Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Is the Chargers' favorite city about to get dirtied up?

Political hitman, illegal city-council gift purveyor, flagging Chicago-owned U-T enliven stadium saga

Dean Spanos
Dean Spanos

A flagging Chicago-owned newspaper desperate for sports business, a wealthy NFL owner with an option to relocate the family football team to Los Angeles, a consultant steeped in the dark arts of the campaign hatchet job, an ex–Major League Baseball owner caught plying a city councilwoman with a trove of gifts.

That dubious lineup is just the beginning of the roster of colorful players in the putative last stand of the San Diego Chargers, note longtime observers — both Republicans and Democrats — familiar with San Diego's tradition of political corruption.

Kevin Faulconer
Fred Maas and Carl DeMaio

The revelation that Chargers owner Dean Spanos will make a run at a downtown stadium — spurning the entreaties of mayor Kevin Faulconer and his GOP establishment backers, to build in Mission Valley — has opened a veritable Pandora's Box of city scandals, from the tortured tale of the downtown baseball stadium, still costing city taxpayers almost $12 million a year in debt subsidy payments, to the political hit woman employed by Chargers honcho Fred Maas in 2012 to sully the reputation of mayoral candidate Carl DeMaio.

One point agreed on by all: Spanos likely will have to ante up many millions of dollars for a rough-and-tumble campaign if he is to have a chance at tapping the city treasury for the huge public subsidy said to be needed to build a downtown sports palace to his liking.

So far, the path to the bank for the Chargers owner and his Stockton-based family is strewn with unknowns, awaiting details of how the super-rich mogul plans to channel taxpayer dollars into his own pockets via the ballot box.

In the meantime, the city's contingent of campaign hired guns, influence-peddlers, and media types is already circling the field, seeing reward depending on which way the battle goes.

DeMaio, the Republican former city councilman who ran for mayor and then Congress, failing both times, is already out of the gate with an email to a list of prospective donors.

"Some really bad news," begins DeMaio's missive.

"It looks like San Diego voters will face at least three tax hikes on the ballot this year including a county-wide sales tax hike for climate change projects and a city tax hike for a new NFL stadium! You helped us defeat the last sales tax hike. This time we need to start EARLY and raise enough funds to get our message out."

Reform California, a political committee formerly known as Reform San Diego, is collecting the money.  Last year the group was part of a coalition, co-led by DeMaio, for a statewide pension-reform ballot effort that has since been put off until 2018.

According to California campaign contribution filings, last year Reform California took in $67,724 and spent $39,153, leaving a year-end cash balance of $31,479.  Polling in April and November of last year cost the fund a total of $19,963, according to the disclosures.

Donna Frye

Reached by phone, DeMaio said that his group is awaiting more details on the Chargers’ downtown stadium proposal and has yet to take a position on the issue, though it opposes the so-called Briggs Initiative, a hotel tax-raising initiative  drafted by attorney Cory Briggs and backed by Democratic ex–city councilwoman Donna Frye and former Padres owner John Moores and his JMI Reality partners.

According to a statement posted by the Chargers on their website February 23, the team "will begin collaborating immediately with the existing diverse citizens’ coalition led by Donna Frye and JMI Realty that has already been formed in favor of a downtown convention center expansion and educational and recreational uses in Mission Valley."

Thus far, four lobbying groups are registered to legally influence San Diego's city hall regarding the stadium issue. Longtime Chargers special counsel Mark Fabiani has been making about $50,000 each quarter, according to his disclosure reports on file with the city clerk's office.

Next comes JMI Realty, the development firm of Rancho Santa Fe's Moores, who back in the late 1990s and early 2000s spent millions to obtain a big public subsidy in the form of stadium cash and surrounding land-development rights for what became Petco Park.

The former Houstonian, who once coveted a new NFL team for that Texas city, was at the heart of the Valerie Stallings scandal, in which the councilwoman was forced to resign in the wake of a federal investigation into a series of financial considerations and gifts slipped to Stallings by Moores.

According to its most recent lobbying disclosure statement, filed January 15, JMI has registered to hold "discussions on convention center and stadium studies" with city officials.

James Chatfield
Steve Peace

The phalanx of registered lobbyists for JMI include Moores himself, JMI CEO John Kratzer, former state Democratic senator Steve Peace, lawyer Patrick Shea, JMI managing director James Chatfield, and JMI chief operating officer Bryant Burke.

Others with major financial interests seeking to apply influence regarding the costly endeavor include the San Diego and Imperial Counties Labor Council, which according to a January 29 filing, seeks to "ensure a labor friendly project.”

A December 9, 2015, disclosure filed by Associated General Contractors says the builders’ organization will "monitor" the "Chargers stadium and convention center."

