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Mira Mesa braces for mega population growth

Stone Creek project may create up to 50,000 commutes a day

Carroll Canyon Road (gray line next to the green) will extend from I-805 to I-15.
Carroll Canyon Road (gray line next to the green) will extend from I-805 to I-15.

The decades-old Vulcan mining operation on nearly 300 acres of Carroll Canyon will be a huge housing project if developers' lobbying efforts are successful.

Bordered by Mira Mesa Boulevard, Miramar Road, Camino Santa Fe, and Black Mountain Road, the significant size of the proposed project is the topic of much community concern.

The initial 2005 proposal for Stone Creek was for 9800 residential units. A more modest plan of 4445 units is currently proposed along with 1.2 million square feet of commercial and industrial space.

Mira Mesa planning chair Jeff Stevens said recently, “Besides traffic issues, parks are a major concern. People need an active park to play in, not the passive park Vulcan proposes. The population is 80,000 in our community plan and we only have two community parks when we should have three. We’ll be approaching 100,000 people after this project.”

Stevens said the planning group made traffic recommendations in January 2016 after reviewing a 2015 Vulcan traffic study.

“If Vulcan did all the things we recommended, it would satisfy the planning group. Vulcan hasn’t agreed to do them. On some of the needed traffic improvements they say they’ll make a contribution instead of doing the actual work. It doesn’t do us any good to have a contribution for a road that needs to be there because of their project.”

While Vulcan is extending Carroll Canyon Road and some other improvements, Stevens said that a contribution on other things without any idea of when work will be completed isn’t enough and that Vulcan needs to do the work and get reimbursed later, if needed.

According to Stevens, “The next step for Vulcan is to complete the [environmental impact report]. They were talking about having it completed this fall and then going to the planning commission but Vulcan said the report was delayed because of a lawsuit.”

City spokesman José Ysea said that there isn’t any hold-up via litigation and that Vulcan is currently preparing the required technical studies. Once completed, he said the city will prepare the environmental impact report. It should be noted that the technical studies prepared by Vulcan will be what the city relies upon to prepare the report.

Besides living next door to the proposed Stone Creek development in Scripps Ranch, Craig Jones has 18 years' experience as a planner with different San Diego municipalities.

“Living in Scripps Ranch and having to drive Mira Mesa Boulevard is a horrible experience," says Jones. "I avoid it even at off-peak hours. During peak hours, it’s just awful. I don’t see how Mira Mesa can handle the extra traffic.”

Jones asked if the project was being sold as “transit-oriented,” which he said is a misnomer with more and more traffic being dumped on an already stressed area. His guesstimate via the SANDAG traffic generation rate list is that about 35,000 to 50,000 additional trips per day would be generated from the development.

Stevens said, “Stone Creek is being planned as a transit-oriented development, but they have not asked for traffic mitigation to be reduced because of it. There are two transit stops in their master plan, which will initially have bus service and eventually a trolley stop if the city follows through with its long-term plans. We do have a concern with their phasing [through 2030]. If you want people to use transit instead of cars, the transit needs to be in place from the beginning and very reliable. As currently planned, they will build the lower-density parts of the project on the east and west first, and the higher-density core last. For it to really work as transit-oriented development you need the higher-density core and transit stops first.”

Jones also commented on the negative impact that money and influence has had on the governmental process. He said if you ask most anyone in government who their customer is, their response will be “the developers” instead of the real customer, “the public interest.”

When it comes to money and influence, the Stone Creek development has put its money where its mouth is. According to lobbying disclosure forms, super-lobbyist Paul Robinson (Hecht Solberg Robinson Goldberg and Bagley) is at the head of the Stone Creek approval charge. Robinson came out of former mayor Pete Wilson’s office after spending years with the city attorney’s office. Also joining the crusade is Rath Miller, led by Phil Rath, a former aide to ex-mayor Jerry Sanders.

Civitas in Mission Valley is a similar massive, multi-phase construction project being created from a former mining operation.

