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KPRI finds Jesus

"K-Love" Christian radio format takes over KPRI 102.1 FM

KPRI went off the air at 3:30 p.m. Monday with Bob Dylan’s “Forever Young,” then immediately flipped to the K-Love feed.
KPRI went off the air at 3:30 p.m. Monday with Bob Dylan’s “Forever Young,” then immediately flipped to the K-Love feed.

“What would Jesus do? Certainly not fire 20 people.”

That’s how one local radio pro joked about the transition of KPRI (102.1 FM) from a locally owned, locally programmed rock station to a contemporary Christian music format owned by Sacramento-based EMF (Educational Media Foundation).

All 20 KPRI employees were told at a 10 a.m. meeting Monday that the station was sold and their jobs were over. KPRI is now known as “K-Love” and will carry EMF’s syndicated music format featuring artists who make adult contemporary songs with Christian-conscious lyrics. KPRI joins 275 EMF stations who carry the exact same K-Love format which features artists like Casting Crowns, MercyMe and NeedToBreathe.

There are no plans for any local programming on the new K-Love/KPRI.

An insider reports that KPRI was sold to EMF for $12 million.

Two other EMF stations already serve parts of San Diego County. Julian-based KLVJ (100.1 FM) and Campo-based KYDO (96.1 FM) are two of 118 stations that carry EMF’s Air-1 format which features Christian music targeted to a younger listener.

With its acquisition of KPRI, EMF will now cover most of the San Diego market.

Some Christian contemporary stations, such as Spirit 105 in Seattle, air 30- and 60-second commercials on a for-profit basis. EMF is a nonprofit company and does not air commercials on any of its 393 not-for-profit stations.

“We are 96- to 98-percent listener-supported,” says Joe Miller, vice president of signal development for EMF. He describes EMF’s spiritual direction as “evangelical with a traditional statement of faith.” KPRI co-owner Bob Hughes (who went by the name Robert when he DJ’d his noon-to-3 p.m. weekday show) tells the Reader that none of his staff “had any idea” that the station had been sold when they were given the news Monday morning. He said there were tears among the staff, which included morning host Chris Cantore (formerly of 91X) and nighttime host Kelly Cole

This is the second time Cole endured a station format shift. She was the music director and one of the better-known on-air personalities at KIFM (98.1 FM) for more than a decade before that station dropped its smooth jazz format and she lost her job.

Morning host “Madison” (Keith Miller) had been with 102.1 FM from 1997 until he left last year to own and operate his own station on the Caribbean island of Roatan.

Hughes and partner Jonathan Schwartz owned and operated 102.1 since 1996 when it was known as KXST “Sets 102” playing two- and three-song sets of classic rock artists. In 1998 the station switched to a so-called "Triple A" format in 1998 and adopted the call letters KPRI. Triple A stands for Adult Album Alternative and signified that its format would play modern rock by artists like Bonnie Raitt, U2, John Mayer and others who appeal to an audience who may not want the more aggressive approach adopted by alternative stations like 91X.

The KPRI call letters formerly identified San Diego’s trailblazing progressive station at 106.5 FM which went “underground” full time in 1968.

While Triple A stations thrive in San Francisco, Austin, Chicago, Denver, and Portland, it is a format that is not available in every city. With the passing of KPRI, Temecula’s KMYT (94.5 FM) is the only Triple A left in Southern California.

KPRI signed off at 3:30 Monday with Bob Dylan’s “Forever Young” and immediately flipped to the K-Love feed.

Bob Hughes speaks to his listeners on a video he posted Monday on KPRI’s Facebook page.

Hughes has long said that KPRI was for sale. He and Schwartz turned down an offer last year to buy the station for $8 million. It was increasingly difficult for the two owners to keep KPRI profitable. Most other local stations are corporately owned and have the economic benefit of being part of a multiple-station group, whereas KPRI was a stand-alone owned by the private partnership of Hughes and Schwartz.

