Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

State coastal commission bonkers?

Meeting on plan to store San Onofre nuclear waste 100 feet from ocean

San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station
San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station

The California Coastal Commission meets tomorrow in Long Beach to consider a matter critical to North County San Diegans: will 3.6 million pounds of nuclear waste repose within 100 feet of the ocean and only inches over the water table at San Onofre, site of the nuclear facility that has been shuttered?

Ray Lutz of San Diego's Citizens Oversight says that at the rate shorelines are eroding, the waste could be well out in the ocean in 100 years. If the commission decides to permit Southern California Edison to go ahead with its storage plan, the decision will be appealed, says Lutz.

Local attorneys Mike Aguirre and Maria Severson will argue tomorrow that the commission cannot make a decision now because both the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) and Edison are under criminal investigation for their secret role, and possible perjury, that led to the utility commission's decision to foist $3.3 billion of decommissioning expenses on ratepayers instead of on shareholders.

The staff of the coastal commission has recommended approval of Edison's proposal. Two units at San Onofre were shut down in 2012, "and some 2668 fuel assemblies remain in wet storage pools in the Units 2 and 3 fuel handling buildings," says the staff report. "This fuel is highly radioactive and requires secure storage for thousands of years to prevent harm to humans and the environment."

Continues the report, "At present, there are no feasible off-site alternatives to the proposed project. No permanent fuel repository or other interim storage facility exists." The staff believes that Edison's proposal for storage "would be sufficient to assure stability and structural integrity against geologic hazards, including seismic ground shaking, slope failure, tsunamis and flooding, and coastal erosion, without requiring shoreline protection." The staff recommends that the Edison proposal be authorized for 20 years.

In response to that statement, Aguirre and Severson provided the commission with the final report on Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant disaster. In that case, official and cultural over-confidence was one of the reasons for the nation's lack of preparedness for the calamity.

Although other governmental bodies, such as the federal Energy Department and Nuclear Regulatory Commission, are involved in nuclear waste matters, Lutz thinks the coastal commission "is the only clear-cut way to stop this in its tracks."

Early this morning (October 5), Aguirre composed a letter to the Coastal Commission, noting that "Southern Calfornia Edison has a track record of dishonest dealings with federal and state regulatory agencies." Aguirre particularly wants details on $5 million that Edison proposes to give the coastal commission, allegedly for mitigation and monitoring purposes.

"[Edison] consciously chose not to develop a site to remove the waste during the last 30 years," says the letter.

Lutz says it would be possible to move the waste to a spot in the desert if train tracks could be reinforced and train cars remodeled to take the weight of the casks holding the waste.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Unexpected views from some San Diego African Americans

"I don't care if you're black or white"
San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station
San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station

The California Coastal Commission meets tomorrow in Long Beach to consider a matter critical to North County San Diegans: will 3.6 million pounds of nuclear waste repose within 100 feet of the ocean and only inches over the water table at San Onofre, site of the nuclear facility that has been shuttered?

Ray Lutz of San Diego's Citizens Oversight says that at the rate shorelines are eroding, the waste could be well out in the ocean in 100 years. If the commission decides to permit Southern California Edison to go ahead with its storage plan, the decision will be appealed, says Lutz.

Local attorneys Mike Aguirre and Maria Severson will argue tomorrow that the commission cannot make a decision now because both the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) and Edison are under criminal investigation for their secret role, and possible perjury, that led to the utility commission's decision to foist $3.3 billion of decommissioning expenses on ratepayers instead of on shareholders.

The staff of the coastal commission has recommended approval of Edison's proposal. Two units at San Onofre were shut down in 2012, "and some 2668 fuel assemblies remain in wet storage pools in the Units 2 and 3 fuel handling buildings," says the staff report. "This fuel is highly radioactive and requires secure storage for thousands of years to prevent harm to humans and the environment."

Continues the report, "At present, there are no feasible off-site alternatives to the proposed project. No permanent fuel repository or other interim storage facility exists." The staff believes that Edison's proposal for storage "would be sufficient to assure stability and structural integrity against geologic hazards, including seismic ground shaking, slope failure, tsunamis and flooding, and coastal erosion, without requiring shoreline protection." The staff recommends that the Edison proposal be authorized for 20 years.

In response to that statement, Aguirre and Severson provided the commission with the final report on Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant disaster. In that case, official and cultural over-confidence was one of the reasons for the nation's lack of preparedness for the calamity.

Although other governmental bodies, such as the federal Energy Department and Nuclear Regulatory Commission, are involved in nuclear waste matters, Lutz thinks the coastal commission "is the only clear-cut way to stop this in its tracks."

Early this morning (October 5), Aguirre composed a letter to the Coastal Commission, noting that "Southern Calfornia Edison has a track record of dishonest dealings with federal and state regulatory agencies." Aguirre particularly wants details on $5 million that Edison proposes to give the coastal commission, allegedly for mitigation and monitoring purposes.

"[Edison] consciously chose not to develop a site to remove the waste during the last 30 years," says the letter.

Lutz says it would be possible to move the waste to a spot in the desert if train tracks could be reinforced and train cars remodeled to take the weight of the casks holding the waste.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Two poems by Julia Wehner

A reminder of how richly good it is to feel, and to live
Next Article

The Red, White, and Blue can never tell a lie: San Diego was the place to be for the Fourth of July!

America’s Finest County
Comments
26

Well, if there are "no feasible off-site alternatives to the proposed project. No permanent fuel repository or other interim storage facility exists." that's because of leftists and NIMBYs. The spent fuel exists. There's no way to go back in time an uninvent nuclear power. We need to get Yucca Mountain operational. And we need real research into alternative energy, including various nuclear technologies like pebble-bed reactors. Today, all we get is handouts to political favorites like Solyndra who take the money and run. The private sector can solve this problem, but not when it's taxed and regulated to far beyond death. Note that GOVERNMENT is an enormous part of the problems surrounding the demise of SONGS.

