Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Mocking minimalism from Dwell magazine

We vigorously defend our stuff; its existence becomes a point of pride.

Are hipsters secretly stuffy?
Are hipsters secretly stuffy?

Dear Hipster:

You made me LOL at your August 29th article where you said most people do not have room to park in their garages that are filled with boxes, many untouched for over ten years. That was a great observation for a hipster, and you could probably do an entire article about why most people do that. Maybe you can find out the real reason for that, and the reason behind storage facilities filled with even more old stuff. Why do people want to hold on to the past so much?

— Bill, Palm City

Stuff. Clutter. Junk. The average American, particularly in a place like California known for materialism, loves his stuff. It fills his house, overflows into his garage, then, the stuff must find a home in a self-storage unit somewhere. The stuff builds up to the point where it dominates; where it becomes, like a shady Wall Street investment firm in the later-aughts, too big to fail.

We vigorously defend our stuff; its existence becomes a point of pride. We say, “I’ll use this someday!” We say, “It’s too important; we can’t discard the past like so much trash, because it isn’t trash, it’s our stuff, damn it, and stuff is who we are. It is who we have been, and, if we’re really being aspirational, it’s who we hope to be again.” Why else do we save the bike and wetsuit from the one time we did that charity triathlon? Why else might we refuse to part with the old clothing that fit our younger, skinnier selves? Holding on to the past is often a vain promise for the future.

Elsewhere, it has become easy to mock the minimalist hipster aesthetic, epitomized in such places as Dwell magazine; in offices where people bring their portable dogs to work and enjoy kombucha on tap; or basically any coffee shop where young, hip people linger over flat whites as they eke out a living doing freelance graphic design because they were unable to score jobs at the aforementioned contemporary office complex.

Yeah, it’s easy to poke fun at people sitting in a room with little more than a single beanbag and a couple air plants, but nobody can deny it cuts down on stuff. Hipsters have broken this obsession with the personal, material past. They stay more present, or at least it seems that way from without. No matter who you are, you have to envy that, and to admit there is something inspired about shaking off the weight of so much stuff.

Yet, hipsters also love the past. Witness the constant resurgence of retro-chic everything. The constant plundering of a former era, where all that was gets repurposed into an updated version of what now is. For all their anti-materialistic freedom from the chains of their own consumer past, hipsters are and always have been obsessed with pop culture history, as if cultural treasure lies buried deep within society’s memory, and hipsters are the ones who will dig it up and marvel at how, considered through the lens of our perfect hindsight, the primitive cultures of the middle-third of the 20th century were actually pretty darn advanced in some ways.

This illuminates a trenchant difference between the nostalgia of the American mainstream nuclear familyperson and that of the modernist hipster: the former holds tremendous nostalgia for his own past, while the latter only glorifies someone else’s. Whatever else that leads to, it makes for much more room in hipster’s garages.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Mexico after the millenium

Smuggling, TJ nightlife, deported, TJ as hip destination, can't stop thinking about TJ, cross-border kidnapping
Are hipsters secretly stuffy?
Are hipsters secretly stuffy?

Dear Hipster:

You made me LOL at your August 29th article where you said most people do not have room to park in their garages that are filled with boxes, many untouched for over ten years. That was a great observation for a hipster, and you could probably do an entire article about why most people do that. Maybe you can find out the real reason for that, and the reason behind storage facilities filled with even more old stuff. Why do people want to hold on to the past so much?

— Bill, Palm City

Stuff. Clutter. Junk. The average American, particularly in a place like California known for materialism, loves his stuff. It fills his house, overflows into his garage, then, the stuff must find a home in a self-storage unit somewhere. The stuff builds up to the point where it dominates; where it becomes, like a shady Wall Street investment firm in the later-aughts, too big to fail.

We vigorously defend our stuff; its existence becomes a point of pride. We say, “I’ll use this someday!” We say, “It’s too important; we can’t discard the past like so much trash, because it isn’t trash, it’s our stuff, damn it, and stuff is who we are. It is who we have been, and, if we’re really being aspirational, it’s who we hope to be again.” Why else do we save the bike and wetsuit from the one time we did that charity triathlon? Why else might we refuse to part with the old clothing that fit our younger, skinnier selves? Holding on to the past is often a vain promise for the future.

Elsewhere, it has become easy to mock the minimalist hipster aesthetic, epitomized in such places as Dwell magazine; in offices where people bring their portable dogs to work and enjoy kombucha on tap; or basically any coffee shop where young, hip people linger over flat whites as they eke out a living doing freelance graphic design because they were unable to score jobs at the aforementioned contemporary office complex.

Yeah, it’s easy to poke fun at people sitting in a room with little more than a single beanbag and a couple air plants, but nobody can deny it cuts down on stuff. Hipsters have broken this obsession with the personal, material past. They stay more present, or at least it seems that way from without. No matter who you are, you have to envy that, and to admit there is something inspired about shaking off the weight of so much stuff.

Yet, hipsters also love the past. Witness the constant resurgence of retro-chic everything. The constant plundering of a former era, where all that was gets repurposed into an updated version of what now is. For all their anti-materialistic freedom from the chains of their own consumer past, hipsters are and always have been obsessed with pop culture history, as if cultural treasure lies buried deep within society’s memory, and hipsters are the ones who will dig it up and marvel at how, considered through the lens of our perfect hindsight, the primitive cultures of the middle-third of the 20th century were actually pretty darn advanced in some ways.

This illuminates a trenchant difference between the nostalgia of the American mainstream nuclear familyperson and that of the modernist hipster: the former holds tremendous nostalgia for his own past, while the latter only glorifies someone else’s. Whatever else that leads to, it makes for much more room in hipster’s garages.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Oceanside – eclecticism reigns

Oceanside Blvd. beach rip-rap, Fire Mountain incursion, airport death, growing up in Camp Pendleton housing, Oceanside Pier, Samoan gangs, Saint Malo, harbor vs. surfers
Next Article

NPR Livestream: The Dears, To Tame a Wild Tongue Charla (Talk), Cinema Under the Stars: Midnight In Paris

Events July 16-July 17, 2020
Comments
1

I believe this is the same for most people. I cannot believe how true to every word this article is. This is the most pertinent article I have read in the reader.

Sept. 20, 2019

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close