Meanwhile, the Chicago-run U-T, which may have a lot of sports readership to lose if the team ultimately leaves town, has gotten in some early spin of its own in the form of a top-of-page-one opinion piece bylined by columnist Dan McSwain.

"Of course, such campaigns have a long history around the nation: Raise hotel taxes for tourism projects, and grow the local economy. Borrow money in special districts, repaid by the resulting growth."

Concludes the analysis: "Thus we return to the central challenge confronting the Chargers, with or without city officials — convincing ordinary San Diegans to help build a downtown sports entertainment district that many people surely will enjoy, with a generous helping for the NFL and the hotel industry."

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Swimming pool cleaning accounts
San Diego Reader Classified ads
March 27, 2020
Tijuana property with Pacific Ocean views
San Diego Reader Classified ads
April 5, 2020
4 beds 2 baths house, $459,000
San Diego Reader Classified ads
March 26, 2020
$750 room for rent in San Ysidro
San Diego Reader Classified ads
March 23, 2020
Engineering
San Diego Reader Classified ads
April 6, 2020
Ad
Previous article

No shelter for San Diego Home/Garden Lifestyles Magazine

“Everything was a collaborative effort, and because of that, I think we got our best work.”
Next Article

Hancock Street Cafe’s wild and crazy guy

Let’s keep snacking. One takeout at a time!
Comments
13

That old U-T: a "downtown sports entertainment district that many people surely will enjoy" - They are hilarious.

Feb. 25, 2016

James Chatfield. He looks like Max Headroom. Anyone remember Max Headroom?

Feb. 25, 2016

It seems to me that the Chargers believe there is no limit to the stupidity of the people of San Diego. They honestly think they can play these poor saps, their once faithful fans, for all their worth. First they flip everyone the bird as they exit for LA. When that doesn't work out, they come back with big smiles on their faces, acting as if they didn't stab anyone in the back, singing "Let bygones be bygones." They are only asking for everyone to vote to give them a big pot of money, which they don't really need, so they can have a brand new stadium. And of course, they expect it to be filled by those same saps they showed no appreciation for when the road out of town was looking so good. I say it's time to tell the Chargers to go suck eggs. There are other games being played and other teams to cheer for. I think the people of San Diego should build a world class soccer stadium. I's time for the people of San Diego to kick the Chargers balls for a change, and not play the fools they think we are. It's supposed to be the team plays for the city; not the other way around.

Feb. 25, 2016

It seems that the people of San Diego are as stupid as you think. A recent survey indicates that over 50% want a new stadium for the dis-Chargers. The Chargers and the Spanos clan have always wanted a downtown stadium and it looks like the taxpayers are stupid enough to go along with it. Stupid is as stupid does and the County taxpayers, if you believe Ron Roberts, are willing to chip in too. It will be years, if not decades, before anything could be built downtown and even if it does get built the Q will remain in limbo for years. The taxpayers will pay and the sports billionaires and millionaires will laugh all the way to the bank.

Feb. 27, 2016

Disappointed to read that lawyer Pat Shea is casting his lot with John Moores, who already fleeced the citizenry with Petco and environs and corrupted a city councilmember who is said to live off Moore's payoff even now. I agree with Javajoe25 that we could use a professional soccer team here -- a graceful game of finesse compared to brain-death-dealing primitive football. Soccer would draw kids -- as football doesn't now and surely won't in the future -- and it can be played at Qualcomm. We don't need any more new stadiums -- we need new streets, streetlights, curbs, sidewalks, sewer pipes and parks.

Feb. 25, 2016

Maybe the City should offer naming rights for those who want to pay for new and improved streets, streetlights, curbs, sidewalks, sewer pipes and parks. ;-)

Feb. 26, 2016

I just read today that a community near LA -- maybe Burbank? -- was changing a street name into Ikea Way, because guess what's at the end of the road? Some neighboring businesses approved, some didn't, but it's happening.

Feb. 26, 2016

It's probably not long before we'll see a "Manchester Street" in Mission Valley or elsewhere.

Feb. 27, 2016

Also, we already have this street: 3550 General Atomics Ct.

Feb. 27, 2016

Had a signature gatherer come to the house yesterday wanting me to sign a petition to put the question of whether a new stadium should be built downtown. Finally got some info out of the guy, telling me it was for the Briggs initiative. I told him "No, thank you". Then he tried the "no new taxes" line, along with the "all the jobs it would create" line as well. At that point, I told him my front porch wasn't the place for the long discussion we would have had, and wished him well.

Feb. 26, 2016

The only jobs that would be created would be construction jobs that pay well but like all construction jobs are temporary the rest would be part time low wage no benefit jobs.

