Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Community Choice Energy programs gaining popularity

Consumers tired of utilities’ carelessness and greed

Harris Fire, October 2007 - Image by Andrea Booher
Harris Fire, October 2007

For a decade and a half, California’s investor-owned utilities — Sempra Energy, Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E), and Edison International — have controlled their purported regulator, the California Public Utilities Commission. Legally, it should be the other way around: the regulator should regulate the big utilities. However, since 2002 when Michael Peevey, a former president of Edison, was named head of the commission, its overriding emphasis toward the publicly traded utilities has been boosting profits and stock prices at the expense of customers.

Peevey left under a cloud of scandal on the first day of 2015, but his successor has been no better.

Remains of burned home in Santa Rosa

During this period, the state’s local nonprofit government-run utilities — municipal districts, city departments, irrigation districts, and rural cooperatives, which are not regulated by the public utilities commission — have by and large done better. The three stockholder-owned utilities generally have the highest rates in the nation, while the government-run utilities sometimes charge customers around half of what Sempra, Edison, and PG&E charge. And the government-run utilities often provide superior service.

Needless to say, the investor-owned utilities, with their sky-high rates, have fat profits. That’s because “they make money based on how much they spend on investment,” says San Diego lawyer Maria Severson. Whenever utilities spend a bundle, the commission permits them to make money that bolsters profits. So, San Diego Gas & Electric is rewarded on the bottom line for building gas-fired plants when the world is moving toward wind-, solar-, hydro-, and geothermal-based energy.

Aftermath of 2010 San Bruno pipeline explosion

Clearly, the momentum is headed toward clean energy, says Severson. The Trump administration’s plan to massage the coal, oil, and gas industries by wiping out the 2015 Clean Power Plan will ultimately fail, and even Wall Street understands that. “We don’t expect [Trump’s coal, oil, and gas initiative] to have any impact on the utilities sector,” says analyst Andrew Bischof of Morningstar. Carbon emissions will continue to fall. “The move to abandon the Clean Power Plan could even embolden states to strengthen renewable energy standards.”

Cities are championing Community Choice Energy programs (also called Community Choice Aggregation plans), which allow public agencies to purchase electricity on behalf of customers while permitting investor-owned utilities to be responsible for delivering power, maintaining the grid, and handling services. Solana Beach intends to launch such a program next year, and Encinitas, Del Mar, Carlsbad, and San Diego have groups pushing the concept.

The Bay Area has several community choice programs: East Bay Community Energy, Marin Clean Energy, CleanPowerSF, Peninsula Clean Energy, and Silicon Valley Clean Energy. “They have survived whatever obstacles Pacific Gas and Electric has put in their way,” says Mindy Spatt, communications director at the Bay Area’s Utility Reform Network, who agrees with Severson that “there is no question we are moving in the direction of clean power.”

Through a community-choice program, Los Angeles County is preparing to take over electricity procurement in a large swath of territory now served by Edison. When this is completed, backers say Los Angeles Community Choice Energy will have the largest customer base in the movement.

But San Diego’s Sempra Energy is still fighting. It has recruited pro-business groups, such as the San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce, the San Diego County Taxpayers Association, and the Downtown San Diego Partnership to put up roadblocks to the Community Choice Energy plans, according to the Union-Tribune. This raises a poignant question: Why should business groups fight the community-choice movement if it can lead to lower electricity rates for companies, too?

Summing up the mentality of the utility industry and its lackeys, Severson observes, “Computers used to be large mainframes; now everybody has a more powerful computer that they can put in their pockets. The energy industry should be no different.”

But don’t count on it. Profits, not progress, are paramount among utilities. Sempra Energy boasts that shareholder return from 2011 to 2016 was a swashbuckling 112 percent — almost double the gain of similar utilities. “Our strategic objective is to grow our earnings per share and dividend over the next five years at roughly double the rate of the utility industry,” exults Debra Reed, chief executive, in a message to Sempra shareholders.

But Sempra’s message to ratepayers? Screw you! On October 6, San Diego Gas & Electric told its patsy, the California Public Utilities Commission, that it wants an 11 percent increase in 2019, followed by further fat increases through 2022.

SDG&E also wants to settle an old score. Although turned down once, SDG&E wants ratepayers to pick up the tab for uninsured costs of the 2007 fires. In reports on those devastating fires, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire), along with a division of the state public utilities commission, concluded that two fires had been started by San Diego Gas & Electric power lines that the company had not maintained safely; a third fire was blamed jointly on SDG&E and Cox Communications. A utility commissioner snuck in a phrase sticking ratepayers with the cost, but local activists caught the ruse, and the embarrassed commission had to thumb it down. But as commission watchers predicted, the company is trying again to stick the bill to ratepayers. At public meetings, consumers have expressed outrage, and the commission keeps putting off a vote on the staggering proposed ratepayer rape — $379 million — until the company thinks it has the public in its pocket.

