Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

High dollar execs remain on board as KPBS layoffs go viral

Public broadcaster could shrink further amid SDSU budget cuts

Taxpayers forked over $7.2 million in "university transfers" from SDSU to KPBS in 2019.
Taxpayers forked over $7.2 million in "university transfers" from SDSU to KPBS in 2019.

COVID-19 has finally hit KPBS – the San Diego State University-controlled and funded public broadcasting operation – where it hurts: in the payroll.

Three staff layoffs, along with a fifty percent cut in the hours of another 15 employees effective July 1, per a Union-Tribune January 22 account, triggered campus complaints that the stations had axed workers in favor of a lavish new KPBS headquarters.

General manager Tom Karlo received $257,289 in salary and benefits during 2019.

As noted here December 30, the SDSU affiliate raised $26,225,000 in "gifts and pledges" during fiscal 2019 for its ongoing Capital Campaign, per a November 26, 2019 financial report.

But COVID-19-related cutbacks faced by SDSU – which picks up a significant portion of the stations' costs – may be contributing to KPBS’s budget pinch.

Taxpayers forked over $7.2 million in "university transfers" from SDSU to KPBS during fiscal 2019, the November financial report says, versus $7.1 million the year before.

Under the latest of California's rapidly shifting proposed budget deals, the state university system – including SDSU – and the University of California would suffer more than a billion dollars in budget cuts, aggravating SDSU’s financial woes.

A hoped-for federal bailout under the so-called HEROES Act, might offset the reductions during the current budget period, but the future is uncertain.

"Passage of the HEROES Act will also determine whether UC's and CSU's budgets will be cut significantly," noted EdSource in a June 23 account of the budget negotiations between legislators and Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom.

Nancy Worlie, associate general manager for content and communications, got $142,027.

"Newsom had proposed cutting $1.17 billion in combined cuts and to rescind $770 of that amount through federal funding. The final deal calls for cutting $970 million — $470 million for UC and $500 million for CSU — which would be restored with federal coronavirus assistance."

Other burgeoning SDSU expenses may be putting pressure on KPBS's budget. Just three weeks before KPBS revealed the current round of staff cuts to the public, the university finally sealed an $86.2 million deal with San Diego city hall for the Mission Valley parcel, once known as Qualcomm Stadium.

According to the U-T's account of the new layoffs, a statement from KPBS announced "possible pay cuts of up to 10 percent for senior managers" in the unspecified future.

Based on salary numbers obtained under the state's public records act by TransparentCalifornia.com, compensation for highly paid top jobs was already shrinking.

General manager Tom Karlo, whose state university system title is Administrator IV, received a total of $257,289 in salary and benefits during 2019.

Karlo got $343,981 when he hit his earnings peak at the stations in 2018 before heading down last year. In 2017, Karlo received $333,106, according to data posted by TransparentCalifornia. In 2016 he got $314,654.

Nancy Worlie, associate general manager for content and communications, an Administrator III, got $142,027. In 2018, she received $191,012, per the TransparentCalifornia numbers. A year earlier, her compensation was $182,301.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Bobbi and Mark sleep above the lions in Alpine

Lions Tigers & Bears is not a zoo
Next Article

Dress up with cork wedges from Aerosoles and a necklace from Pier 1

“For three months, I existed only on yoga pants and sweatpants.”
Taxpayers forked over $7.2 million in "university transfers" from SDSU to KPBS in 2019.
Taxpayers forked over $7.2 million in "university transfers" from SDSU to KPBS in 2019.

COVID-19 has finally hit KPBS – the San Diego State University-controlled and funded public broadcasting operation – where it hurts: in the payroll.

Three staff layoffs, along with a fifty percent cut in the hours of another 15 employees effective July 1, per a Union-Tribune January 22 account, triggered campus complaints that the stations had axed workers in favor of a lavish new KPBS headquarters.

General manager Tom Karlo received $257,289 in salary and benefits during 2019.

As noted here December 30, the SDSU affiliate raised $26,225,000 in "gifts and pledges" during fiscal 2019 for its ongoing Capital Campaign, per a November 26, 2019 financial report.

But COVID-19-related cutbacks faced by SDSU – which picks up a significant portion of the stations' costs – may be contributing to KPBS’s budget pinch.

Taxpayers forked over $7.2 million in "university transfers" from SDSU to KPBS during fiscal 2019, the November financial report says, versus $7.1 million the year before.

Under the latest of California's rapidly shifting proposed budget deals, the state university system – including SDSU – and the University of California would suffer more than a billion dollars in budget cuts, aggravating SDSU’s financial woes.

A hoped-for federal bailout under the so-called HEROES Act, might offset the reductions during the current budget period, but the future is uncertain.

"Passage of the HEROES Act will also determine whether UC's and CSU's budgets will be cut significantly," noted EdSource in a June 23 account of the budget negotiations between legislators and Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom.

Nancy Worlie, associate general manager for content and communications, got $142,027.

"Newsom had proposed cutting $1.17 billion in combined cuts and to rescind $770 of that amount through federal funding. The final deal calls for cutting $970 million — $470 million for UC and $500 million for CSU — which would be restored with federal coronavirus assistance."

Other burgeoning SDSU expenses may be putting pressure on KPBS's budget. Just three weeks before KPBS revealed the current round of staff cuts to the public, the university finally sealed an $86.2 million deal with San Diego city hall for the Mission Valley parcel, once known as Qualcomm Stadium.

According to the U-T's account of the new layoffs, a statement from KPBS announced "possible pay cuts of up to 10 percent for senior managers" in the unspecified future.

Based on salary numbers obtained under the state's public records act by TransparentCalifornia.com, compensation for highly paid top jobs was already shrinking.

General manager Tom Karlo, whose state university system title is Administrator IV, received a total of $257,289 in salary and benefits during 2019.

Karlo got $343,981 when he hit his earnings peak at the stations in 2018 before heading down last year. In 2017, Karlo received $333,106, according to data posted by TransparentCalifornia. In 2016 he got $314,654.

Nancy Worlie, associate general manager for content and communications, an Administrator III, got $142,027. In 2018, she received $191,012, per the TransparentCalifornia numbers. A year earlier, her compensation was $182,301.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

The Truth: no better suited than Catherine Deneuve

Hers truly is an imitation of life.
Next Article

Fabian Nunez fails to work magic for Mercury lobbying firm

Santee's Mayor Minto can't write his column
Comments
2

What's wrong with KPBS ?

I try KPBS radio for local news daily. That's the station whose motto is: "Where News Matters". Despite all those annual million$, they seem unable to find any local news. They are good at interviewing politicians, disease experts, book authors, entertainers, scientists, pundits, restaurant owners and others who need the press coverage. They are happy to promote local businesses, venues, entertainments and themselves. But they don't keep up with the activities of any local government, any utility company, any community organization or planning group, or anyone who actually affects the lives of local citizens.

I don't want to say that they are afraid to offend their advertisers and political chums by telling the awful truth about them. I don't want to, but it seems to have slipped out anyway.

Despite the complaints, the U-T does have a couple good reporters. Voice of San Diego does some real journalism and they will sometimes name offenders (companies, individuals, politicians) who abuse the public trust. Not KPBS. At least we have the Reader and Matt Potter who probably get less than $26 million/year.

June 23, 2020

I fail to see what the top executives do to earn the big bucks. I understand top executives in for profit companies sharing in the profits but a non-profit should be just that. I would not donate to KPBS while their fat cat executives collect high pay while they lay off the people who actually do the work.

June 24, 2020

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close