According to Stevens, Robinson has likely been lobbying for Stone Creek since 2006, and Rath since at least 2013. Palms have been pressed all the way to the top in the mayor’s office, development services, planning department, city attorney’s office, Parks and Recreation department, and the offices of council districts 1, 5, and 6. Campaign contributions and fundraising efforts to the tune of more than $700K (2012–2016) were bestowed on those who were lobbied about the Stone Creek development as well as those in council districts next door to the project area, including that of District 7 with their own similar Vulcan mega-development underway in Mission Valley.

Jeff Powell from councilmember Scott Sherman’s District 7 office said that once the Mission Valley project is completed, it will deserve to be defined as “transit-oriented.”

While driving through this Mission Valley development, I saw streets lined with cars, condominiums, passive parks, electric vehicle stations, but not one bus stop. I asked a construction worker if a bus stop was in the works. He laughed, “Oh no, no way!”

Outside the development, I found one bus stop across the street on Mission Valley Road. There is also a trolley station within a 10–20 minute walk.

Repeated requests for comment went unanswered from Vulcan and others associated with the project.

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Carroll Canyon Road (gray line next to the green) will extend from I-805 to I-15.
Carroll Canyon Road (gray line next to the green) will extend from I-805 to I-15.

The decades-old Vulcan mining operation on nearly 300 acres of Carroll Canyon will be a huge housing project if developers' lobbying efforts are successful.

Bordered by Mira Mesa Boulevard, Miramar Road, Camino Santa Fe, and Black Mountain Road, the significant size of the proposed project is the topic of much community concern.

The initial 2005 proposal for Stone Creek was for 9800 residential units. A more modest plan of 4445 units is currently proposed along with 1.2 million square feet of commercial and industrial space.

Mira Mesa planning chair Jeff Stevens said recently, “Besides traffic issues, parks are a major concern. People need an active park to play in, not the passive park Vulcan proposes. The population is 80,000 in our community plan and we only have two community parks when we should have three. We’ll be approaching 100,000 people after this project.”

Stevens said the planning group made traffic recommendations in January 2016 after reviewing a 2015 Vulcan traffic study.

“If Vulcan did all the things we recommended, it would satisfy the planning group. Vulcan hasn’t agreed to do them. On some of the needed traffic improvements they say they’ll make a contribution instead of doing the actual work. It doesn’t do us any good to have a contribution for a road that needs to be there because of their project.”

While Vulcan is extending Carroll Canyon Road and some other improvements, Stevens said that a contribution on other things without any idea of when work will be completed isn’t enough and that Vulcan needs to do the work and get reimbursed later, if needed.

According to Stevens, “The next step for Vulcan is to complete the [environmental impact report]. They were talking about having it completed this fall and then going to the planning commission but Vulcan said the report was delayed because of a lawsuit.”

City spokesman José Ysea said that there isn’t any hold-up via litigation and that Vulcan is currently preparing the required technical studies. Once completed, he said the city will prepare the environmental impact report. It should be noted that the technical studies prepared by Vulcan will be what the city relies upon to prepare the report.

Besides living next door to the proposed Stone Creek development in Scripps Ranch, Craig Jones has 18 years' experience as a planner with different San Diego municipalities.

“Living in Scripps Ranch and having to drive Mira Mesa Boulevard is a horrible experience," says Jones. "I avoid it even at off-peak hours. During peak hours, it’s just awful. I don’t see how Mira Mesa can handle the extra traffic.”

Jones asked if the project was being sold as “transit-oriented,” which he said is a misnomer with more and more traffic being dumped on an already stressed area. His guesstimate via the SANDAG traffic generation rate list is that about 35,000 to 50,000 additional trips per day would be generated from the development.

Stevens said, “Stone Creek is being planned as a transit-oriented development, but they have not asked for traffic mitigation to be reduced because of it. There are two transit stops in their master plan, which will initially have bus service and eventually a trolley stop if the city follows through with its long-term plans. We do have a concern with their phasing [through 2030]. If you want people to use transit instead of cars, the transit needs to be in place from the beginning and very reliable. As currently planned, they will build the lower-density parts of the project on the east and west first, and the higher-density core last. For it to really work as transit-oriented development you need the higher-density core and transit stops first.”

