Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

San Diego Union-Tribune — the Copley era

Helen and David Copley, Eileen Jackson, Neil Morgan and Walter Cronkite, Mayor O’Connor’s slumming in Balboa Park

The Last Rewrite

That night I spoke to winos and street types who talked about murder, to councilmen and cops who spoke of shooting “to incapacitate,” and to people at the Knickerbocker Hotel who knew Brown. The main story had already been written by Preston Turegano, and I did two others: one of them a profile of Brown. I left the newsroom at 2:00 a.m. What appeared in the Tribune nine hours later was not essentially what I had written. 

By Bob Dorn, Sept. 27, 1979 | Read full article

Foxhill

Slow Fall from Fox Hill

“I thought I would see my father a lot, but I didn’t. My father then married Helen (Helen Hunt). She was his former secretary, and she had her own son, David. From 1966, when he married Helen, until 1970, I hardly ever saw my father. Even when he came East on business, he wouldn’t call me at school because she wouldn’t like that. She had her own son and my father adopted him after the wedding.”

By Eleanor Widmer, July 6, 1978 | Read full article

Eileen Jackson retired from the Union at 70. Then, at the behest of Tribune editor Neil Morgan, she returned in 1981 to write a column in the Tribune.

Everybody Who’s Anybody

“The police called me one morning and said, ‘We believe someone is using your column to plan burglaries. Sixty people have been robbed.’” The San Diego Museum of Man was giving a Halloween party. The police asked Mrs. Jackson to announce the party in her column, together with a list of names of people who planned to attend. The police arranged to have a policeman in the house of each person named.

By Judith Moore, June 30, 1988 | Read full article

Beneath the headline “It’s as hot here as the desert,” is a large, full-color photo of tomboyishly-clad O’Connor and DaRosa parading past a half-naked, black homeless.

A Summer Night’s Fever Dream

DaRosa is telling us that our Queen Mayor, our Siddhartha/Cinderella, is searching. Her implied disenchantment with orthodox Catholicism has brought her to taboo’s door, a lurid pagan land lies beyond its threshold. It is this tension that has fueled DaRosa’s literary dynamics. It is this conflict that has orchestrated O’Connor’s every move. The deconstructed text is an easy read. Maureen’s foray into poverty was a vehicle for personal exorcism. Her demon: the male power elite.

By Arturo Cardenas-Ruiz, Sept. 15, 1988 | Read full article

Careful lest the public forget how very close they are, Morgan has chronicled his Master’s every move, thought, and desire. They have even sailed together, as Morgan ofttimes has reminded us.

I’m Morgan, He’s Cronkite

Scholars, particularly Vjaceslav Vsevolodovic Ivanov, director of the Section on Structural Typology of the Institute of Slavic and Balkan Walter Leland Cronkite Studies at the Soviet Academy of Sciences in St. Petersburg, have suggested that Morgan’s outlandish aggrandizement of Cronkite is little more than an attempt to convince his readership that he (Morgan) is indeed an influential-newspaper-editor-with-well-connected-friends-in-high-places. [Morgan’s Tribune column] reflects nothing more than a woefully misplaced sense of self-importance,” states Ivanov.

By Abe Opincar, Dec. 22, 1988 | Read full article

Despite the festering labor dispute, the Union and Tribune continue to prosper financially.

The Copley Press Used to be Considered a Friendly Employer

As the discussion heated up around midnight, a former Tribune reporter who had been promoted to assistant managing editor slipped away from the party. Later that morning, he was due at the U-T plant in Mission Valley to help the company put out a test version of the newspaper, without the services of union members. The U-T was prepared to publish without them. “They’re running a scab paper tonight,” one of the other guests noted quietly.

By Matt Potter, March 22, 1990 | Read full article

Neil Morgan announced that the marketing consultant had recommended that the Tribune be converted into a morning tabloid.

Red Sky at Morning, Morgan Take Warning

Urban has reportedly argued that readers under 35 require advice columns and youth-oriented investigative reporting. But Tribune staffers complain that Urban's vague suggestions are difficult to define, much less implement. They worry that Morgan, with his old-fashioned, boosterish approach to newspapering, is being set up for a fall and may take the Tribune with him. "The morning tabloid idea doesn't make any sense at all. Why would they want to compete with themselves in the morning?" 

By Matt Potter, May 2, 1991 | Read full article

Helen Copley. In an odd twist of fate, Helen married her boss, Jim Copley, and David Hunt became David Copley, who would grow up to be president of the Copley newspaper chain.

A Son by any Other Name

In January 1977, an unusual bill began a swift course through the Iowa legislature. It was intended to correct an odd quirk of state law that made it illegal to obtain an Iowa divorce in any county other than the one in which both parties had lived. “As I recall, this thing just sailed right through,” recalls Walter Conlon, an Iowa attorney who was then a freshman legislator. “But I swear to you, I never heard of Helen Copley.”

