4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Used vinyl cheaper in Tijuana

Psychedelic rock rarities turn up at late March fair

Vinyl fair dealers. “Tijuana is considered the rock capital of Mexico."
Vinyl fair dealers. “Tijuana is considered the rock capital of Mexico."

On March 26-27, an estimated 20 San Diegans rendezvoused with about 3000 other record collectors and dealers at the Pasaje Rodríguez on Avenida Revolución in Tijuana for the Fifth Tijuana Vinyl Fair.

“I found an extremely rare 'City of the Angels' single by Los Walker de Tijuana.”

“[I found] an extremely rare 'City of the Angels' single by Los Walker de Tijuana,” said Lucio Soto. “Currently, I exclusively look for Tijuana oldies bands from the 60s and 70s.”

Soto’s been stockpiling records at his Escondido home and storage lockers for the past 35 years.

“I am what you call a severe hard-core vinyl junkie. I am about 50,000 records deep in my collection.”

"The vendors brought rare records of Mexican psychedelic rock, which ranged from 3,000-4,000 thousand pesos apiece."

“How much did you pay for that Los Walker de Tijuana seven-inch record?” I asked Soto.

“$325 USD …. although I’m not too comfortable carrying much cash in Mexico.”

Soto then direct-messaged me a photo of him holding a Feliz Navidad/Centro Musical De Tijuana, S.A. album that he purchased from Luis Enrique Acosta Jimenez for $300 USD.

“Luis takes my PayPal debit card. He’s a good guy: a straight shooter.”

I found Dug Dug’s circa 1974 Cambia Cambia album selling for 1,100 pesos.

Luis Enrique Acosta Jimenez owns La Rola Records on 5th Avenue by Avenida Revolución; he’s a co-founder of the Tijuana Vinyl Fair.

“Our used vinyl prices on English [sung] rock and Mexican national music is more economical compared to the U.S. prices,” he said to me, “although, on the new vinyl reissues, we are five percent more expensive here in Tijuana.”

Armando Nava, guitar player and keyboardist of Dug Dug’s, a 60’s-70’s psychedelic rock band, signed autographs.

“About 20 record vendors sold at our show,” continued Pedro Serrano, the other co-founder of the vinyl fair, “they came from other regions and cities in Mexico. They brought rare records of Mexican psychedelic rock, which ranged from 3,000-4,000 thousand pesos ($147- $196 USD) apiece.”

Armando Nava, guitar player and keyboardist of Dug Dug’s, a 60’s-70’s psychedelic rock band, signed autographs at the record show. His group’s albums — which contain early Mexican rock songs inspired and created in Tijuana, and some sung in English — are fetching hundreds of dollars on U.S. eBay.

“We sell our records to the whole world via eBay and to our customers on the store page,” Serrano continued.

“Tijuana is considered the rock capital of Mexico. Playing at advanced levels, our groups played to mostly American audiences on Avenida Revolución back then. We had Dug Dug’s, El Ritual, Peace and Love, Live Army, El Pájaro Alberto and Javier Batiz.

Lucio Soto of Escondido: “I am what you call a severe hard-core vinyl junkie. I am about 50,000 records deep in my collection.”

None of the record collectors or dealers I spoke with utilize Mercado Libre, a Latin-American version of eBay. On this buying and selling platform, I found Dug Dug’s circa 1974 Cambia Cambia album selling for 1,100 pesos ($54 USD), a bargain, considering nobody on the U.S. eBay platform is selling it.

“Tijuana oldies are spiking up in prices,” continued Soto, the Escondido collector, “it’s trending now.”

“If I buy a bunch of records in Tijuana and bring them back to San Diego, how do I stash them in the car, so they don’t warp inside a hot interior or trunk while waiting in line in the summertime,” I asked the record collectors.

“My guess is to keep them upright,” suggested Soto.

“The best way to transport them is with special heat-insulating suitcases that are kept in the shade inside the vehicle,” Serrano said.

Serrano’s a second-generation record dealer who ships records to his clients within the U.S. via USPS’s media mail, which costs about $3 to send a single record and about $5 for a stack of five records.

“Do the U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents or Mexican customs officials trip out on your records?” I asked.

“We always cross vinyl, and taxes are not required since they are cultural materials.”

There are about ten record stores listed in Tijuana on a Google search. Acosta Jimenez said their next vinyl show is on June 26 and 27.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

How San Diego moms cope with Zoom

The green pod has math and the yellow pod has humanities. At 10, red and blue pods have independent work time.
Next Article

How San Diego moms cope with Zoom

The green pod has math and the yellow pod has humanities. At 10, red and blue pods have independent work time.
Vinyl fair dealers. “Tijuana is considered the rock capital of Mexico."
Vinyl fair dealers. “Tijuana is considered the rock capital of Mexico."