Oct. 5, 2015

jnojr: Of course. Given that the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC), a government agency, was involved in getting Edison off the hook on San Onofre's failure, the government was involved. Crookedly involved. However, the equipment failure was purely a failure of the private sector-- equipment that was to last 40 years lasted one year.

The CPUC held secret meetings with Edison so that the costs could be shifted to ratepayers and not to shareholders. The CPUC and Edison together rigged the system so that the government-required report on what went wrong was never done. And on and on.

But keep in mind that Edison is in the private sector. So in its totality, the rape of the ratepayer was a joint action of the government, CPUC, and the private sector, Edison. To believe that the market system could have solved this problem is to believe in the tooth fairy. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 5, 2015

What! There us no Tooth Fairy? No Don say it ain't so.

Oct. 6, 2015

AlexClarke: Don't take my word for it. Put your false teeth under your pillow at night and see if there isn't an envelope full of cash there in the morning. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 6, 2015

false teeth get fake money

Oct. 6, 2015

Murphyjunk: You mean bitcoins? See entry above. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 6, 2015

Murphyjunk: Now who's denigrating a sacred being, the tooth fairy? You are, not me. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 9, 2015

Representative Darrell Issa is Co-Sponsored the September 29, 2015 H.R. 3643 Interim Consolidated Storage Act at the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

"To amend the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 to authorize the Secretary of Energy to enter into contracts for the storage of certain high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel, take title to certain high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel, and make certain expenditures from the Nuclear Waste Fund."

http://riponadvance.com/stories/510640948-interim-consolidated-storage-act-will-address-nuclear-waste-concerns

https://www.congress.gov/bill/114th-congress/house-bill/3643/text

http://issa.house.gov/press-releases/2015/09/issa-sponsors-bill-to-create-interim-storage-site-for-nuclear-waste/

Oct. 5, 2015

laplayaheritage: The Yucca Mountain imbroglio is one for the books -- and one that isn't going away soon. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 5, 2015

Odd that anyone believes or ever believed that nuclear waste could be safely stored anywhere. Homo sap. is like any other mass murderer--after he gets rid of all the other species, he will turn the gun on himself.

Tw

Oct. 5, 2015

Twister: For decades, people have predicted mass nuclear destruction. It hasn't come. But it still could: nuclear proliferation is still a problem. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 5, 2015

I'm predicting mounting piles of nuclear waste amounting to a mountain that will slowly render more and more of the earth less and habitable until it's all gone.

Ye who would seek wisdom would do well to dwell in humor: A farmer who won the lottery was asked what he would do with all that money. "I reckon I'll jest keep farmin' 'till it's all gone!"

Oct. 6, 2015

Twister: That's the economic situation of independent farmers these days. They keep losing money but keep farming. But your comment reminds me of a joke.

Fella calls his wife: "I just won the lottery! Pack your bags!" Wife: "Oh goodie! Should I pack winter or summer clothes?" Fella: "It doesn't matter. I just want you out of the house." Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 6, 2015

John Boyersmith: I confess I don't get it. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 6, 2015

I think ya gotta be freebasin'

Oct. 6, 2015

Apparently JB ain't with us anymore. Ain't it odd (or am I odd?) that folks who start something never finish it?

Oct. 9, 2015

Don — If I could have attended, here is what I would have said:

Please don’t allow SCE to store Nuclear Waste On-Site. If nothing else SCE needs to do a EIR Type Study (including public comments) to see if moving it as far as possible to the East of Hwy 5 (and the railroad tracks) is possible and if so, why has it not been do before now, since it would provide far better protection than storing it on the coastline…

Oct. 6, 2015

CaptD: How about moving it out in the desert? What's the chance of Edison doing an EIR when it refused to do an investigation of the San Onofre mishap -- something that was required by law? CPUC helped Edison dodge the law. It will again. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 6, 2015

Which desert? How about making bullets out of it and spraying them indiscriminately all over the Middle East? A way of committing slow and painful genocide? Nope--that's been done. To a limited degree--but just wait!

Das genie ist outen from ze bottle!

Oops! You said "in" the desert. You must have meant some kind of ghost train condemned to move around in the desert interminably--something like musical chairs or roulette?

Hmmmm . . .

Oct. 9, 2015

COMMISSION APPROVES EDISON PLAN. The Coastal Commission today (October 6) unanimously approved Southern California Edison's plan to have 3.6 million pounds of nuclear waste within 100 feet of the ocean at the shuttered San Onofre's North County location. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 6, 2015

Don,

You should send the Accostem Commission a copy of this: https://youtu.be/HeVPMzJOFrQ We're fuc*ed.

Oct. 7, 2015

LeeGrove: Edison says the nuclear waste will be safe along the shoreline. But who believes anything Edison says? Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 9, 2015

Mike Murphy: Why don't you ask the Coastal Commission whose pockets they reside in? Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 9, 2015

Angela Lamar: Your suggestion of sending nuclear waste into space has been posed before. I can't remember when or by whom. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 9, 2015

I presume Lamar has done the numbers?

Oct. 9, 2015

CHILDREN LIVING NEAR FUKUSHIMA SAID TO HAVE HIGH RISK OF CANCER. The Associated Press is reporting that a new study indicates that children living near the Fukushima disaster "have been diagnosed with thyroid caner at a rate 20 to 50 times that of children elsewhere." The Japanese government questions the findings. Best, Don Bauder

Oct. 9, 2015

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close