Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

San Diegans philosophize about loss of Payless

No more at Stonecrest Plaza, Southland Plaza, Main Street Village, Clairemont Town Square, North County Square, Broadway Plaza, and Encinitas Ranch Town Center

Payless, Murphy Canyon. “Their low prices and BOGO kept me coming back."
Payless, Murphy Canyon. “Their low prices and BOGO kept me coming back."

“They are closing it because it’s bankrupt from what I heard,” said Kristina Aquino as she barely left Payless ShoeSource at 3460 Murphy Canyon Road location in Stonecrest Plaza.

Aquino and Smith. Aquino: "I used to come here often with my mom.”

Aquino and her friend Anthony Smith, bought a pair of sneakers from the liquidation sale at around noon on July 6.

“When I was younger (in 2004) I used to come here often with my mom,” said Aquino, “[but] because of all of the other places that are opening, you can get the same thing for cheaper prices.”

Payless at Southland Plaza in South San Diego

Smith agreed and said “There you go, there’s more options [to buy discount shoes] now.”

“I mean you can go to Ross, TJ Maxx, and the Nike factory,” she said, “… and with my military discount – it would’ve [probably] been cheaper.”

Alex, the sales rep inside the store, said he couldn’t comment on any details of the closings of many of the 4,400 Payless shoe stores worldwide. He did, although, say his store will be closing its doors on July 10. He added that he and his co-workers will be relocating to a different shoe store. Prices in this store were discounted at 20-40 percent off, and the sales fixtures were up for grabs.

“It’s no longer the discount shoe store [and] the prices are up there,” Khristin said, “and I only buy when the shoes are on sale or if I’m desperate.” She works in the catering industry and picked up a pair of SafeTStep ($39) non-slip work shoes and “fun ‘lil” sandals. She buys her shoes at Wal-Mart, which is two stores down, but this day she was lured by the bright window display.

“Store closing, everything on sale, and everything must go” signs were plastered on all of the windows.

“I grew up coming to Payless (since the 1970s-1980s) [because] it was the functional discount store and it was practical,” Khristin said, “[but] I mean the prices have gone up, and the quality isn’t there.”

She said that she goes to “Kohls, Burlington, Ross, and Marshalls for the better quality at a discount.”

Michael is another old-school customer who’s been coming here since the 1980s. He was “diggin'” on the Kangaroos for $29.99 (original retail was $49.99) in the store. “Man [I think] that’s how much they were back then, I’m gonna call my mom and ask,” he said.

Michael blames some of the Payless stores’ demise on the internet. “Amazon and eBay have sellers killing the market,” he said, “they got companies selling direct from China (where most of the shoes are manufactured), closeout types who buy in bulk for pennies on the dollar, and let’s not forget the downtown Los Angeles garment district vendors, who are next down on the chain (of the wholesale market). Combine low prices with low overhead, savvy [computer] programs to handle invoices, inventory, and marketing, and then free shipping — it’s gonna be hard to compete.”

“Champion shoes (as low as $19) from Payless are the best,” said Luisa, a City College student, “I have three pairs [and] all in different colors.”

“I’ve been shopping there for at least nine years,” said Hoppe, a custom jewelry designer, “their low prices and BOGO kept me coming back, and just like any other higher-end brand; you have to weed through and find stylish, up-to-date fashionable pieces you like.”

Patsy, a fashionista/collector, has been scooping up the "Christian Siriano runway stuff" at the stores. "[The] prices here are cheap; when I was at the Chula [Vista] store, I saw a bunch of sandals for $10," she said, "now that's low for unused shoes [that are] mint-in-box." She wishes that the Siriano runway-line ($39-$49) will sell for that cheap one day.

Besides the Stonecrest Plaza closure, the Payless ShoeSource website has listed six other San Diego (and vicinity) stores that will be closing: Southland Plaza (South San Diego), Main Street Village (El Cajon), Clairemont Town Square, North County Square (Vista), Broadway Plaza (Chula Vista), and Encinitas Ranch Town Center.

On April 4, Payless ShoeSource (“Payless,” “the Company”) posted a press release which reads in part “that it has filed a voluntary petition for reorganization pursuant to Chapter 11 of the U.S. Federal Bankruptcy Code to facilitate the financial and operational restructuring necessary to strengthen its balance sheet and position the Company for long-term success.”

