace and another one of those retractable glass walls leading to a deck outside; next to it, there’s a dining room with seating for 12. Also, a second fireplace, this one a fake gas (or electric?) wall insert. The requisite “gourmet chef-inspired kitchen equipped with top-of-the-line appliances” is featured, as usual, though the layout of this one is a little odd, with the range on one island, the sink on another, and a handful of other spaces that I can’t quite figure out from the listing photos. It would take some getting used to, but I think I could grow to like cooking here.

The primary suite has yet another fireplace and more of those giant glass doors, along with “a dressing chamber, a vanity room, and a stone-encased soaking tub with a mesmerizing ocean backdrop.” From there, the tour continues with a peek into the home’s other four bedrooms and a few of its eight baths, stopping at the “executive office” before arriving at “the crowning glory of the home, referred to as the ‘turret’ by the architect,” which “grants a 360-degree panoramic view that is nothing short of breathtaking.” It seems nice enough up here, and I enjoy the exposed-beam wood ceilings, but after seeing the lower levels and hearing the pitch for this space, I thought maybe the windows would be a bit bigger.

The rest of the photos take us on a speed run of typical luxury features, including a private theater that looks comfortable (if a bit generic), a home gym where an egg-shaped sofa features as prominently as the few pieces of cardio equipment on display, and another bath and pair of patios we missed previously. There’s also “an expansive subterranean garage spanning 3000 square feet, designed to provide a secure sanctuary for up to six of your cherished vehicles.” Given that we’re in Sunset Cliffs, I suppose this makes sense, but underground garages have been tried in other parts of OB with considerably less success.

“This home presents an extraordinary opportunity that is sure to captivate the admiration of anyone who lays eyes upon it,” the listing concludes. Public records list a Miramontes and Thompson trust as the current owners, with the last sale having occurred in 2011 for $1.7 million — three years before the current home was reportedly built. It was first offered for sale earlier this year with an asking price of $9.5 million, in early October the price was reduced to $8,999,000, where it remains to date.

889 Sunset Cliffs Boulevard | San Diego, 92107

Current owner: Miramontes & Thompson Trust | Listing price: $8,999,000 | Beds: 5 | Baths: 8 | House size: 7500 sq ft

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