Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

New Linda Vista apartments welcomes present tenants

Community HousingWorks doubles rent, but still cheap

Part of the apartment complex that spans 2601-2685 Ulric Street in Linda Vista.
Part of the apartment complex that spans 2601-2685 Ulric Street in Linda Vista.

Lillibelle and Jimmy have lived in their Linda Vista apartment complex for more than twenty years. So when the 36-apartment complex was sold for $8.3 million last year, the couple began keeping track of the buyer’s plans – especially after their rent was nearly doubled.

They don’t know exactly why it was sold, but assumed it had to do with settling the owner’s estate. When Community HousingWorks bought it, their rent jumped to $1,000. That’s still cheap, they say, and it helps a lot when you can’t work the way you used to.

The complex of nine buildings looks like it isn’t taken care of but has been individualized on a family by family basis. Christmas lights and picket fences, and homey touches give each four-plex character, as does the way it’s laid out. The nine buildings sprawl on almost three acres lot in two clusters separated by an access road. The cluster of five buildings are laid out in a bendy U-shape and the other four are laid out the long way to form an X. There’s big areas of green between them, free-standing four-plexes in a park setting. It gives the side-by-side, two-story apartments the feeling of a comfortable distance from the neighbors – enough so that nearly all of the residents haven’t put up fences.

“You can’t see into your neighbors’ houses and they can’t see into ours,” Jose, the former property manager, say. The Ulric Street complex is back to back with the Linda Vista Community Park, adding more green.

The complex was built during World War II for aircraft workers.

According to the lender website: “Many of the homes in Linda Vista were built in 1940-41 as part of a government project to house aircraft workers for the war effort. A construction project that began in October 1940 resulted in 3,000 houses being built within 200 days.”

Usually when such a complex is torn down for a larger affordable housing project, the people who lived on the site before construction have to get in line with all the other applicants, as required by the San Diego Housing Commission. But this time – and for only the second time in the city – the current residents who qualify for the low-rent apartments have dibs on them. (The first was in Rancho Penasquitos where developers of a market rate project agreed to build additional affordable housing.

“We petitioned the housing commission to allow people to return to the housing if they are eligible,” says Community HousingWorks Project Manager Sylvia Martinez. “I hope it sets a great precedent.”

Martinez regularly attends the Linda Vista Planning Group to share what the developer is thinking about and to hear community feedback. The planning group, led by Noli Zosa, has supported the project from the beginning, but with concerns about what will happen to current residents. In August, Martinez told the group that city housing commission rules blocked giving the current residents priority. But she went back to the housing commission and it looks like the poorer residents will be able to come back once construction ends.

Housingworks’ plans for the 2.9-acre property remain in flux. While the group is seeking zoning that will allow up to 188 apartments, the current thinking is around 108 units. The property is near a bus line, which means it gets more apartments and it’s affordable, which means parking requirements are relaxed.

Martinez says that affordable housing projects tell apartment applicants that they can have a limited number of cars and that management will be checking.

“We find people looking at North Park from El Cajon or Chula Vista wouldn’t think of getting rid of their cars,” Martinez says. “We keep track of cars our residents have – market-rate developers don’t have to.”

Several residents, including LilliBelle and Jimmy, and the former property manager, say they still feel like they don’t know what will happen next.

They praised their previous landlord, who’d set their rent $560 a month many years earlier, and told Jimmy to spend the rest of your money on something for himself, he says. They came from the Philippines and did what work came for them; and now Jimmy is on social security while Lillibelle keeps working

They’ve gone to a couple of planning group meetings, and they’re worried about what will happen. As they understand it, community housing works will help them find a place to live and help them move. But the plan they keep hearing about changes with each discussion.

“First they say 180 apartments, then they say 120, now we hear 105,” Jimmy says. “Neighbors say they will tear down those buildings first and we can stay in ours until that building is finished. But that doesn’t sound right.”

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Notice the difference in Zgara gyros

Bay Park counter shop deviates from processed Americana
Next Article

The floss silk tree and tarantula spiders

Natural San Diego, October 19-25
Part of the apartment complex that spans 2601-2685 Ulric Street in Linda Vista.
Part of the apartment complex that spans 2601-2685 Ulric Street in Linda Vista.

