"Soon enough, the sand and sea will take it back."
  • "Soon enough, the sand and sea will take it back."
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On Sunday, a crew of lifeguards at Black’s Beach discovered that “the elusive steel ball” has resurfaced after a 2-year hiatus, this time washing up along the north end of the beach.

“We haven’t seen it in a few years, so it’s kinda fun to see it now!” a Black’s Beach regular exclaimed.

An off-duty lifeguard, speaking in an unofficial capacity told us, “It is believed to be an old mooring from some sort of naval ship or shipping container based out of Los Angeles or Long Beach; it made its way down the coast during an early 1980s El Niño winter, and made landfall in La Jolla at Black's Beach...it takes a lot of surf and a lot of sand movement to get it to relocate ‘naturally’ on the sand, which happens every so often during the large winter storms. Most of the time it stays buried.”

During periods of exposure though, the mooring often receives lots of love.

“It has been painted various times depicting nude beaches from across the world (since Black's is a nude beach), a pumpkin, and a golf ball in honor of the Torrey Pines Golf Course that rests above the bluff. Right now it sits about 100 yards south of Mussel Rocks, which is at the far north end of Black's Beach. Its size is probably around 5 ft in diameter…soon enough, the sand and sea will take it back under ground with the king tides and the hunt will continue.”

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Comments

Cassander Jan. 29, 2019 @ 12:50 p.m.

If my math is correct, and this thing is solid, it weighs almost exactly 16 tons.

I know nature is powerful, but wouldn't it make more sense to think it originated from either Oceanside or North Island/Point Loma than Long Beach or L.A.?

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llaumann Jan. 29, 2019 @ 3:49 p.m.

It would likely be a mooring buoy, so it likely floated at one time. I doubt that it is solid steel, but probably hollow.

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Ponzi Jan. 30, 2019 @ 12:24 p.m.

It doesn't appear to have Hertz horns.

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Robrage Jan. 30, 2019 @ 4:25 p.m.

You hit it with a sludge hammer..if it blows up it's a mine.

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dwbat Jan. 30, 2019 @ 10:25 p.m.

It'll work better if you use a sledgehammer! ;-)

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Miramatt March 29, 2019 @ 11:08 a.m.

I'd guess, because people who know what naval mines look like have looked at it and said it is not one.

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