4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Cavalier Mobile Home owners vs. the rest of the neighborhood

Barbara Villasenor convinced to re-erect fire lane gate

Cavalier's fire lane entrance on Stewart Street is only 0.8 miles from Oceanside fire station No. 2.
Cavalier's fire lane entrance on Stewart Street is only 0.8 miles from Oceanside fire station No. 2.

Bree Shook says a kind of class warfare has erupted between her 1,000 neighbors in the Cavalier Mobile Home Estates and the traditional homeowners who live in the South Oceanside neighborhood that overlooks them. “They basically said you’re trash and you don’t get to use our roads.”

A group of South Oceanside homeowners surrounding Stewart and Laguna Streets launched a Go Fund Me page and raised $5000 to build a gate that would prevent traffic from entering their neighborhood from Cavalier’s Hillside Lane. Those neighbors quietly worked behind the scenes to get the gate erected on October 5.

The mobile home tenants were never officially notified that they would no longer be able to use Hillside Lane also used for emergency access. Cavalier park owner Brian Alex was not notified until three days before gate construction began.

South Oceanside homeowners surrounding Stewart and Laguna Streets launched a Go Fund Me page and raised $5000 to build a gate.

Cavalier’s main entrance on Oceanside Boulevard just west of I-5 is now the only way to get in or out of the 373-home park. It is blocked four times an hour when the Sprinter shuttle passes by.

The Stewart Street neighbors who put up the gate say that Cavalier’s Hillside Lane funneled too much high-speed, cut-through traffic into their neighborhood. Shook says that claim was overblown and certainly not worth closing off the road which is needed for emergencies. “Having less traffic for them is not worth our safety. What if we need an ambulance or we have a fire? Blocking that road means bottleneck. That extra two or three minutes it takes a fire truck to get here could mean life or death.”

“I told the city the same thing,” says Cavalier resident Dennis Eller. “I told them a lock on the gate could be construed in court as a delay to get to Cavalier residents in an emergency.”

At 11 pm on Tuesday October 13, a fire started in the back wall of Mike Broeker’s home at 231 Blue Springs Lane.

“It started in the bedroom closet because of old aluminum wiring in the wall,” says Arden Miller who is a friend of Broeker. “He got out but didn’t know if his son had gotten out, so he ran back in.” Miller points to the blood when he was cut by a broken sliding glass door. “He inhaled a lot of smoke.” Broeker was airlifted to Scripps La Jolla where he remains in critical condition. His son Legend and his mother were not hurt.

Some Cavalier residents have a number of questions. Some noted that one fire truck showed up at the fire lane entrance but did not have a key to get in the newly installed gate and had to go around to the front.

“The fire started in the bedroom closet because of old aluminum wiring in the wall.”

That is true, says Oceanside Fire Division Chief of Community Risk David Parsons. But Parsons explains that truck was sent only as a back-up by the Vista Fire Department and was not a first responder.

Cavalier's fire lane entrance on Stewart Street is only 0.8 miles from Oceanside fire station No. 2. Why did the truck from the station No. 2 instead take the Coast Highway route to Cavalier’s front gate which is 1.4-miles away and has six intersections with traffic lights?

“The routing choices we make has to do with the time of the day and knowledge of the roads,” says Parsons. He says the dips and road humps on Stewart Street might actually make the shorter route take longer.

Division Chief Parsons says the first responder arrival time of 5:53 was “…within our standards.”

Miller says he anticipates a lawsuit over the fire lane gate. “We know for a fact that the owner of the park has an attorney looking into this. We don’t always see eye to eye with him, but we are in complete agreement on this.”

Cavalier resident Eller says he is particularly miffed that the South O homeowners who paid for the gate have not even provided a gate key to Cavalier.

Cavalier manager Maricella Aquino says she can not comment on any potential lawsuit but that she is still waiting for a promised gate key. She says owner Brian Alex was not available for comment.

Mike Broeker and his son Legend

One of the South O residents who spearheaded the project is named Jim. He says he does not want to use his last name because of threats he has received since the gate went up. He says the gate was needed because the 100 cars a day that used to use the emergency access road for regular trips caused speeding traffic that made his South O neighborhood unsafe for children. “One of our neighbors was burglarized in the middle of the night. He woke to find someone in his house and was stabbed twice trying to hold the individual for the police.”

“What does that have to do with us?” asks Miller. “And how could he get threats when no one knows who he is?”