Jones also commented on the negative impact that money and influence has had on the governmental process. He said if you ask most anyone in government who their customer is, their response will be “the developers” instead of the real customer, “the public interest.”

When it comes to money and influence, the Stone Creek development has put its money where its mouth is. According to lobbying disclosure forms, super-lobbyist Paul Robinson (Hecht Solberg Robinson Goldberg and Bagley) is at the head of the Stone Creek approval charge. Robinson came out of former mayor Pete Wilson’s office after spending years with the city attorney’s office. Also joining the crusade is Rath Miller, led by Phil Rath, a former aide to ex-mayor Jerry Sanders.

Civitas in Mission Valley is a similar massive, multi-phase construction project being created from a former mining operation.

According to Stevens, Robinson has likely been lobbying for Stone Creek since 2006, and Rath since at least 2013. Palms have been pressed all the way to the top in the mayor’s office, development services, planning department, city attorney’s office, Parks and Recreation department, and the offices of council districts 1, 5, and 6. Campaign contributions and fundraising efforts to the tune of more than $700K (2012–2016) were bestowed on those who were lobbied about the Stone Creek development as well as those in council districts next door to the project area, including that of District 7 with their own similar Vulcan mega-development underway in Mission Valley.

Jeff Powell from councilmember Scott Sherman’s District 7 office said that once the Mission Valley project is completed, it will deserve to be defined as “transit-oriented.”

While driving through this Mission Valley development, I saw streets lined with cars, condominiums, passive parks, electric vehicle stations, but not one bus stop. I asked a construction worker if a bus stop was in the works. He laughed, “Oh no, no way!”

Outside the development, I found one bus stop across the street on Mission Valley Road. There is also a trolley station within a 10–20 minute walk.

Repeated requests for comment went unanswered from Vulcan and others associated with the project.

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Comments
29

These anti-development articles by SD Reader are increasingly out of touch with reality. San Diego needs more housing. Period. You can't be a champion of homelessness, low-income and minority folks, nor claim to be an informed progressive if you ignore the fact that housing is a social justice issue, and that the growing lack of affordable housing in San Diego is creating immense social and economic pain to low and middle income folks.

The sad (and often ignored) truth is that our housing crisis is the result of anti-development sentiments and exclusionary zoning created by wealthy and entitled homeowners seeking to raise their own home values and to selfishly keep out others (who, most often, happen to be their children and grandchildren).

SD Reader has done a deplorable job of framing this discussion, instead always defaulting on the easy, old, and lazy narratives of greedy developers, paid off politicians, and poor grandmas stuck in traffic. How about we be a bit more comprehensive in our reporting SDR? How about we actually start a real conversation about our housing crisis? I know it's easier to keep writing the same article over and over again, but the only thing pieces like this do is perpetuate a narrow NIMBY perspective when we need to be productively engaging the public to find real solutions. I challenge you all to think a bit more.

Sept. 16, 2016

Can we ever stop building? What happens when all of San Diego is paved over with 100 story apartment buildings, and still more people want to crowd in?

If you don't build it, they can't come. There is no "shortage" of housing... we just need to tell people who cannot afford to live here that pretty much everywhere else in the country is more affordable, and they just need to go there.

Quit with the childish "social justice" nonsense. Life isn't fair. It isn't a huge injustice that you don't get everything you want. Sometimes you have to compromise and accept reality.

Sept. 19, 2016

First, the fact that you think San Diego is somehow attracting our current population growth shows you are less than knowledgable about our communities demographic and migration patters. We have had net outbound migration for many years. More people are moving away than coming in. Our population growth is the result of child birth, which makes our housing crisis even more horrendous since we are essentially pricing out our own children and grandchildren from the opportunities we once had.

Another issue: San Diego is not the only place where people want to live. Yeah it's great here, but there are only so many jobs to support so many people. We don't need to build "100 story apartment buildings" because their has never been that much demand. What we do need is to keep up with the moderate demand we have now, instead of building fewer homes or none at all.

Lastly, social justice is not childish. Dismissing the plight of others (your neighbors, children, etc.) is.

