SAE brothers. There are seventeen fraternities and eleven sororities officially recognized by San Diego State University.
  • SAE brothers. There are seventeen fraternities and eleven sororities officially recognized by San Diego State University.
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I Don’t Need This Aggregation

Reggae (the music played by impoverished Jamaican blacks, often revolutionary in nature) blasts from the back yard of a nearby fraternity party. Young men holler, wiggle their behinds, and wave beer cans in time to the lively music. Bright lights shine on young girls dancing. Laughter. “Hey, bitch!” calls a frat-boy to a sister on the sidewalk. “Only kidding,” he consoles as he wraps his arm around her waist, and the two move off down the street.

By Abe Opincar, June 2, 1988 | Read full article

Five years ago there were 1800 attorneys practicing in San Diego County; today, the figure is closer to 3500.

Five years ago there were 1800 attorneys practicing in San Diego County; today, the figure is closer to 3500.

Rick Geary

The Last Judgement

Would-be lawyers also face the hurdle of keeping hope alive despite the reality that San Diego has become glutted with lawyers. Five years ago there were 1800 attorneys practicing in San Diego County; today, the figure is closer to 3500. The number of law students enrolled in San Diego's four law schools is equal to the present number of local attorneys, so in a few years the number of San Diego lawyers may double again.

By Manny Ramos, Aug. 17, 1978 | Read full article

Here I am phone-banking for the San Diego Teacher’s Committee on Central America. Here I am attending a “Vigil for Peace and Justice in Central America.”

Here I am phone-banking for the San Diego Teacher’s Committee on Central America. Here I am attending a “Vigil for Peace and Justice in Central America.”

Larry Ashton

Everlasting Uncertainty

Pearce was lured from Ohio State by UCSD’s founder, Roger Revelle, to launch the “softer” department of literary studies, which eventually expanded to include undergraduates. It was Revelle’s idea to mix the humanities, music, and literature with the theoretical sciences. Pearce surprised them in 1968 by co-writing a letter with philosophy professor Richard Popkin that “congratulated] Japanese students who demonstrated against the visit of the U.S. nuclear aircraft carrier Enterprise” in San Diego harbor.

By Thomas Larson, Jan. 7, 1999 | Read full article

Aztec Center, SDSU. "Go to the Commons. Look at the students. They're rarely interacting about anything academic."

Aztec Center, SDSU. "Go to the Commons. Look at the students. They're rarely interacting about anything academic."

Where do those poor kids go?

"Now, the faculty is under such pressure to publish that they don't even come to campus. Most of them try to teach a schedule of two days a week. I could go over to the history offices and walk through that whole part of the building and not find a single faculty member in an office with the door open. Not one. Faculty members don't have time to talk to students.”

By Ken Kuhlken, June 17, 2004 | Read full article

Class Struggle

“We had a lot of cliques at my school. There were the drama kids, and we had a group we actually called the Clique. It was just the people that seemed to party a lot, and they all seemed to be not interested in talking to anybody else or being friends with anybody else. They would on their own, but as a group, they wouldn’t. Everyone had their little groups at lunch.”

By Matthew Lickona, Jan. 20, 2000 | Read full article

On a later visit to the Immaculata, I stopped to visit the Blessed Sacrament in the tabernacle and noticed that it was housed off to the side, in a chapel honoring Saint Gertrude.

On a later visit to the Immaculata, I stopped to visit the Blessed Sacrament in the tabernacle and noticed that it was housed off to the side, in a chapel honoring Saint Gertrude.

You're Going to Wait 'Til You're Married to Have Sex?

She does not come from a religious background and is here “because I wanted to learn about religion. It’s easier to talk to people when you understand their beliefs and stuff. Now, I’ve taken a world-religions class and a scripture class, and I feel so much more knowledgeable. We went and got our nails done the other day, and we were talking to the guy about Buddhism, and I felt like I could speak to him about it.”

War Memorial, San Diego Sate University. In Memory of our Classmates Whose Lives Were Taken From us During our Nation’s Military Conflicts.

War Memorial, San Diego Sate University. In Memory of our Classmates Whose Lives Were Taken From us During our Nation’s Military Conflicts.

By Matthew Lickona, Feb. 24, 2000 | Read full article

What would you do for Uncle Sam?

“The media wants us to look at ourselves like we’re the saviors of the world. But if you go to another country, that country is the savior of the world. We look for the bad guys in all the other countries, and Hitler was one of the baddest, but they don’t want to admit to anything that went wrong here. So why should we stand up and just be all excited about defending the country?”

By Matthew Lickona, March 30, 2000 | Read full article

Watermelon Queen, 2003. "In a fit of nonsense I proceeded to write an entire exam on watermelons."

Watermelon Queen, 2003. "In a fit of nonsense I proceeded to write an entire exam on watermelons."

Students Compete to Make a Mess

The record, set in 1974, still stands at 167 feet 4 inches. “We have a little measuring tool thing,” said Joshel. “We order a bunch of watermelons from a farmer, because we give out watermelon to eat. We ask for an extra-big one for the drop.” But one has to wonder if the record will be broken by a super-sized watermelon. “I don’t know,” said Joshel. “ Sometimes it hard to find the farthest seed.”

By Jeanne Schinto, June 3, 2004 | Read full article

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