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Arrested trying to withdraw inheritance money from Pt. Loma Wells Fargo

19-year-old black man sues San Diego Police

Officers transported Hayward to jail. He was released the following day on bail.
Officers transported Hayward to jail. He was released the following day on bail.

Mark Hayward entered a Wells Fargo branch in Point Loma on August 5, 2016 and requested to withdraw $20,000 from his bank account he had opened ten days prior, reads an April 25 lawsuit Hayward filed in federal court. The money was from an inheritance he had received, says his attorney.

He handed the teller his identification. The teller, however, refused to proceed with the transaction on account that Hayward's photo identification did not appear to match his appearance. Instead of using different verification methods, the teller phoned the San Diego Police Department to alert officers to a possible forgery.

Officers arrived at the branch and questioned Hayward. Hayward cooperated with police and answered all of their questions. Still unconvinced police arrested the 19-year-old on suspicion of forgery and detained his fiancee, Robin Rose, who was also present at the bank. Officers transported Hayward to jail. He was released the following day on bail.

The district attorney's Office opted not to file any charges.

That same day Robin Rose's brother, Jesse and his wife Lorraine Rose, entered a Wells Fargo branch on B Street in downtown San Diego. The couple also looked to withdraw $20,000 from their account. The teller refused and notified law enforcement. Police detained the couple for four hours but later released Rose and his wife.

The lawsuit accuses the San Diego Police Department of civil rights violations, racial discrimination, and assault and battery.

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Officers transported Hayward to jail. He was released the following day on bail.
Officers transported Hayward to jail. He was released the following day on bail.

Mark Hayward entered a Wells Fargo branch in Point Loma on August 5, 2016 and requested to withdraw $20,000 from his bank account he had opened ten days prior, reads an April 25 lawsuit Hayward filed in federal court. The money was from an inheritance he had received, says his attorney.

He handed the teller his identification. The teller, however, refused to proceed with the transaction on account that Hayward's photo identification did not appear to match his appearance. Instead of using different verification methods, the teller phoned the San Diego Police Department to alert officers to a possible forgery.

Officers arrived at the branch and questioned Hayward. Hayward cooperated with police and answered all of their questions. Still unconvinced police arrested the 19-year-old on suspicion of forgery and detained his fiancee, Robin Rose, who was also present at the bank. Officers transported Hayward to jail. He was released the following day on bail.

The district attorney's Office opted not to file any charges.

That same day Robin Rose's brother, Jesse and his wife Lorraine Rose, entered a Wells Fargo branch on B Street in downtown San Diego. The couple also looked to withdraw $20,000 from their account. The teller refused and notified law enforcement. Police detained the couple for four hours but later released Rose and his wife.

The lawsuit accuses the San Diego Police Department of civil rights violations, racial discrimination, and assault and battery.

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Comments
6

Based on the information presented it boggles the mind that any customer would be put in such a position for simply wishing to withdraw THEIR OWN FREAKING MONEY!!!!!!

May 5, 2017

Another good reason to "bank" with a credit union. At most credit unions, the customer is appreciated, and treated well.

May 5, 2017

It seems that it is increasingly hard to withdraw your own money from a bank. I closed an account recently (bank to remain nameless) and they asked me several none-of-their-business questions about what I was going to do with the money and tried to hard sell me several of their financial products. Finally I was able to walk out of the bank with my money.

May 6, 2017

One tiny point here is the use of the term "withdraw." I"m assuming that in this case it refers to wanting to withdraw the funds in cash. That's a lot of folding money, folks. And once he walked out the door with it, it was gone. Anything that made the transaction bogus would cost the bank the entire amount.

If, on the other hand, the request was for a check payable to him or to a third party, the picture changes. When there's no cash involved, there is no need for a report of a cash transaction exceeding $10,000, and little likelihood that the customer would be robbed in, say, the bank's parking lot. Using large amounts of cash for anything nowadays attracts plenty of negative attention. There's nothing illegal about it, but it makes some people very antsy. And that is what seems to have happened here.

May 7, 2017

No, what really happened here is that the bank was the corrupt Wells Fargo. That bank should have been shut down by the Feds, and the CEO and others should be facing criminal charges for all those fake accounts they opened.

May 7, 2017

One time back in the 1980's, I needed $20,000 cash for business purposes. The bank was Grossmont Bank where my business was a customer. They told me they had to order the cash. I needed it that day. They sent me to a bank downtown (I don't remember the name). But I drove into a basement garages and went through a security door, then through another door into a room with a couple of chairs and a very thick glass window where the "teller" was. He gave me four packets wrapped with a printed label that said $5,000.

Today, my personal account are with a credit union. They don't keep much cash on hand. I've been told many banks don't keep more than $10,000 except for extra money ordered on paydays.

Maybe there was a misunderstanding and the bank did not have the cash to give out?

Every business these days tries to keep the cash on hand low and use "just in time" techniques to move cash in and out to keep the optimum amount to do business and deter robberies.

May 7, 2017

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