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San Diego's poverty rate 15.7 percent

U.S. Census Bureau finds El Cajon and Escondido county's highest

Poverty rates in San Diego, 2014
Poverty rates in San Diego, 2014

The percentage of City of San Diego residents living below the poverty line slipped slightly last year to 15.7 percent from 2013's 15.8 percent, according to United States Census Bureau data released today (September 17). The Center on Policy Initiatives pulled San Diego data out of the Census numbers.

Top 10 industries employing San Diegans

Countywide, El Cajon has the highest poverty rate at 22.8 percent, followed by Escondido at 21.6 percent. But 28.5 percent of Escondido children live below the poverty line, versus 28.0 percent for El Cajon. In the City of San Diego, 20.4 percent of children live below the poverty line.

The poverty rate for whites in the City of San Diego is 9.3 percent, compared with 24.8 percent for Hispanics, 22.9 percent for African-Americans, and 13.3 percent for Asians.

Most City of San Diego households have less purchasing power than before the recession began, says the center. Median combined household income in the city last was $67,800, nearly $3000 lower than 2007 when adjusted for inflation.

Kyra Greene, the center's research and policy analyst, says, "The San Diego region added more than 40,000 jobs in the past year, but too many of those jobs are paying poverty wages."

An alarming 41.5 percent of those below the poverty line are working.

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Poverty rates in San Diego, 2014
Poverty rates in San Diego, 2014

The percentage of City of San Diego residents living below the poverty line slipped slightly last year to 15.7 percent from 2013's 15.8 percent, according to United States Census Bureau data released today (September 17). The Center on Policy Initiatives pulled San Diego data out of the Census numbers.

Top 10 industries employing San Diegans

Countywide, El Cajon has the highest poverty rate at 22.8 percent, followed by Escondido at 21.6 percent. But 28.5 percent of Escondido children live below the poverty line, versus 28.0 percent for El Cajon. In the City of San Diego, 20.4 percent of children live below the poverty line.

The poverty rate for whites in the City of San Diego is 9.3 percent, compared with 24.8 percent for Hispanics, 22.9 percent for African-Americans, and 13.3 percent for Asians.

Most City of San Diego households have less purchasing power than before the recession began, says the center. Median combined household income in the city last was $67,800, nearly $3000 lower than 2007 when adjusted for inflation.

Kyra Greene, the center's research and policy analyst, says, "The San Diego region added more than 40,000 jobs in the past year, but too many of those jobs are paying poverty wages."

An alarming 41.5 percent of those below the poverty line are working.

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18

"For decades El Cajon has become a magnet for many of Iraq's persecuted. Thousands of Kurds started arriving following a failed revolt in 1976. After the 1991 Gulf War, Saddam Hussein crushed a Shi'a uprising encouraged by the senior Bush Administration, and some 1,500 Shi'a who escaped found their way to El Cajon. There are also Mandaeans, whose 2,000-year-old Gnostic culture is in danger of extinction, and Yezidis, practitioners of an ancient syncretic religion. But far and away, it's the estimated 30,000 Chaldean Catholics in El Cajon who have enlivened the city with Iraqi culture, many having first settled there in the 1950s. Main Street is nicknamed "Little Baghdad" for the proliferation of Arab-language signs and Iraqi-owned restaurants, markets, jewelry stores, auto shops, and cultural centers.

According to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study on the health of Iraqi refugees who settled in the United States after 2009, 67 percent of adults are unemployed, including 85 percent of those over 45 years old.

Of course we would like another plate of this fiasco by bringing over Syrian nomadic tribes that are also illiterate, uneducated and fertile. Let's pile on more corruption and poverty and create a little Damascus welfare state.

Sept. 17, 2015

Ponzi: I understand how you feel. In my view, we went into the Middle East on false pretenses, and are partly and perhaps greatly responsible for the chaos there. Yes, taking on Syrian refugees will cause some hardships for Americans. But I think we have to do it. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 17, 2015

If an immigrant, legal or otherwise, comes to the US it is difficult for them to get welfare benefits. If an immigrant is classified as a refugee they automatically qualify for grants, welfare, medical care, social security and housing. We have far to many refugee's displacing American workers and lowering the standard of living for all of us. Most of the Chaldean's live in and around Rancho San Diego. They have more money that their Muslim counterparts.

Sept. 18, 2015

AlexClarke: Yes, refugees will displace some Americans in jobs. It's a price we must pay for a jingoistic, completely dishonest foreign policy in the Bush 2 administration. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 18, 2015

careful, comments along these lines forced the mayor of el cajon out of office :)

Sept. 18, 2015

Murphyjunk: It must be disheartening, depressing to be removed as a mayor of El Cajon. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 18, 2015

Don: I think is must be disheartening, depressing to be THE mayor of El Cajon.

Sept. 19, 2015

AlexClarke: Yes, but I would guess that ambitious people keep running for the job.. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 19, 2015

We "have to do it"? For how many of them? What happens when we reach that number and more still want to come?

A lifeboat cannot take every drowning person. It'll sit lower and lower until it tips over, and everyone's drowning again. We can, and should, take LIMITED numbers of people who show that they can be contributing members of society. But the masses screeching, "We're poor, we're hungry, we have nothing, we need everything" should be turned away before they capsize the US. We've already taken on far, far too much unpayable debt in a hopeless attempt to "fight poverty" that has done nothing but created more of it.

Sept. 18, 2015

jnojr: I'm not sure our anti-poverty programs have created more poverty, but I agree that they have been very expensive and we haven't gotten our money's worth. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 18, 2015

Some of my ancestors, as Will Rogers once put it, "met the boat." The boat(s) of Eastern Hemisphere refugees who landed here starting about 500 years ago. If all of "my people" want all of those refugees to go back where they came from, leaving only "pure" Native Americans, about an eighth of me would have to stay here and the rest of me sent back to wherever my Eastern Hemisphere antecedents came from.

Something of a "Shylock" conundrum, eh?

Sept. 18, 2015

Twister: You mean you don't know where your ancestors came from? Didn't your family keep records? Mine did -- on both sides. And I must confess it makes depressing reading sometimes.

Of course, most of the entries are euphemistic. I remember one: "tended to be feisty at times." I understand he was a barroom brawler. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 19, 2015

I am a highly "mixed" "breed." No petty-greed. Records, records? I don' need no stinkin' RECORDS! (While that statement is a take-off on a famous quote, since it isn't accurate, all I can say is "apologies to whoever wrote the line in "The Treasure of Sierra Madre" movie, one which should be required understanding for all young people out to seek their fortune.)

Sept. 19, 2015

Twister: Are you going to be a pure American? Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 20, 2015

Twister: You don't need no records of your ancestry as long as you know your family was placed on earth by some divine power. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 20, 2015

I like the "dirty snowball" theory.

Sept. 20, 2015

Twister: You mean that the snowball collects more dirt as it rolls downhill? Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 21, 2015

RICHEST 20 PERCENT IN SAN DIEGO TAKE 50.5 PERCENT OF THE INCOME. The Center on Policy Initiatives has culled the Census data that came out this month for more information. Among the findings: More than half of income in the city (50.5 percent) went to the richest 20 percent of households last year, while the bottom 20 percent had only 3 percent of the income. The top 5 percent had 22 percent of all income. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 23, 2015

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