Clear Channel/iHeartradio, for instance, owns seven local stations.

It’s harder for all local radio stations as advertising income has dropped significantly in eight years. An insider says all local stations took in $230-million in 2007 but last year only grossed $160-million.

Another struggle, says Hughes, is that radio ratings in many large markets like San Diego are determined by meters that resemble beepers and must be carried on your person. He explains that professionals who like KPRI, “simply aren’t going to wear those meters everywhere they go for an extra couple of dollars a week.” In the latest Nielsen ratings KPRI was in 23rd place among all local listeners while the two alternative stations, 91X and FM-94/9 were tied for 18th.

Hughes proudly boasts that KPRI had a stellar record of presenting listener appreciation concerts, many of which were held aboard a Hornblower boat cruise. He said a handful of listeners were invited to hear Adele play live just as her career was taking off. “We just had Donavon Frankenreiter play a cruise for us last Monday [September 21]. We’ve had Imagine Dragons, Jack Johnson and Ed Sheeran play for us. And don’t forget the time we had Norah Jones and John Mayer play on the same cruise.”

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KPRI went off the air at 3:30 p.m. Monday with Bob Dylan’s “Forever Young,” then immediately flipped to the K-Love feed.
KPRI went off the air at 3:30 p.m. Monday with Bob Dylan’s “Forever Young,” then immediately flipped to the K-Love feed.

“What would Jesus do? Certainly not fire 20 people.”

That’s how one local radio pro joked about the transition of KPRI (102.1 FM) from a locally owned, locally programmed rock station to a contemporary Christian music format owned by Sacramento-based EMF (Educational Media Foundation).

All 20 KPRI employees were told at a 10 a.m. meeting Monday that the station was sold and their jobs were over. KPRI is now known as “K-Love” and will carry EMF’s syndicated music format featuring artists who make adult contemporary songs with Christian-conscious lyrics. KPRI joins 275 EMF stations who carry the exact same K-Love format which features artists like Casting Crowns, MercyMe and NeedToBreathe.

There are no plans for any local programming on the new K-Love/KPRI.

An insider reports that KPRI was sold to EMF for $12 million.

Two other EMF stations already serve parts of San Diego County. Julian-based KLVJ (100.1 FM) and Campo-based KYDO (96.1 FM) are two of 118 stations that carry EMF’s Air-1 format which features Christian music targeted to a younger listener.

With its acquisition of KPRI, EMF will now cover most of the San Diego market.

Some Christian contemporary stations, such as Spirit 105 in Seattle, air 30- and 60-second commercials on a for-profit basis. EMF is a nonprofit company and does not air commercials on any of its 393 not-for-profit stations.

“We are 96- to 98-percent listener-supported,” says Joe Miller, vice president of signal development for EMF. He describes EMF’s spiritual direction as “evangelical with a traditional statement of faith.” KPRI co-owner Bob Hughes (who went by the name Robert when he DJ’d his noon-to-3 p.m. weekday show) tells the Reader that none of his staff “had any idea” that the station had been sold when they were given the news Monday morning. He said there were tears among the staff, which included morning host Chris Cantore (formerly of 91X) and nighttime host Kelly Cole

This is the second time Cole endured a station format shift. She was the music director and one of the better-known on-air personalities at KIFM (98.1 FM) for more than a decade before that station dropped its smooth jazz format and she lost her job.

Morning host “Madison” (Keith Miller) had been with 102.1 FM from 1997 until he left last year to own and operate his own station on the Caribbean island of Roatan.

Hughes and partner Jonathan Schwartz owned and operated 102.1 since 1996 when it was known as KXST “Sets 102” playing two- and three-song sets of classic rock artists. In 1998 the station switched to a so-called "Triple A" format in 1998 and adopted the call letters KPRI. Triple A stands for Adult Album Alternative and signified that its format would play modern rock by artists like Bonnie Raitt, U2, John Mayer and others who appeal to an audience who may not want the more aggressive approach adopted by alternative stations like 91X.

