An opium-smoking madame (Julie Christie) propositions a small-time gambler (Warren Beatty) in McCabe and Mrs. Miller.
  • An opium-smoking madame (Julie Christie) propositions a small-time gambler (Warren Beatty) in McCabe and Mrs. Miller.
  • Story alerts
  • Letter to Editor
  • Pin it

For those whose knowledge of Warren Beatty doesn’t extend much beyond last week’s unparalleled round of egg on Oscar’s face, it’s time to put in an appearance at Landmark’s Ken Cinema for their latest installment of Week of Film Classics.

Landmark Ken

4061 Adams Avenue, Kensington

Starting this Friday and running through Thursday, March 16, the Ken dusts off seven tried and true titles for their early spring drop of vintage cinema. Jim Henson’s Labyrinth opens the week, to which I say, “Enough!” Give the puppet show a rest. Next time try dazzling Bowie fans with a presentation of Julien Temple’s seldom revived (and infinitely superior) Absolute Beginners.

Next up, Hayao Miyazaki’s Princess Mononoke and Franco Zeffirelli’s Romeo and Juliet. That takes us through Monday. Now that the weekend is over and the kids are back in school, it’s time to get down to basics: Billy Wilder’s Double Indemnity, Akira Kurosawa’s Seven Samurai, and a 25th Anniversary restoration of Quentin Tarantino’s Reservoir Dogs.

“See it on the big screen!” It’s a term that should apply to all film, but none moreso than Robert Altman’s rimy whorehouse western McCabe and Mrs. Miller, starring Warren Beatty as tatty gambler John McCabe and Julie Christie as his opium-scented partner in prostitution.

No matter if your home screen is 3K, 4K, or OK DOKE, the textured veneer of cinematographer Vilmos Zsigmond’s exquisitely languorous frames gets lost on TV every time. On a television viewing, the final chase through the wintry woods is barely comprehensible; it looks like someone kicked the cord and the satellite reception went to snow. Trust me: this one is worth leaving the house for.

You’ll have four chances to see McCabe when it screens on March 16. Visit LandmarkTheatres.com for dates and times.

  • Story alerts
  • Letter to Editor
  • Pin it

Comments

TacomaTundra March 8, 2017 @ 2:51 p.m.

Comic Book Guy voice: Worst "Week of Film Classics" lineup ever.

1

SalULloyd March 14, 2017 @ 1:33 p.m.

You aren't kidding! Since when in PRINCESS MONONOKE a blanking classic??? And DOGS isn't a classic either! Cult movie, yes, NOT a classic.

0

TacomaTundra March 8, 2017 @ 2:52 p.m.

I guess Seven Samurai might be alright though....

1

Scott Marks March 9, 2017 @ 2:30 p.m.

And "McCabe" is a fine film. At least there's no "Rocky Horror" or Tommy Wiseau crapola stinking things up.

1

TacomaTundra March 9, 2017 @ 3:23 p.m.

All Im saying is that, they could have chosen much better films.

1

monaghan March 8, 2017 @ 7:39 p.m.

"McCabe and Mrs. Miller" and "Romeo and Juliet" are both gorgeous to look at and insanely romantic. I have always been too scared to go see "Reservoir Dogs." "Seven Samurai" is required viewing, but not more than once, in my opinion.

1

Scott Marks March 9, 2017 @ 2:29 p.m.

I'm with you. I got SS the first time.

1

SalULloyd March 14, 2017 @ 1:36 p.m.

The late great Vilmos Zsigmond (Deliverance) shot MCCABE.

0

dwbat March 14, 2017 @ 3:27 p.m.

Pasqualino De Santis was cinematographer on Romeo and Juliet. He also shot Death in Venice and The Damned (two of my faves).

0

Sign in to comment

Get $5 off any Reader event

Sign up for our email list to get your promo code

Close