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Glass partitions and spirit bottles at El Agave

Restaurant dining is back, in a limited fashion
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Payless, Murphy Canyon. “Their low prices and BOGO kept me coming back."
Payless, Murphy Canyon. “Their low prices and BOGO kept me coming back."

“They are closing it because it’s bankrupt from what I heard,” said Kristina Aquino as she barely left Payless ShoeSource at 3460 Murphy Canyon Road location in Stonecrest Plaza.

Aquino and Smith. Aquino: "I used to come here often with my mom.”

Aquino and her friend Anthony Smith, bought a pair of sneakers from the liquidation sale at around noon on July 6.

“When I was younger (in 2004) I used to come here often with my mom,” said Aquino, “[but] because of all of the other places that are opening, you can get the same thing for cheaper prices.”

Payless at Southland Plaza in South San Diego

Smith agreed and said “There you go, there’s more options [to buy discount shoes] now.”

“I mean you can go to Ross, TJ Maxx, and the Nike factory,” she said, “… and with my military discount – it would’ve [probably] been cheaper.”

Alex, the sales rep inside the store, said he couldn’t comment on any details of the closings of many of the 4,400 Payless shoe stores worldwide. He did, although, say his store will be closing its doors on July 10. He added that he and his co-workers will be relocating to a different shoe store. Prices in this store were discounted at 20-40 percent off, and the sales fixtures were up for grabs.

“It’s no longer the discount shoe store [and] the prices are up there,” Khristin said, “and I only buy when the shoes are on sale or if I’m desperate.” She works in the catering industry and picked up a pair of SafeTStep ($39) non-slip work shoes and “fun ‘lil” sandals. She buys her shoes at Wal-Mart, which is two stores down, but this day she was lured by the bright window display.

“Store closing, everything on sale, and everything must go” signs were plastered on all of the windows.

“I grew up coming to Payless (since the 1970s-1980s) [because] it was the functional discount store and it was practical,” Khristin said, “[but] I mean the prices have gone up, and the quality isn’t there.”

She said that she goes to “Kohls, Burlington, Ross, and Marshalls for the better quality at a discount.”

Michael is another old-school customer who’s been coming here since the 1980s. He was “diggin'” on the Kangaroos for $29.99 (original retail was $49.99) in the store. “Man [I think] that’s how much they were back then, I’m gonna call my mom and ask,” he said.

Michael blames some of the Payless stores’ demise on the internet. “Amazon and eBay have sellers killing the market,” he said, “they got companies selling direct from China (where most of the shoes are manufactured), closeout types who buy in bulk for pennies on the dollar, and let’s not forget the downtown Los Angeles garment district vendors, who are next down on the chain (of the wholesale market). Combine low prices with low overhead, savvy [computer] programs to handle invoices, inventory, and marketing, and then free shipping — it’s gonna be hard to compete.”

“Champion shoes (as low as $19) from Payless are the best,” said Luisa, a City College student, “I have three pairs [and] all in different colors.”

“I’ve been shopping there for at least nine years,” said Hoppe, a custom jewelry designer, “their low prices and BOGO kept me coming back, and just like any other higher-end brand; you have to weed through and find stylish, up-to-date fashionable pieces you like.”

Patsy, a fashionista/collector, has been scooping up the "Christian Siriano runway stuff" at the stores. "[The] prices here are cheap; when I was at the Chula [Vista] store, I saw a bunch of sandals for $10," she said, "now that's low for unused shoes [that are] mint-in-box." She wishes that the Siriano runway-line ($39-$49) will sell for that cheap one day.

Besides the Stonecrest Plaza closure, the Payless ShoeSource website has listed six other San Diego (and vicinity) stores that will be closing: Southland Plaza (South San Diego), Main Street Village (El Cajon), Clairemont Town Square, North County Square (Vista), Broadway Plaza (Chula Vista), and Encinitas Ranch Town Center.

On April 4, Payless ShoeSource (“Payless,” “the Company”) posted a press release which reads in part “that it has filed a voluntary petition for reorganization pursuant to Chapter 11 of the U.S. Federal Bankruptcy Code to facilitate the financial and operational restructuring necessary to strengthen its balance sheet and position the Company for long-term success.”

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Larry Johnson: poet and author of Veins and Alloy

A past contributor to the San Diego Reader
Next Article

Will a $46,000 federally funded COVID-19 drone fly in El Cajon?

Justice Department money for aerial spy cams rejected in South Carolina
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close