The fire lane was gated off for most of the last 50 years but was opened to through traffic about two-and-a-half years ago. Stewart Street neighbor Jim says he could not convince Cavalier to put the gate back up. Jim and his neighbors discovered that the top ten feet of the fire lane was actually owned by Barbara Villasenor who lives in the sprawling rancho estate at the north end of Stewart Street. She divorced from author Victor Villasenor 25 years ago. The two split ownership of the hillside residence.

Barbara Villasenor was recently convinced by the South O neighbors to let them re-erect the gate on her property at the top of the fire lane if they paid for it.

“Much of that traffic made the area dangerous and there have been accidents,” says Villasenor. “You know what they say, good fences make good neighbors. We’re aware some people are upset about the gate, on the other hand we have heard from many more people from Cavalier about how much they appreciate the gate and their safer, quieter streets.”

Oceanside’s deputy city manager Jonathan Borrego fast-tracked the gate’s permit approval. The Cavalier gate got no city council or planning commission review and the Cavalier residents were not in the loop. He was out of town and not available for comment.

I pointed out to Villasenor that some of the Cavalier neighbors down below have complained that the hillside above them owned by the Villasenors is full of dead trees and brush that could fuel a fire. “Yes, that is something that is being dealt with,” she says.

Jim admits that Cavalier residents are continuing to park up above in his South O neighborhood and then walk down the fire lane to their mobile home. Jim says based on conversations he has had with city staff, he is confident that after the first of the year the city will issue permits so that only South O residents who live in the Stewart Street neighborhood will be allowed to park on city streets near their homes.

One Oceanside staffer who did not want to be named says that the city only allows permit parking for city streets in “very rare occasions” and that it probably will not happen in South O.

A Go Fund Me account has been set up for Mike Broeker.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Ichiban: glowing with a cozy openness

This is the kind of izakaya I could end up at near the end of every day.
Next Article

Paramahansa Yogananda style

“We employ the mind and study the scriptures, but it’s more a work from the heart”
Cavalier's fire lane entrance on Stewart Street is only 0.8 miles from Oceanside fire station No. 2.
Cavalier's fire lane entrance on Stewart Street is only 0.8 miles from Oceanside fire station No. 2.

Bree Shook says a kind of class warfare has erupted between her 1,000 neighbors in the Cavalier Mobile Home Estates and the traditional homeowners who live in the South Oceanside neighborhood that overlooks them. “They basically said you’re trash and you don’t get to use our roads.”

A group of South Oceanside homeowners surrounding Stewart and Laguna Streets launched a Go Fund Me page and raised $5000 to build a gate that would prevent traffic from entering their neighborhood from Cavalier’s Hillside Lane. Those neighbors quietly worked behind the scenes to get the gate erected on October 5.

The mobile home tenants were never officially notified that they would no longer be able to use Hillside Lane also used for emergency access. Cavalier park owner Brian Alex was not notified until three days before gate construction began.

South Oceanside homeowners surrounding Stewart and Laguna Streets launched a Go Fund Me page and raised $5000 to build a gate.

Cavalier’s main entrance on Oceanside Boulevard just west of I-5 is now the only way to get in or out of the 373-home park. It is blocked four times an hour when the Sprinter shuttle passes by.

The Stewart Street neighbors who put up the gate say that Cavalier’s Hillside Lane funneled too much high-speed, cut-through traffic into their neighborhood. Shook says that claim was overblown and certainly not worth closing off the road which is needed for emergencies. “Having less traffic for them is not worth our safety. What if we need an ambulance or we have a fire? Blocking that road means bottleneck. That extra two or three minutes it takes a fire truck to get here could mean life or death.”

“I told the city the same thing,” says Cavalier resident Dennis Eller. “I told them a lock on the gate could be construed in court as a delay to get to Cavalier residents in an emergency.”

At 11 pm on Tuesday October 13, a fire started in the back wall of Mike Broeker’s home at 231 Blue Springs Lane.

“It started in the bedroom closet because of old aluminum wiring in the wall,” says Arden Miller who is a friend of Broeker. “He got out but didn’t know if his son had gotten out, so he ran back in.” Miller points to the blood when he was cut by a broken sliding glass door. “He inhaled a lot of smoke.” Broeker was airlifted to Scripps La Jolla where he remains in critical condition. His son Legend and his mother were not hurt.

Some Cavalier residents have a number of questions. Some noted that one fire truck showed up at the fire lane entrance but did not have a key to get in the newly installed gate and had to go around to the front.

“The fire started in the bedroom closet because of old aluminum wiring in the wall.”