Sept. 19, 2016

Building more housing while ignoring traffic concerns first is more "out of touch with reality" than anti-development articles. Big thanks to The Reader and community protesters who question these mega developments. The majority of city council certainly has a track record for signing off on these high density projects. Especially by those council members looking for higher aspirations in the political world (one paid for by big money developers and the like).

The sad (and always ignored) truth is that everyone wants to live in San Diego, and there is a reason.. It is because we are not the LA basin, paved from corner to corner. You can actually hike a trail here. This can be attributed to forward thinking people like Elen Scripps, Marian Bear, and countless others. Speaking of Marian Bear, this is exactly what should be put in Carroll Canyon. Open space with a major artery running along one side of the canyon. Connect I-15 to I-805.

"Repeated requests for comment went unanswered from Vulcan and others associated with the project." covers your assertion that SD Reader has done a deplorable job of framing this discussion.

Lastly.. Your (and other development minded people) use of the word NIMBY is played out. This development is nowhere near my backyard (same with Carlsbad preserve and other projects), yet I oppose it. You might want to stop using that as your typical "go to" argument.

Sept. 19, 2016

The "mega" developer and the lobbied politician make another tired appearance before the court. Yawn.

You do realize that rents and housing costs in Los Angeles are higher than they are in San Diego. If LA was less desirable than SD, wouldn't it be the opposite case? Go check zillow for yourself. A little bit of research would do you some good rather than relying on anecdotal evidence.

"NIMBY" is not a literal term in most circles, nor should it be in your dictionary. You don't have to be near a proposed development to unjustly oppose it as a NIMBY. It's also the only term available to describe entitled and privileged folks demanding their poorer neighbors and children hike it to Phoenix. So I'll stick with NIMBY, thank you.

Sept. 19, 2016

Thinkers you're brainless.La AND OC rents are nearly the same as SD rents. La AND OC wages are 30% higher

Sept. 21, 2016

Every single comment you have ever made on SD Reader has been a pro-development, "pave the open space and build high-density housing" comment.

The only question is whether your hyper-aggressive development agenda comes from being employed by a developer or by a public-relations firm that works for developers.

Sept. 22, 2016

RIGHT NOW Mira Mesa needs more lanes on Miramar rd, mm bl and all other major roads. After the new development is added every major road will be a parking lot five days a week

Sept. 21, 2016

Since you're not a NIMBY and are pro homebuilding, what's your community? Let's lobby to have your whole neighborhood reasoned to five story apt, townhome and condo. That will create four times the housing near you! 😛

Sept. 21, 2016

I have lived here all my life. I am dismayed at all the development with a lack of corresponding infrastructure improvements and parks. If people need social justice let them return to Boston, Chicago, New York or what other place they came from. Need cheap housing, go where it's cheap. Cleveland, Detroit. San Diego has ALWAYS been expensive and building more and more residences in this desert is only making the livability worse. More traffic, more smog, and more people using the same parks we had 50 years ago.

So kudos to the Reader. They are speaking my sentiments.

Sept. 16, 2016

Congratulations on being a native San Diegan (as am I). Locals like us may know our communities well, but that does not give us the right to discriminate against newcomers, be they from out of state or our own children.

We live in a free market, people can live wherever they like and/or can afford. That does not mean we should promote policies that force low income, middle income, minorities and young families to move out into the desert because of the vested interests of baby boomer retirees who's only concerns seem to revolve around time spent at a traffic light and how fast they can get to and from Vons.

San Diego has always been expensive, BUT IT DOES NOT HAVE TO BE. Because of our poor planning, mismanagement, and shortsightedness, we have created an escalating crisis, which the Reader is ignoring. We do need to invest in infrastructure, but the entire community, not just developers providing needed homes, should pay for such needs. Want a new park? Pay a surcharge on already reduced prop 13 property taxes. Want less traffic and smog? Advocate, take and support public transit.

We cannot turn our backs to the future to selfishly horde and deny the opportunities we were given, from them. SD Reader may speak to your limited and self-centered concerns, but they are failing miserably in addressing the problems facing the less-than-entitled next generation of San Diegans.