The KPRI call letters formerly identified San Diego’s trailblazing progressive station at 106.5 FM which went “underground” full time in 1968.

While Triple A stations thrive in San Francisco, Austin, Chicago, Denver, and Portland, it is a format that is not available in every city. With the passing of KPRI, Temecula’s KMYT (94.5 FM) is the only Triple A left in Southern California.

KPRI signed off at 3:30 Monday with Bob Dylan’s “Forever Young” and immediately flipped to the K-Love feed.

Bob Hughes speaks to his listeners on a video he posted Monday on KPRI’s Facebook page.

Hughes has long said that KPRI was for sale. He and Schwartz turned down an offer last year to buy the station for $8 million. It was increasingly difficult for the two owners to keep KPRI profitable. Most other local stations are corporately owned and have the economic benefit of being part of a multiple-station group, whereas KPRI was a stand-alone owned by the private partnership of Hughes and Schwartz.

Clear Channel/iHeartradio, for instance, owns seven local stations.

It’s harder for all local radio stations as advertising income has dropped significantly in eight years. An insider says all local stations took in $230-million in 2007 but last year only grossed $160-million.

Another struggle, says Hughes, is that radio ratings in many large markets like San Diego are determined by meters that resemble beepers and must be carried on your person. He explains that professionals who like KPRI, “simply aren’t going to wear those meters everywhere they go for an extra couple of dollars a week.” In the latest Nielsen ratings KPRI was in 23rd place among all local listeners while the two alternative stations, 91X and FM-94/9 were tied for 18th.

Hughes proudly boasts that KPRI had a stellar record of presenting listener appreciation concerts, many of which were held aboard a Hornblower boat cruise. He said a handful of listeners were invited to hear Adele play live just as her career was taking off. “We just had Donavon Frankenreiter play a cruise for us last Monday [September 21]. We’ve had Imagine Dragons, Jack Johnson and Ed Sheeran play for us. And don’t forget the time we had Norah Jones and John Mayer play on the same cruise.”

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Comments
9

Bob- If memory serves you worked at that station in 1972-73 when it was a beautiful music station known as KJFM (right?). KJFM was the all automated sister station to Top 40 KUDE 1320 AM where you were a nighttime DJ spinning Spinners records. Back then that 500 watt AM station which barely got out of Oceanside was thought to be more valuable than the FM station. Wow!

Sept. 28, 2015

Yep, and one night a week a high school kid by the name of Ken Leighton came by to read news about his school. I hear he never amounted to much and the last I heard he was seen stumbling along Coast Highway in Oceanside asking people how to get to Hill Street.

Sept. 28, 2015

Thanks Ken for a great overview of a sad day in San Diego radio. All of us former radio guys like you and I feel the pain of the staff and owners. I learned something about you from Bob's post - my sister Brenda Harrison, as editor of O'side High newspaper, used to read the high school news on KUDE too. 1959-60.

Sept. 29, 2015

I'd also love to know how a non-profit religious foundation is funded to run 118 radio stations with no commercials? And have $12 million in cash to buy another one?

Sept. 29, 2015

Money laundering?

Sept. 29, 2015

Once they buy these stations, it doesn't cost much to run them since there is zero local content and no ad sales people. How many employees will KPRI need now, if any?

Sept. 29, 2015

I assume the just use the transmitter as a repeater, with no local offices or staff? Just like one of my former stations KAVO 107.1 in Fallbrook. Transmitter is still broadcasting in an avocado field high atop a hill, but station is Spanish out of New York.

Sept. 30, 2015

Thanks Ken. That's a very good question! And yes Bob Hudson. Am still trying to find Hill Street. Haven't found it yet. Good to see you're now gainfully...uh....involved with web commenting. We all do what do don't we Bob!

Sept. 29, 2015

oops....meant to say...We all do what we do, don't we Bob!

Sept. 29, 2015

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