That is true, says Oceanside Fire Division Chief of Community Risk David Parsons. But Parsons explains that truck was sent only as a back-up by the Vista Fire Department and was not a first responder.

Cavalier's fire lane entrance on Stewart Street is only 0.8 miles from Oceanside fire station No. 2. Why did the truck from the station No. 2 instead take the Coast Highway route to Cavalier’s front gate which is 1.4-miles away and has six intersections with traffic lights?

“The routing choices we make has to do with the time of the day and knowledge of the roads,” says Parsons. He says the dips and road humps on Stewart Street might actually make the shorter route take longer.

Division Chief Parsons says the first responder arrival time of 5:53 was “…within our standards.”

Miller says he anticipates a lawsuit over the fire lane gate. “We know for a fact that the owner of the park has an attorney looking into this. We don’t always see eye to eye with him, but we are in complete agreement on this.”

Cavalier resident Eller says he is particularly miffed that the South O homeowners who paid for the gate have not even provided a gate key to Cavalier.

Cavalier manager Maricella Aquino says she can not comment on any potential lawsuit but that she is still waiting for a promised gate key. She says owner Brian Alex was not available for comment.

Mike Broeker and his son Legend

One of the South O residents who spearheaded the project is named Jim. He says he does not want to use his last name because of threats he has received since the gate went up. He says the gate was needed because the 100 cars a day that used to use the emergency access road for regular trips caused speeding traffic that made his South O neighborhood unsafe for children. “One of our neighbors was burglarized in the middle of the night. He woke to find someone in his house and was stabbed twice trying to hold the individual for the police.”

“What does that have to do with us?” asks Miller. “And how could he get threats when no one knows who he is?”

The fire lane was gated off for most of the last 50 years but was opened to through traffic about two-and-a-half years ago. Stewart Street neighbor Jim says he could not convince Cavalier to put the gate back up. Jim and his neighbors discovered that the top ten feet of the fire lane was actually owned by Barbara Villasenor who lives in the sprawling rancho estate at the north end of Stewart Street. She divorced from author Victor Villasenor 25 years ago. The two split ownership of the hillside residence.

Barbara Villasenor was recently convinced by the South O neighbors to let them re-erect the gate on her property at the top of the fire lane if they paid for it.

“Much of that traffic made the area dangerous and there have been accidents,” says Villasenor. “You know what they say, good fences make good neighbors. We’re aware some people are upset about the gate, on the other hand we have heard from many more people from Cavalier about how much they appreciate the gate and their safer, quieter streets.”

Oceanside’s deputy city manager Jonathan Borrego fast-tracked the gate’s permit approval. The Cavalier gate got no city council or planning commission review and the Cavalier residents were not in the loop. He was out of town and not available for comment.

I pointed out to Villasenor that some of the Cavalier neighbors down below have complained that the hillside above them owned by the Villasenors is full of dead trees and brush that could fuel a fire. “Yes, that is something that is being dealt with,” she says.

Jim admits that Cavalier residents are continuing to park up above in his South O neighborhood and then walk down the fire lane to their mobile home. Jim says based on conversations he has had with city staff, he is confident that after the first of the year the city will issue permits so that only South O residents who live in the Stewart Street neighborhood will be allowed to park on city streets near their homes.

One Oceanside staffer who did not want to be named says that the city only allows permit parking for city streets in “very rare occasions” and that it probably will not happen in South O.

A Go Fund Me account has been set up for Mike Broeker.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Going beyond banh mi at Banh Mi Hoi An

Terrific take-out options include a warming beef stew
Next Article

Tijuana's respect for the body, goodbye Revolucion flower sellers. Frank Lloyd Wright and Tecate

Why Mexico loves Abe Lincoln, cardboard shacks replace by cultural beauty, Tijuana River brings us sewage
Comments
4

The link for the fundraiser doesn't go to Mike's page. Please change that if possible.

His Cavalier neighbors are very concerned about him because he's still on a ventilator and in critical condition.

https://www.facebook.com/donate/664788354173009/10223510513418758/

Oct. 19, 2020
This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.
Oct. 20, 2020
This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.
Oct. 20, 2020

OPD information officer Tom Bussey of the OPD just got back to me. He said that no one has filed any complaints with the OPD re threatened violence or property damage against residents of the Stewart Street neighborhood. He said the only complaints involve parking on city streets and a high profile truck that took out some branches as it drove by. Either Jim was lying about the threat or he decided to not contact the police after he received this very serious threat.

Oct. 20, 2020

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close