Since those 2007 fires, the state’s three investor-owned utilities have punched ratepayers in the nose several times. Southern California Gas, a unit of Sempra, stumblingly discommoded customers during its Aliso Canyon gas leak. Edison, majority owner of the San Onofre nuclear plant, is trying to stick consumers with 70 percent of the $4.7 billion cost of decommissioning the facility, after meeting secretly and illegally with commission officials in the investigation phase. Pacific Gas and Electric brass got off without any penalties after the company’s negligence in the deadly 2010 San Bruno explosion; a federal audit concluded that Pacific Gas had taken advantage of a lax public utilities commission.

Now, however, the commission has asked Pacific Gas and Electric to preserve any evidence in case the company’s negligence played a role in the recent Northern California wildfires. So maybe we will see some headway.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Audit hits lack of athletic admissions integrity at UC San Diego

"The board member used me to get his family friend's kid in UCSD"
Harris Fire, October 2007 - Image by Andrea Booher
Harris Fire, October 2007

For a decade and a half, California’s investor-owned utilities — Sempra Energy, Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E), and Edison International — have controlled their purported regulator, the California Public Utilities Commission. Legally, it should be the other way around: the regulator should regulate the big utilities. However, since 2002 when Michael Peevey, a former president of Edison, was named head of the commission, its overriding emphasis toward the publicly traded utilities has been boosting profits and stock prices at the expense of customers.

Peevey left under a cloud of scandal on the first day of 2015, but his successor has been no better.

Remains of burned home in Santa Rosa

During this period, the state’s local nonprofit government-run utilities — municipal districts, city departments, irrigation districts, and rural cooperatives, which are not regulated by the public utilities commission — have by and large done better. The three stockholder-owned utilities generally have the highest rates in the nation, while the government-run utilities sometimes charge customers around half of what Sempra, Edison, and PG&E charge. And the government-run utilities often provide superior service.

Needless to say, the investor-owned utilities, with their sky-high rates, have fat profits. That’s because “they make money based on how much they spend on investment,” says San Diego lawyer Maria Severson. Whenever utilities spend a bundle, the commission permits them to make money that bolsters profits. So, San Diego Gas & Electric is rewarded on the bottom line for building gas-fired plants when the world is moving toward wind-, solar-, hydro-, and geothermal-based energy.

Aftermath of 2010 San Bruno pipeline explosion

Clearly, the momentum is headed toward clean energy, says Severson. The Trump administration’s plan to massage the coal, oil, and gas industries by wiping out the 2015 Clean Power Plan will ultimately fail, and even Wall Street understands that. “We don’t expect [Trump’s coal, oil, and gas initiative] to have any impact on the utilities sector,” says analyst Andrew Bischof of Morningstar. Carbon emissions will continue to fall. “The move to abandon the Clean Power Plan could even embolden states to strengthen renewable energy standards.”

Cities are championing Community Choice Energy programs (also called Community Choice Aggregation plans), which allow public agencies to purchase electricity on behalf of customers while permitting investor-owned utilities to be responsible for delivering power, maintaining the grid, and handling services. Solana Beach intends to launch such a program next year, and Encinitas, Del Mar, Carlsbad, and San Diego have groups pushing the concept.

The Bay Area has several community choice programs: East Bay Community Energy, Marin Clean Energy, CleanPowerSF, Peninsula Clean Energy, and Silicon Valley Clean Energy. “They have survived whatever obstacles Pacific Gas and Electric has put in their way,” says Mindy Spatt, communications director at the Bay Area’s Utility Reform Network, who agrees with Severson that “there is no question we are moving in the direction of clean power.”

Through a community-choice program, Los Angeles County is preparing to take over electricity procurement in a large swath of territory now served by Edison. When this is completed, backers say Los Angeles Community Choice Energy will have the largest customer base in the movement.

But San Diego’s Sempra Energy is still fighting. It has recruited pro-business groups, such as the San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce, the San Diego County Taxpayers Association, and the Downtown San Diego Partnership to put up roadblocks to the Community Choice Energy plans, according to the Union-Tribune. This raises a poignant question: Why should business groups fight the community-choice movement if it can lead to lower electricity rates for companies, too?

Summing up the mentality of the utility industry and its lackeys, Severson observes, “Computers used to be large mainframes; now everybody has a more powerful computer that they can put in their pockets. The energy industry should be no different.”

But don’t count on it. Profits, not progress, are paramount among utilities. Sempra Energy boasts that shareholder return from 2011 to 2016 was a swashbuckling 112 percent — almost double the gain of similar utilities. “Our strategic objective is to grow our earnings per share and dividend over the next five years at roughly double the rate of the utility industry,” exults Debra Reed, chief executive, in a message to Sempra shareholders.