Feb. 27, 2016

"Job-creator" businesses love those "part time low wage no benefit jobs" as it allows them to make huge profits.

Feb. 28, 2016

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Dean Spanos
Dean Spanos

A flagging Chicago-owned newspaper desperate for sports business, a wealthy NFL owner with an option to relocate the family football team to Los Angeles, a consultant steeped in the dark arts of the campaign hatchet job, an ex–Major League Baseball owner caught plying a city councilwoman with a trove of gifts.

That dubious lineup is just the beginning of the roster of colorful players in the putative last stand of the San Diego Chargers, note longtime observers — both Republicans and Democrats — familiar with San Diego's tradition of political corruption.

Kevin Faulconer
Fred Maas and Carl DeMaio

The revelation that Chargers owner Dean Spanos will make a run at a downtown stadium — spurning the entreaties of mayor Kevin Faulconer and his GOP establishment backers, to build in Mission Valley — has opened a veritable Pandora's Box of city scandals, from the tortured tale of the downtown baseball stadium, still costing city taxpayers almost $12 million a year in debt subsidy payments, to the political hit woman employed by Chargers honcho Fred Maas in 2012 to sully the reputation of mayoral candidate Carl DeMaio.

One point agreed on by all: Spanos likely will have to ante up many millions of dollars for a rough-and-tumble campaign if he is to have a chance at tapping the city treasury for the huge public subsidy said to be needed to build a downtown sports palace to his liking.

So far, the path to the bank for the Chargers owner and his Stockton-based family is strewn with unknowns, awaiting details of how the super-rich mogul plans to channel taxpayer dollars into his own pockets via the ballot box.

In the meantime, the city's contingent of campaign hired guns, influence-peddlers, and media types is already circling the field, seeing reward depending on which way the battle goes.

DeMaio, the Republican former city councilman who ran for mayor and then Congress, failing both times, is already out of the gate with an email to a list of prospective donors.

"Some really bad news," begins DeMaio's missive.

"It looks like San Diego voters will face at least three tax hikes on the ballot this year including a county-wide sales tax hike for climate change projects and a city tax hike for a new NFL stadium! You helped us defeat the last sales tax hike. This time we need to start EARLY and raise enough funds to get our message out."

Reform California, a political committee formerly known as Reform San Diego, is collecting the money.  Last year the group was part of a coalition, co-led by DeMaio, for a statewide pension-reform ballot effort that has since been put off until 2018.

According to California campaign contribution filings, last year Reform California took in $67,724 and spent $39,153, leaving a year-end cash balance of $31,479.  Polling in April and November of last year cost the fund a total of $19,963, according to the disclosures.

Donna Frye

Reached by phone, DeMaio said that his group is awaiting more details on the Chargers’ downtown stadium proposal and has yet to take a position on the issue, though it opposes the so-called Briggs Initiative, a hotel tax-raising initiative  drafted by attorney Cory Briggs and backed by Democratic ex–city councilwoman Donna Frye and former Padres owner John Moores and his JMI Reality partners.

According to a statement posted by the Chargers on their website February 23, the team "will begin collaborating immediately with the existing diverse citizens’ coalition led by Donna Frye and JMI Realty that has already been formed in favor of a downtown convention center expansion and educational and recreational uses in Mission Valley."

Thus far, four lobbying groups are registered to legally influence San Diego's city hall regarding the stadium issue. Longtime Chargers special counsel Mark Fabiani has been making about $50,000 each quarter, according to his disclosure reports on file with the city clerk's office.

Next comes JMI Realty, the development firm of Rancho Santa Fe's Moores, who back in the late 1990s and early 2000s spent millions to obtain a big public subsidy in the form of stadium cash and surrounding land-development rights for what became Petco Park.

The former Houstonian, who once coveted a new NFL team for that Texas city, was at the heart of the Valerie Stallings scandal, in which the councilwoman was forced to resign in the wake of a federal investigation into a series of financial considerations and gifts slipped to Stallings by Moores.

According to its most recent lobbying disclosure statement, filed January 15, JMI has registered to hold "discussions on convention center and stadium studies" with city officials.

James Chatfield
Steve Peace

The phalanx of registered lobbyists for JMI include Moores himself, JMI CEO John Kratzer, former state Democratic senator Steve Peace, lawyer Patrick Shea, JMI managing director James Chatfield, and JMI chief operating officer Bryant Burke.

Others with major financial interests seeking to apply influence regarding the costly endeavor include the San Diego and Imperial Counties Labor Council, which according to a January 29 filing, seeks to "ensure a labor friendly project.”

A December 9, 2015, disclosure filed by Associated General Contractors says the builders’ organization will "monitor" the "Chargers stadium and convention center."

