Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Hosp's loss, Carlsbad's gain

A eucalyptus forest with scenic views of Buena Vista Lagoon.

Nearing the top of the trail
Nearing the top of the trail
Tot lot and picnic area

The many eucalyptus trees (Eucalyptus globulus) growing in this part of Carlsbad were originally planted by F.W. Hosp, an Oceanside nurseryman, who hoped to use the wood for railroad ties, bridges, and trestles. Hosp and his investors formed the Hosp Eucalyptus Corporation in 1907, and ultimately planted 45 of the 219 acres they owned with 1082 trees per acre. Unfortunately, as they began to harvest trees, they discovered that immature blue gum wood was not suitable for their purposes. The wood was too hard to drive railroad spikes into, and the wood tended to twist and warp as it dried.

Over the years, much of the land controlled by the Hosp Eucalyptus Corporation was sold for development. More recently, Carlsbad acquired the remaining 55 acres of the Grove to be used as City parkland and open space. These lands are now maintained largely through the efforts of dedicated volunteers.

Nearing the top of the trail

The genus Eucalyptus contains over 700 species, almost all exclusively Australian natives, and an estimated 200 of these have been transplanted from their native home in Australia to California. Some of these species are not only beautiful but produce valuable products, including oils and wood. Several species of eucalyptus are drought tolerant and have become naturalized, both here and in locations throughout California.

However, eucalyptus plantations can and do cause significant problems. Most native California animals cannot eat eucalyptus. The trees are constantly dropping leaves, branches, seed pods and bark. The accumulated litter suppresses native vegetation, leaving less food for native animals. Dense eucalyptus stands with their accumulated litter are also fire prone, and the severity of several California wildfires, such as the 1991 Oakland hills fire that destroyed 2800 homes and killed 25 people, has been attributed to the abundance of eucalyptus in the forests on those hills.

The Grove trails form a network, so it is difficult to create a continuous loop route. To complete a 3-mile walk, take the 1.5 mile West Grove trails, then cross Monroe Street and hike several of the East Hosp Grove trails. From the main entrance off Jefferson Street, begin your hike on the trail going west from the parking lot. As it rises up the hillside, it will give you satisfying views of the Buena Vista Lagoon. After hiking less than 0.1 mile, the trail makes a hairpin turn and continues climbing up the slope for even better lagoon vistas. Note the large logs that remain on the slopes lining some parts of the trail, apparent remnants of logging activity that occurred here at some point in the past.

After reaching a high point, the trail turns sharply south and becomes parallel with Monroe Street. Note the near absence of typical native California shrubs. Most likely, the eucalyptus trees with their deep roots and accumulated litter suppressed the growth and reproduction of coastal sage scrub or maritime chaparral species that originally grew here. Occasionally you will come to clusters of large native lemonadeberry bushes, but even these clusters are sparsely scattered amongst the trees.

After hiking about 0.5 mile, the trail begins to rise again. Shortly you will come to a fork. Take the right fork, which will lead you to the top of the ridge, with a trailhead on Crest Street. Unusual non-native exotics found here include succulents such as jade plant and pig’s ear.

After reaching Crest Street, turn around and go back the way you came, but upon nearing Monroe Street, find the lower trail going north and follow it back to the Monroe and Marron Street intersection. Here you can safely cross Monroe to the East Hosp Grove Trails.

From the Rotary picnic and parking area in the East Grove, find the main trail going east, up the slope. On reaching the top, you will find trails that continue east across a gently sloping plateau. Eventually, the main trail will take you to a trailhead off Hosp Way, another entrance to the Grove. From here, find a trail heading west and take it. Because of the openness of the forest and the scarcity of an understory, it is relatively easy to find trails that interest you and take them back to the Monroe-Marron intersection. Crossing the intersection, you will find a trail continuing west to the main entrance and your vehicle.

Directions: (Carlsbad) From I-5, take exit 51A Los Flores Drive. Turn left on Los Flores, cross back over the freeway, and shortly come to the intersection of Los Flores and Jefferson St. Make a right turn on Jefferson and follow it 0.6 mile to the main Hosp Grove entrance and parking area. Here you will find picnic tables and a children’s play area, in addition to the trailhead for the West Grove hiking trails. There is also a porta-potty, the only facility in the park.

Hiking length: 3 miles, loop. Allow 1.5 hours.