But Sempra’s message to ratepayers? Screw you! On October 6, San Diego Gas & Electric told its patsy, the California Public Utilities Commission, that it wants an 11 percent increase in 2019, followed by further fat increases through 2022.

SDG&E also wants to settle an old score. Although turned down once, SDG&E wants ratepayers to pick up the tab for uninsured costs of the 2007 fires. In reports on those devastating fires, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire), along with a division of the state public utilities commission, concluded that two fires had been started by San Diego Gas & Electric power lines that the company had not maintained safely; a third fire was blamed jointly on SDG&E and Cox Communications. A utility commissioner snuck in a phrase sticking ratepayers with the cost, but local activists caught the ruse, and the embarrassed commission had to thumb it down. But as commission watchers predicted, the company is trying again to stick the bill to ratepayers. At public meetings, consumers have expressed outrage, and the commission keeps putting off a vote on the staggering proposed ratepayer rape — $379 million — until the company thinks it has the public in its pocket.

Since those 2007 fires, the state’s three investor-owned utilities have punched ratepayers in the nose several times. Southern California Gas, a unit of Sempra, stumblingly discommoded customers during its Aliso Canyon gas leak. Edison, majority owner of the San Onofre nuclear plant, is trying to stick consumers with 70 percent of the $4.7 billion cost of decommissioning the facility, after meeting secretly and illegally with commission officials in the investigation phase. Pacific Gas and Electric brass got off without any penalties after the company’s negligence in the deadly 2010 San Bruno explosion; a federal audit concluded that Pacific Gas had taken advantage of a lax public utilities commission.

Now, however, the commission has asked Pacific Gas and Electric to preserve any evidence in case the company’s negligence played a role in the recent Northern California wildfires. So maybe we will see some headway.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Unexpendable Rambo

The first and fourth foray
Next Article

Who stole your iPod, FM94's Mike Esparza, Hell's Angels, our Russian yacht, Seaworld sharks, why they leave San Diego

San Diego Reader stories with most clicks
Comments
9

Certain necessary services are so important that they must not be left in the hands of profit seeking corporations and wealthy lobbyists. They must be managed by the citizens via responsible elected officials. These include:

Transportation- roads, bridges, waterways, airspace, and rules for their use.

Water- source management, transportation, processing, and wastewater mgmt.

Energy- gas, electric, production, transportation, safety rules, planning

Communication- infrastructure, licensing providers, privacy protection…

Schools- well we got one thing right, except for the new Education Secretary

Elections- SD County has done pretty well

Prisons- private systems have been criminally negligent.

Police- Sworn officers- keep them on the street. OK civilians for office work.

Military- Much of what we instigate overseas is done by anonymous contractors.

Other- what did I miss?

Nov. 8, 2017

swell: If we eliminated mercenaries and other soldiers of fortune, what would happen to Erik Prince, Betsy DeVos's brother? Would the poor dear be unemployed? Best, Don Bauder

Nov. 8, 2017

May they both burn in the Bad Place!

Nov. 8, 2017

swell: Since they both worship firearms, they believe they can fight off the devils. Best, Don Bauder

Nov. 8, 2017

Mike Murphy: You raise a question that I can't answer. Maybe somebody on this blog knows the information. Best, Don Bauder

Nov. 8, 2017

Ratepayer owned utilities (Imperial Irrigation District) rates are 30% - 50% less than investor owned utilities. SDG&E rates are among the highest in the nation. Not much will change as long as they are in bed with the corrupt CPUC. In San Diego everything is more expensive and keeps going up except wages.

Nov. 9, 2017

AlexClarke: You are correct. First, some background: SDG&E used to report its rates to the Jacksonville. Florida utility, which kept records on many utilities' rates. I reported in the Reader that, over the years, SDG&E had the highest rates in the country, although in some instances its rates were only second or third highest. So SDG&E stopped reporting to Jacksonville -- a typical dodge for this company.

However, there are other ways to figure this. Richard Rider of San Diego calculated that SDG&E's rates were highest in the country.

You are correct that not much will change as long as the investor-owned utilities are not only in bed with, but CONTROL the corrupt CPUC. Best, Don Bauder

Nov. 9, 2017

Jim Dwight: Good question.First we have to get rid of the laws that protect the CPUC and immunize it from public wrath. Best, Don Bauder

Nov. 10, 2017

Melanie Demont: Because the top officers of an investor-owned company can be thrown out when profits weaken, those companies take safety chances. The 2007 fires in San Diego County were a good example. The utility was negligent because Sempra was fixated on its bottom line and stock price. Best, Don Bauder

Nov. 10, 2017

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close