Meanwhile, the Chicago-run U-T, which may have a lot of sports readership to lose if the team ultimately leaves town, has gotten in some early spin of its own in the form of a top-of-page-one opinion piece bylined by columnist Dan McSwain.

"Of course, such campaigns have a long history around the nation: Raise hotel taxes for tourism projects, and grow the local economy. Borrow money in special districts, repaid by the resulting growth."

Concludes the analysis: "Thus we return to the central challenge confronting the Chargers, with or without city officials — convincing ordinary San Diegans to help build a downtown sports entertainment district that many people surely will enjoy, with a generous helping for the NFL and the hotel industry."

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
1972 VW bus type 2 $22,000.
San Diego Reader Classified ads
March 24, 2020
$750 room for rent in San Ysidro
San Diego Reader Classified ads
March 23, 2020
Beach cruiser
San Diego Reader Classified ads
March 30, 2020
Wanted: speakers, amps
San Diego Reader Classified ads
March 24, 2020
Wanted – old playing cards decks
San Diego Reader Classified ads
March 18, 2020
Previous article

MFTJ: Neoclassical prog experiments from Mike Keneally and Scott Schorr

The whole project was a long distance collaboration
Next Article

Virus sets up San Diego fight over paying rent

Imperial Beach bans staff travel and training
Comments
13

That old U-T: a "downtown sports entertainment district that many people surely will enjoy" - They are hilarious.

Feb. 25, 2016

James Chatfield. He looks like Max Headroom. Anyone remember Max Headroom?

Feb. 25, 2016

It seems to me that the Chargers believe there is no limit to the stupidity of the people of San Diego. They honestly think they can play these poor saps, their once faithful fans, for all their worth. First they flip everyone the bird as they exit for LA. When that doesn't work out, they come back with big smiles on their faces, acting as if they didn't stab anyone in the back, singing "Let bygones be bygones." They are only asking for everyone to vote to give them a big pot of money, which they don't really need, so they can have a brand new stadium. And of course, they expect it to be filled by those same saps they showed no appreciation for when the road out of town was looking so good. I say it's time to tell the Chargers to go suck eggs. There are other games being played and other teams to cheer for. I think the people of San Diego should build a world class soccer stadium. I's time for the people of San Diego to kick the Chargers balls for a change, and not play the fools they think we are. It's supposed to be the team plays for the city; not the other way around.

Feb. 25, 2016

It seems that the people of San Diego are as stupid as you think. A recent survey indicates that over 50% want a new stadium for the dis-Chargers. The Chargers and the Spanos clan have always wanted a downtown stadium and it looks like the taxpayers are stupid enough to go along with it. Stupid is as stupid does and the County taxpayers, if you believe Ron Roberts, are willing to chip in too. It will be years, if not decades, before anything could be built downtown and even if it does get built the Q will remain in limbo for years. The taxpayers will pay and the sports billionaires and millionaires will laugh all the way to the bank.

Feb. 27, 2016

Disappointed to read that lawyer Pat Shea is casting his lot with John Moores, who already fleeced the citizenry with Petco and environs and corrupted a city councilmember who is said to live off Moore's payoff even now. I agree with Javajoe25 that we could use a professional soccer team here -- a graceful game of finesse compared to brain-death-dealing primitive football. Soccer would draw kids -- as football doesn't now and surely won't in the future -- and it can be played at Qualcomm. We don't need any more new stadiums -- we need new streets, streetlights, curbs, sidewalks, sewer pipes and parks.

Feb. 25, 2016

Maybe the City should offer naming rights for those who want to pay for new and improved streets, streetlights, curbs, sidewalks, sewer pipes and parks. ;-)

Feb. 26, 2016

I just read today that a community near LA -- maybe Burbank? -- was changing a street name into Ikea Way, because guess what's at the end of the road? Some neighboring businesses approved, some didn't, but it's happening.

Feb. 26, 2016

It's probably not long before we'll see a "Manchester Street" in Mission Valley or elsewhere.

Feb. 27, 2016

Also, we already have this street: 3550 General Atomics Ct.

Feb. 27, 2016

Had a signature gatherer come to the house yesterday wanting me to sign a petition to put the question of whether a new stadium should be built downtown. Finally got some info out of the guy, telling me it was for the Briggs initiative. I told him "No, thank you". Then he tried the "no new taxes" line, along with the "all the jobs it would create" line as well. At that point, I told him my front porch wasn't the place for the long discussion we would have had, and wished him well.

Feb. 26, 2016

The only jobs that would be created would be construction jobs that pay well but like all construction jobs are temporary the rest would be part time low wage no benefit jobs.

Feb. 27, 2016

"Job-creator" businesses love those "part time low wage no benefit jobs" as it allows them to make huge profits.

Feb. 28, 2016

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close