4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Behold the roses, beware the bees at Otay Valley Delta

Stroll through a restored riparian habitat in South Bay

Otay Delta River Trail
Otay Delta River Trail

The Otay Delta Habitat Restoration Project is part of a much larger management plan to restore ecosystems and provide necessary habitat corridors for wildlife between San Diego Bay and Otay Mountain along the Otay River watershed. This former delta was fallow for over 30 years until non-native plants were removed and over 18,000 native trees, shrubs — herbaceous species and grasses — were planted in 2012 on over 55 acres. The land is now part of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s San Diego Bay National Wildlife Refuge.

Hikers, cyclists, dog walkers, and exercisers use the patchwork of trails throughout the refuge. A short stroll here is a good way to see restored riparian habitat along the lower Otay River. It also includes hiking a portion of the Otay Valley Regional Park on the south side of the river.

Look for blooming plants, such as the California rose.

From the staging area, walk south down a well-maintained trail of decomposed granite. Native plants such as California buckwheat, mule-fat, San Diego sunflowers, and California roses abound adjacent to the fenced trail. Wild cucumber vine intertwines through the shrubs and trees with its large prickly green fruit scattered throughout the branches. Look to the right and see a wide swathe of blue elderberry trees that have been replanted in this area. Listen for bees’ busy collecting nectar and pollinating the abundant flowers of the numerous buckwheat and other plants.

California buckwheat and mule-fat are common plants in the delta area.

Old world honeybees may not be the pollinators in this case as native bees can be more efficient for native plants plus they have an important role in crop production, especially tomatoes! There are more than 600 species of native bees in San Diego County. Most are solitary and do not live in hives, and many are specialists that can only get their food from certain host plants. Pollen is gathered to mix with nectar for “baby food loaves.” Only the adults feed on pure nectar. When the males wander too far in their work, they sometimes have to sleep out at night (or inside a flower, such as jimson weed). Only female bees can sting.

Otay Delta River Trail Junction

After about half a mile, a junction is reached. A left turn takes you past the Hollister and Fenton ponds to the Beyer Boulevard Ranger Station for the Otay Valley Regional Park. Turn right and head towards the Saturn Boulevard staging area, and then north on a single lane paved road. The restored habitat of native plants continues along this path, although there is evidence of non-natives with mustard, ice plant, and plumbago on the west side of the trail. Also seen in this area are salt heliotrope crawling along the ground and the prominent jimson weed with it’s large white flowers. Swallows and western bluebirds are seen amongst the numerous local and migratory birds in this area. The trail turns back east near the Bayshore Bikeway back to the starting point.

Map of the Otay Valley Delta

OTAY VALLEY DELTA — SOUTH BAY NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE

Distance from downtown San Diego: 11.5 miles. Allow 15 minutes driving time (Chula Vista). Take I-5 S and exit on Main Street. Head south 0.3 mile and park at the Swiss Park staging area.

Hiking length: 1.35-mile loop.

Difficulty: Easy. Elevation gain/loss 20 feet. Dogs (on leashes) and bicycles allowed. No facilities or water. Hours open: 7 a.m. to sunset, every day.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Be habitual, baby!

Timing is the toughest surf skill to master
Next Article

Pondering pernicious Papas: Jasper Hadley, Wade Hunnicut, Joey LaMotta, and others

If a puny man falls in the middle of a mansion, does anybody hear?
Otay Delta River Trail
Otay Delta River Trail

The Otay Delta Habitat Restoration Project is part of a much larger management plan to restore ecosystems and provide necessary habitat corridors for wildlife between San Diego Bay and Otay Mountain along the Otay River watershed. This former delta was fallow for over 30 years until non-native plants were removed and over 18,000 native trees, shrubs — herbaceous species and grasses — were planted in 2012 on over 55 acres. The land is now part of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s San Diego Bay National Wildlife Refuge.

Hikers, cyclists, dog walkers, and exercisers use the patchwork of trails throughout the refuge. A short stroll here is a good way to see restored riparian habitat along the lower Otay River. It also includes hiking a portion of the Otay Valley Regional Park on the south side of the river.

Look for blooming plants, such as the California rose.

From the staging area, walk south down a well-maintained trail of decomposed granite. Native plants such as California buckwheat, mule-fat, San Diego sunflowers, and California roses abound adjacent to the fenced trail. Wild cucumber vine intertwines through the shrubs and trees with its large prickly green fruit scattered throughout the branches. Look to the right and see a wide swathe of blue elderberry trees that have been replanted in this area. Listen for bees’ busy collecting nectar and pollinating the abundant flowers of the numerous buckwheat and other plants.

California buckwheat and mule-fat are common plants in the delta area.

Old world honeybees may not be the pollinators in this case as native bees can be more efficient for native plants plus they have an important role in crop production, especially tomatoes! There are more than 600 species of native bees in San Diego County. Most are solitary and do not live in hives, and many are specialists that can only get their food from certain host plants. Pollen is gathered to mix with nectar for “baby food loaves.” Only the adults feed on pure nectar. When the males wander too far in their work, they sometimes have to sleep out at night (or inside a flower, such as jimson weed). Only female bees can sting.

Otay Delta River Trail Junction

After about half a mile, a junction is reached. A left turn takes you past the Hollister and Fenton ponds to the Beyer Boulevard Ranger Station for the Otay Valley Regional Park. Turn right and head towards the Saturn Boulevard staging area, and then north on a single lane paved road. The restored habitat of native plants continues along this path, although there is evidence of non-natives with mustard, ice plant, and plumbago on the west side of the trail. Also seen in this area are salt heliotrope crawling along the ground and the prominent jimson weed with it’s large white flowers. Swallows and western bluebirds are seen amongst the numerous local and migratory birds in this area. The trail turns back east near the Bayshore Bikeway back to the starting point.

Map of the Otay Valley Delta

OTAY VALLEY DELTA — SOUTH BAY NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE

Distance from downtown San Diego: 11.5 miles. Allow 15 minutes driving time (Chula Vista). Take I-5 S and exit on Main Street. Head south 0.3 mile and park at the Swiss Park staging area.

Hiking length: 1.35-mile loop.

Difficulty: Easy. Elevation gain/loss 20 feet. Dogs (on leashes) and bicycles allowed. No facilities or water. Hours open: 7 a.m. to sunset, every day.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Promising USD grad kills mom in Pacific Beach

Massage parlor vice cop gets in trouble, honest dance teacher on El Cajon Blvd., Coronado's Don Zub, end of Otay Mesa vegetable farming, Jerry Gross bounces back, children lit, winter scenes
Next Article

Rady summer series kicks off with Berlioz, Moya, Mussorgsky

Sycuan Band comes up with $1.1 million
Comments
1

This is a wonderful way for families to spend a bit of 'family bonding' time, right here in the City.

**off road, all terrain not welcome (thank goodness) - instead families bike the trail, take in the wildlife and enjoy nature!

Jan. 30, 2016

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Drinks All Around — Bartenders' drink recipes Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories Fishing Report — What’s getting hooked from ship and shore From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town The Gonzo Report — Making the musical scene, or at least reporting from it Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Outdoors — Weekly changes in flora and fauna Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Street Style — San Diego streets have style Surf Diego — Real stories from those braving the waves Theater — On stage in San Diego this week Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close