Sept. 18, 2016

"Locals like us may know our communities well, but that does not give us the right to discriminate against newcomers, be they from out of state or our own children. "

I completely disagree. Local residents DO have the right to expect local leaders to put their needs and wants ahead of the needs and wants of non-residents.

You can use "selfish" or whatever pejorative name-calling you want - but it is well within reason for residents to expect their leaders to be advocates for their needs and wants.

Sept. 19, 2016

Local residents, more specifically, homeowners, do not have an exclusive right to demand that OUR leaders only focus on their issues. Renters, transplants, and the next generation of San Diegans all deserve to be considered and addressed by our leaders, especially in this housing crisis. We all contribute to our communities, even if we don't own property. OUR leaders are not representatives for HOA's only, they are elected to represent the entire community - that's how our democracy works.

And, yes, I will use whatever words I deem necessary. Thank you.

Sept. 19, 2016

A native San Diegan? You are Kumeyaay? Which band?

Sept. 19, 2016

I am a native San Diegan, born and raised. I am neither an indigenous nor aboriginal person, sorry to disappoint you.

Sept. 19, 2016

I agree with Ponzi.

I think the responsibility of the city's leaders is to act in the best interests of existing residents. I don't think they have a responsibility to somehow make San Diego an inexpensive place to live.

For any development to benefit existing residents there needs to be infrastructure improvements to go along with the development. This means significant upgrades or additions to transportation networks, power networks, and water delivery (not just barely enough to possibly handle the new traffic). Are they expanding Mira Mesa blvd or Miramar Road or SR-56 or I-15? Are they adding power plants, solar power stations or desalination plants for water needs?

For a development to actually benefit the rest of the public they better be paying for some big infrastructure improvements. That doesn't seem to be the case here. It seems like rather than putting many millions of dollars into infrastructure which would benefit the public they've decided it's more cost effective to put many thousands of dollars into politicians' pockets.

Sept. 17, 2016

I stay away from Minilla Mesa now I can't imagine the disaster this development will be.

Sept. 17, 2016

It's spelled "Manila" and your less than subtle racial jab is just sad.

Sept. 18, 2016

Thanks for the correction and the racial jab is accurate. Manila Mesa is a crime ridden ghetto.

Sept. 19, 2016

Mira Mesans themselves almost always call it Manila Mesa. You may be local, but you obviously aren't from Mira Mesa. Relax.

Sept. 19, 2016

I'm not from Mira Mesa, but I know not to offensively link "crime ridden ghetto" with an ethnic minority. That's a bit too racially charged (and completely false) for me to simply sit by and "relax"... Sad to see 1950's America alive and well in some circles, but the rest of us know better.

Sept. 19, 2016

I'm Filipino, and grew up in Mira Mesa. He's not wrong.

Go be a white knight somewhere else. You don't speak for me.

Sept. 20, 2016

Just because us Filipinos and Mira Mesans call it Manila Mesa doesn't make thinkered wrong in pointing out that AlexClarke was using it in a derogatory manner. Alex even admitted it in a follow up post.

Sept. 21, 2016

The first time I heard Mira Mesa called Manila Mesa was by a Filipino co-worker.

Taking any offense to that moniker would be like Italians being angry about a neighborhood called "Little Italy" because we called it "little."

Sept. 25, 2016

It's also Indian Mesa and Mexican Mesa

Sept. 21, 2016

Little Calcutta. Little TJ is at Gold Coast and carol canyon rd

Sept. 21, 2016

I thought it was becoming BEERA MESA with all the craft beer joint places popping up. DUI central.

Sept. 26, 2016

Thinkred Since you're not a NIMBY and are pro homebuilding, what's your community? Let's lobby to have your whole neighborhood rezoned to five story apt, townhome and condo. All single family homes will be destroyed and replaced with multi family dwellings holding far more people. That will create four times the housing near you. Yay!

Sept. 21, 2016

And also fill in all canyons and open space in your community with huge apartment towers. For the good of society . You're not from MM and know nothing of it

Sept. 21, 2016

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