Difficulty: Moderately easy with an elevation gain/loss of 800 feet. Hikers, leashed dogs, and bicyclists are allowed on the trails.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

"We had to get canning quickly"

In response to covid, these small brewers now offer beer in cans for the first time
Next Article

Nathan Fletcher's viral propaganda push

County supervisor to pack staff with video maker, social media star
Nearing the top of the trail
Nearing the top of the trail
Tot lot and picnic area

The many eucalyptus trees (Eucalyptus globulus) growing in this part of Carlsbad were originally planted by F.W. Hosp, an Oceanside nurseryman, who hoped to use the wood for railroad ties, bridges, and trestles. Hosp and his investors formed the Hosp Eucalyptus Corporation in 1907, and ultimately planted 45 of the 219 acres they owned with 1082 trees per acre. Unfortunately, as they began to harvest trees, they discovered that immature blue gum wood was not suitable for their purposes. The wood was too hard to drive railroad spikes into, and the wood tended to twist and warp as it dried.

Over the years, much of the land controlled by the Hosp Eucalyptus Corporation was sold for development. More recently, Carlsbad acquired the remaining 55 acres of the Grove to be used as City parkland and open space. These lands are now maintained largely through the efforts of dedicated volunteers.

Nearing the top of the trail

The genus Eucalyptus contains over 700 species, almost all exclusively Australian natives, and an estimated 200 of these have been transplanted from their native home in Australia to California. Some of these species are not only beautiful but produce valuable products, including oils and wood. Several species of eucalyptus are drought tolerant and have become naturalized, both here and in locations throughout California.

However, eucalyptus plantations can and do cause significant problems. Most native California animals cannot eat eucalyptus. The trees are constantly dropping leaves, branches, seed pods and bark. The accumulated litter suppresses native vegetation, leaving less food for native animals. Dense eucalyptus stands with their accumulated litter are also fire prone, and the severity of several California wildfires, such as the 1991 Oakland hills fire that destroyed 2800 homes and killed 25 people, has been attributed to the abundance of eucalyptus in the forests on those hills.

The Grove trails form a network, so it is difficult to create a continuous loop route. To complete a 3-mile walk, take the 1.5 mile West Grove trails, then cross Monroe Street and hike several of the East Hosp Grove trails. From the main entrance off Jefferson Street, begin your hike on the trail going west from the parking lot. As it rises up the hillside, it will give you satisfying views of the Buena Vista Lagoon. After hiking less than 0.1 mile, the trail makes a hairpin turn and continues climbing up the slope for even better lagoon vistas. Note the large logs that remain on the slopes lining some parts of the trail, apparent remnants of logging activity that occurred here at some point in the past.

After reaching a high point, the trail turns sharply south and becomes parallel with Monroe Street. Note the near absence of typical native California shrubs. Most likely, the eucalyptus trees with their deep roots and accumulated litter suppressed the growth and reproduction of coastal sage scrub or maritime chaparral species that originally grew here. Occasionally you will come to clusters of large native lemonadeberry bushes, but even these clusters are sparsely scattered amongst the trees.

After hiking about 0.5 mile, the trail begins to rise again. Shortly you will come to a fork. Take the right fork, which will lead you to the top of the ridge, with a trailhead on Crest Street. Unusual non-native exotics found here include succulents such as jade plant and pig’s ear.

After reaching Crest Street, turn around and go back the way you came, but upon nearing Monroe Street, find the lower trail going north and follow it back to the Monroe and Marron Street intersection. Here you can safely cross Monroe to the East Hosp Grove Trails.

From the Rotary picnic and parking area in the East Grove, find the main trail going east, up the slope. On reaching the top, you will find trails that continue east across a gently sloping plateau. Eventually, the main trail will take you to a trailhead off Hosp Way, another entrance to the Grove. From here, find a trail heading west and take it. Because of the openness of the forest and the scarcity of an understory, it is relatively easy to find trails that interest you and take them back to the Monroe-Marron intersection. Crossing the intersection, you will find a trail continuing west to the main entrance and your vehicle.

Directions: (Carlsbad) From I-5, take exit 51A Los Flores Drive. Turn left on Los Flores, cross back over the freeway, and shortly come to the intersection of Los Flores and Jefferson St. Make a right turn on Jefferson and follow it 0.6 mile to the main Hosp Grove entrance and parking area. Here you will find picnic tables and a children’s play area, in addition to the trailhead for the West Grove hiking trails. There is also a porta-potty, the only facility in the park.

Hiking length: 3 miles, loop. Allow 1.5 hours.

Difficulty: Moderately easy with an elevation gain/loss of 800 feet. Hikers, leashed dogs, and bicyclists are allowed on the trails.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Dress up with cork wedges from Aerosoles and a necklace from Pier 1

“For three months, I existed only on yoga pants and sweatpants.”
Next Article

How Baja's new Prohibition is working

Cross-border beer runs
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close