By Matt Potter, June 20, 1991 | Read full article

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Unexpected views from some San Diego African Americans

"I don't care if you're black or white"

The Last Rewrite

That night I spoke to winos and street types who talked about murder, to councilmen and cops who spoke of shooting “to incapacitate,” and to people at the Knickerbocker Hotel who knew Brown. The main story had already been written by Preston Turegano, and I did two others: one of them a profile of Brown. I left the newsroom at 2:00 a.m. What appeared in the Tribune nine hours later was not essentially what I had written. 

By Bob Dorn, Sept. 27, 1979 | Read full article

Foxhill

Slow Fall from Fox Hill

“I thought I would see my father a lot, but I didn’t. My father then married Helen (Helen Hunt). She was his former secretary, and she had her own son, David. From 1966, when he married Helen, until 1970, I hardly ever saw my father. Even when he came East on business, he wouldn’t call me at school because she wouldn’t like that. She had her own son and my father adopted him after the wedding.”

By Eleanor Widmer, July 6, 1978 | Read full article

Eileen Jackson retired from the Union at 70. Then, at the behest of Tribune editor Neil Morgan, she returned in 1981 to write a column in the Tribune.

Everybody Who’s Anybody

“The police called me one morning and said, ‘We believe someone is using your column to plan burglaries. Sixty people have been robbed.’” The San Diego Museum of Man was giving a Halloween party. The police asked Mrs. Jackson to announce the party in her column, together with a list of names of people who planned to attend. The police arranged to have a policeman in the house of each person named.

By Judith Moore, June 30, 1988 | Read full article

Beneath the headline “It’s as hot here as the desert,” is a large, full-color photo of tomboyishly-clad O’Connor and DaRosa parading past a half-naked, black homeless.

A Summer Night’s Fever Dream

DaRosa is telling us that our Queen Mayor, our Siddhartha/Cinderella, is searching. Her implied disenchantment with orthodox Catholicism has brought her to taboo’s door, a lurid pagan land lies beyond its threshold. It is this tension that has fueled DaRosa’s literary dynamics. It is this conflict that has orchestrated O’Connor’s every move. The deconstructed text is an easy read. Maureen’s foray into poverty was a vehicle for personal exorcism. Her demon: the male power elite.

By Arturo Cardenas-Ruiz, Sept. 15, 1988 | Read full article

Careful lest the public forget how very close they are, Morgan has chronicled his Master’s every move, thought, and desire. They have even sailed together, as Morgan ofttimes has reminded us.

I’m Morgan, He’s Cronkite

Scholars, particularly Vjaceslav Vsevolodovic Ivanov, director of the Section on Structural Typology of the Institute of Slavic and Balkan Walter Leland Cronkite Studies at the Soviet Academy of Sciences in St. Petersburg, have suggested that Morgan’s outlandish aggrandizement of Cronkite is little more than an attempt to convince his readership that he (Morgan) is indeed an influential-newspaper-editor-with-well-connected-friends-in-high-places. [Morgan’s Tribune column] reflects nothing more than a woefully misplaced sense of self-importance,” states Ivanov.

By Abe Opincar, Dec. 22, 1988 | Read full article

Despite the festering labor dispute, the Union and Tribune continue to prosper financially.

The Copley Press Used to be Considered a Friendly Employer

As the discussion heated up around midnight, a former Tribune reporter who had been promoted to assistant managing editor slipped away from the party. Later that morning, he was due at the U-T plant in Mission Valley to help the company put out a test version of the newspaper, without the services of union members. The U-T was prepared to publish without them. “They’re running a scab paper tonight,” one of the other guests noted quietly.

By Matt Potter, March 22, 1990 | Read full article

Neil Morgan announced that the marketing consultant had recommended that the Tribune be converted into a morning tabloid.

Red Sky at Morning, Morgan Take Warning

Urban has reportedly argued that readers under 35 require advice columns and youth-oriented investigative reporting. But Tribune staffers complain that Urban's vague suggestions are difficult to define, much less implement. They worry that Morgan, with his old-fashioned, boosterish approach to newspapering, is being set up for a fall and may take the Tribune with him. "The morning tabloid idea doesn't make any sense at all. Why would they want to compete with themselves in the morning?" 

By Matt Potter, May 2, 1991 | Read full article

Helen Copley. In an odd twist of fate, Helen married her boss, Jim Copley, and David Hunt became David Copley, who would grow up to be president of the Copley newspaper chain.

A Son by any Other Name

In January 1977, an unusual bill began a swift course through the Iowa legislature. It was intended to correct an odd quirk of state law that made it illegal to obtain an Iowa divorce in any county other than the one in which both parties had lived. “As I recall, this thing just sailed right through,” recalls Walter Conlon, an Iowa attorney who was then a freshman legislator. “But I swear to you, I never heard of Helen Copley.”

By Matt Potter, June 20, 1991 | Read full article

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Jorge Hank's wealthy nephew heads for White House dinner

Tijuana billionaire's relative an AMLO invite
Next Article

A poem for Independence Day by Francis Scott Key

His poem “Defence of Fort McHenry” became the lyrics to “The Star-Spangled Banner”
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close