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Spanish Colonial Revival architecture courtesy Richard Requa

The primary architect overseeing construction in Balboa Park for the California Pacific International Exposition

Want to be transported to another time? Just follow the russet brick road!
Want to be transported to another time? Just follow the russet brick road!

The historic Bowman-Cotton House, billed as “one of Point Loma’s most iconic waterfront homes,” was constructed in 1929 under the supervision of master architect Richard Requa.

Requa, who studied under one of Southern California’s most famous architects, Irving Gill, was himself highly regarded. He was, among other things, the primary architect overseeing construction in Balboa Park for the California Pacific International Exposition, the second of the two world’s fairs held in San Diego in 1934 and 1935.

One of the few private boat docks on the bay.

Before the Exposition, Requa focused on bayfront homes both in Point Loma and Coronado, where the “designs stand out examples of his creative imagination unfettered by the clients’ financial status.” The home at 2900 Nichols Street, with nearly 5000 square feet of living area and a one-third acre lot looking out onto the Shelter Island Yacht Basin, is one of those examples.

Per the listing, the home “epitomizes San Diego Spanish Colonial Revival architecture, with a contemporary touch inside.”

“Enter through the gates of this historic property into the lush courtyard and be transported to another time,” the promotional copy continues. Opening the mahogany front door reveals “stunning views to the waterfront just past the original, delicate wrought iron balustrade on the main staircase.”

Arched doorways lead to either the home’s living room or formal dining room, itself adjacent to “the gourmet eat-in kitchen, featuring marble counters, Viking appliances, beautiful stone flooring, a walk-in pantry, hand-carved arched mahogany pocket doors to the dining room, and direct access to the family room.”

The master suite includes two private balconies and an attached den with “floor to ceiling view window” along with his-and-hers walk-in closets and bath with steam shower. The home includes three more en-suite bedrooms, as well as a guest house that was reportedly once the cottage of a Portuguese fisherman, and a game room built to connect the structures.

A complete remodel was performed by Ione Stiegler of IS Architecture following the home’s most recent 2005 sale. Previously, the home was used as a wedding and party venue, much to the dismay of neighbors and the structure itself, which suffered heavy wear and deferred maintenance. While updating the interior, care was taken to preserve and restore the historic elements of the design, resulting in a Mills Act designation that allows any prospective purchaser to receive a significant property tax deduction.

In addition to a pool and beach house, the grounds offer direct beach access and one of the few private boat docks on the bay.

The Bowman-Cotton House last sold in 2010 for a reported $4.1 million before the renovation, though the home has a taxable value of just $874,000 and an annual tax bill of about $10,000. The current owners, Pacific Soethby’s Realty CEO Brian Arrington and wife Colby, listed the property for sale in early August with an $8,750,000 price tag that remains unchanged to date.

  • 2900 Nichols Street | Point Loma, 92106
  • Beds: 5 | Baths: 10 | Current Owners: Brian and Colby Arrington | List Price: $8,750,000
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Want to be transported to another time? Just follow the russet brick road!
Want to be transported to another time? Just follow the russet brick road!

The historic Bowman-Cotton House, billed as “one of Point Loma’s most iconic waterfront homes,” was constructed in 1929 under the supervision of master architect Richard Requa.

Requa, who studied under one of Southern California’s most famous architects, Irving Gill, was himself highly regarded. He was, among other things, the primary architect overseeing construction in Balboa Park for the California Pacific International Exposition, the second of the two world’s fairs held in San Diego in 1934 and 1935.

One of the few private boat docks on the bay.

Before the Exposition, Requa focused on bayfront homes both in Point Loma and Coronado, where the “designs stand out examples of his creative imagination unfettered by the clients’ financial status.” The home at 2900 Nichols Street, with nearly 5000 square feet of living area and a one-third acre lot looking out onto the Shelter Island Yacht Basin, is one of those examples.

Per the listing, the home “epitomizes San Diego Spanish Colonial Revival architecture, with a contemporary touch inside.”

“Enter through the gates of this historic property into the lush courtyard and be transported to another time,” the promotional copy continues. Opening the mahogany front door reveals “stunning views to the waterfront just past the original, delicate wrought iron balustrade on the main staircase.”

Arched doorways lead to either the home’s living room or formal dining room, itself adjacent to “the gourmet eat-in kitchen, featuring marble counters, Viking appliances, beautiful stone flooring, a walk-in pantry, hand-carved arched mahogany pocket doors to the dining room, and direct access to the family room.”

The master suite includes two private balconies and an attached den with “floor to ceiling view window” along with his-and-hers walk-in closets and bath with steam shower. The home includes three more en-suite bedrooms, as well as a guest house that was reportedly once the cottage of a Portuguese fisherman, and a game room built to connect the structures.

A complete remodel was performed by Ione Stiegler of IS Architecture following the home’s most recent 2005 sale. Previously, the home was used as a wedding and party venue, much to the dismay of neighbors and the structure itself, which suffered heavy wear and deferred maintenance. While updating the interior, care was taken to preserve and restore the historic elements of the design, resulting in a Mills Act designation that allows any prospective purchaser to receive a significant property tax deduction.

In addition to a pool and beach house, the grounds offer direct beach access and one of the few private boat docks on the bay.

The Bowman-Cotton House last sold in 2010 for a reported $4.1 million before the renovation, though the home has a taxable value of just $874,000 and an annual tax bill of about $10,000. The current owners, Pacific Soethby’s Realty CEO Brian Arrington and wife Colby, listed the property for sale in early August with an $8,750,000 price tag that remains unchanged to date.

  • 2900 Nichols Street | Point Loma, 92106
  • Beds: 5 | Baths: 10 | Current Owners: Brian and Colby Arrington | List Price: $8,750,000
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4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
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