Lillibelle and Jimmy have lived in their Linda Vista apartment complex for more than twenty years. So when the 36-apartment complex was sold for $8.3 million last year, the couple began keeping track of the buyer’s plans – especially after their rent was nearly doubled.

They don’t know exactly why it was sold, but assumed it had to do with settling the owner’s estate. When Community HousingWorks bought it, their rent jumped to $1,000. That’s still cheap, they say, and it helps a lot when you can’t work the way you used to.

The complex of nine buildings looks like it isn’t taken care of but has been individualized on a family by family basis. Christmas lights and picket fences, and homey touches give each four-plex character, as does the way it’s laid out. The nine buildings sprawl on almost three acres lot in two clusters separated by an access road. The cluster of five buildings are laid out in a bendy U-shape and the other four are laid out the long way to form an X. There’s big areas of green between them, free-standing four-plexes in a park setting. It gives the side-by-side, two-story apartments the feeling of a comfortable distance from the neighbors – enough so that nearly all of the residents haven’t put up fences.

“You can’t see into your neighbors’ houses and they can’t see into ours,” Jose, the former property manager, say. The Ulric Street complex is back to back with the Linda Vista Community Park, adding more green.

The complex was built during World War II for aircraft workers.

According to the lender website: “Many of the homes in Linda Vista were built in 1940-41 as part of a government project to house aircraft workers for the war effort. A construction project that began in October 1940 resulted in 3,000 houses being built within 200 days.”

Usually when such a complex is torn down for a larger affordable housing project, the people who lived on the site before construction have to get in line with all the other applicants, as required by the San Diego Housing Commission. But this time – and for only the second time in the city – the current residents who qualify for the low-rent apartments have dibs on them. (The first was in Rancho Penasquitos where developers of a market rate project agreed to build additional affordable housing.

“We petitioned the housing commission to allow people to return to the housing if they are eligible,” says Community HousingWorks Project Manager Sylvia Martinez. “I hope it sets a great precedent.”

Martinez regularly attends the Linda Vista Planning Group to share what the developer is thinking about and to hear community feedback. The planning group, led by Noli Zosa, has supported the project from the beginning, but with concerns about what will happen to current residents. In August, Martinez told the group that city housing commission rules blocked giving the current residents priority. But she went back to the housing commission and it looks like the poorer residents will be able to come back once construction ends.

Housingworks’ plans for the 2.9-acre property remain in flux. While the group is seeking zoning that will allow up to 188 apartments, the current thinking is around 108 units. The property is near a bus line, which means it gets more apartments and it’s affordable, which means parking requirements are relaxed.

Martinez says that affordable housing projects tell apartment applicants that they can have a limited number of cars and that management will be checking.

“We find people looking at North Park from El Cajon or Chula Vista wouldn’t think of getting rid of their cars,” Martinez says. “We keep track of cars our residents have – market-rate developers don’t have to.”

Several residents, including LilliBelle and Jimmy, and the former property manager, say they still feel like they don’t know what will happen next.

They praised their previous landlord, who’d set their rent $560 a month many years earlier, and told Jimmy to spend the rest of your money on something for himself, he says. They came from the Philippines and did what work came for them; and now Jimmy is on social security while Lillibelle keeps working

They’ve gone to a couple of planning group meetings, and they’re worried about what will happen. As they understand it, community housing works will help them find a place to live and help them move. But the plan they keep hearing about changes with each discussion.

“First they say 180 apartments, then they say 120, now we hear 105,” Jimmy says. “Neighbors say they will tear down those buildings first and we can stay in ours until that building is finished. But that doesn’t sound right.”

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

U.S. Kids Chamber of Commerce gets mixed response in Encinitas

You pay to recycle and where does the money go?
Next Article

Cavalier Mobile Home owners vs. the rest of the neighborhood

Barbara Villasenor convinced to re-erect fire lane gate
Comments
3
This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.
Dec. 18, 2018

$8.3 million is $230,555 per unit. Considering taxes, maintenance and return on investment it takes a lot of rent per unit to recoup the investment. Of course the rent will go up.

Dec. 22, 2018

Clarification: It was the Linda Vista Planning group that initiated the request to the San Diego Housing Commission, asking for the existing residents to move to the top of the new applicant list, as long as they qualify for affordable housing. The commission not only said yes, but changed its policy and created a new position, the preservation coordinator, to work with residents displaced from existing inexpensive homes by affordable housing.

Feb. 18, 2019

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close