On March 26-27, an estimated 20 San Diegans rendezvoused with about 3000 other record collectors and dealers at the Pasaje Rodríguez on Avenida Revolución in Tijuana for the Fifth Tijuana Vinyl Fair.

“I found an extremely rare 'City of the Angels' single by Los Walker de Tijuana.”

“[I found] an extremely rare 'City of the Angels' single by Los Walker de Tijuana,” said Lucio Soto. “Currently, I exclusively look for Tijuana oldies bands from the 60s and 70s.”

Soto’s been stockpiling records at his Escondido home and storage lockers for the past 35 years.

“I am what you call a severe hard-core vinyl junkie. I am about 50,000 records deep in my collection.”

"The vendors brought rare records of Mexican psychedelic rock, which ranged from 3,000-4,000 thousand pesos apiece."

“How much did you pay for that Los Walker de Tijuana seven-inch record?” I asked Soto.

“$325 USD …. although I’m not too comfortable carrying much cash in Mexico.”

Soto then direct-messaged me a photo of him holding a Feliz Navidad/Centro Musical De Tijuana, S.A. album that he purchased from Luis Enrique Acosta Jimenez for $300 USD.

“Luis takes my PayPal debit card. He’s a good guy: a straight shooter.”

I found Dug Dug’s circa 1974 Cambia Cambia album selling for 1,100 pesos.

Luis Enrique Acosta Jimenez owns La Rola Records on 5th Avenue by Avenida Revolución; he’s a co-founder of the Tijuana Vinyl Fair.

“Our used vinyl prices on English [sung] rock and Mexican national music is more economical compared to the U.S. prices,” he said to me, “although, on the new vinyl reissues, we are five percent more expensive here in Tijuana.”

Armando Nava, guitar player and keyboardist of Dug Dug’s, a 60’s-70’s psychedelic rock band, signed autographs.

“About 20 record vendors sold at our show,” continued Pedro Serrano, the other co-founder of the vinyl fair, “they came from other regions and cities in Mexico. They brought rare records of Mexican psychedelic rock, which ranged from 3,000-4,000 thousand pesos ($147- $196 USD) apiece.”

Armando Nava, guitar player and keyboardist of Dug Dug’s, a 60’s-70’s psychedelic rock band, signed autographs at the record show. His group’s albums — which contain early Mexican rock songs inspired and created in Tijuana, and some sung in English — are fetching hundreds of dollars on U.S. eBay.

“We sell our records to the whole world via eBay and to our customers on the store page,” Serrano continued.

“Tijuana is considered the rock capital of Mexico. Playing at advanced levels, our groups played to mostly American audiences on Avenida Revolución back then. We had Dug Dug’s, El Ritual, Peace and Love, Live Army, El Pájaro Alberto and Javier Batiz.

Lucio Soto of Escondido: “I am what you call a severe hard-core vinyl junkie. I am about 50,000 records deep in my collection.”

None of the record collectors or dealers I spoke with utilize Mercado Libre, a Latin-American version of eBay. On this buying and selling platform, I found Dug Dug’s circa 1974 Cambia Cambia album selling for 1,100 pesos ($54 USD), a bargain, considering nobody on the U.S. eBay platform is selling it.

“Tijuana oldies are spiking up in prices,” continued Soto, the Escondido collector, “it’s trending now.”

“If I buy a bunch of records in Tijuana and bring them back to San Diego, how do I stash them in the car, so they don’t warp inside a hot interior or trunk while waiting in line in the summertime,” I asked the record collectors.

“My guess is to keep them upright,” suggested Soto.

“The best way to transport them is with special heat-insulating suitcases that are kept in the shade inside the vehicle,” Serrano said.

Serrano’s a second-generation record dealer who ships records to his clients within the U.S. via USPS’s media mail, which costs about $3 to send a single record and about $5 for a stack of five records.

“Do the U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents or Mexican customs officials trip out on your records?” I asked.

“We always cross vinyl, and taxes are not required since they are cultural materials.”

There are about ten record stores listed in Tijuana on a Google search. Acosta Jimenez said their next vinyl show is on June 26 and 27.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

How San Diego moms cope with Zoom

The green pod has math and the yellow pod has humanities. At 10, red and blue pods have independent work time.
Next Article

T.S. Eliot’s “The Burial of the Dead” Part I of The Waste Land

One of the most important poets of the 20th century
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Drinks All Around — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close