Patricia Maysent
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The intrigue surrounding the saga of UCSD Health's departed top man Paul Viviano continues, with a lengthening search underway to fill the vacancy, and approval by U.C. regents of a $516,000 interim appointment.

Paul Viviano

Paul Viviano

Paul Aisen

Paul Aisen

As previously reported here in July, Viviano abruptly abandoned his $831,147 job as chief executive officer for the University of California, San Diego Health System and associate vice chancellor for UC San Diego Health Sciences.

The administrator told the Union-Tribune that he found it "agonizing" to leave town to take over as president and chief executive of the Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles, but wanted to be nearer to his family in Huntington Beach.

The surprise shift came amid the tumult of the university’s costly legal wrangle with Alzheimer’s disease expert Paul Aisen, who resigned in June, alleging that mismanagement of the school's research programs had played havoc with his work.

A court brief filed by the University of Southern California, which lured Aisen to its faculty in a high-dollar research deal, contended that UCSD had “pressured Dr. Aisen to move [the Alzheimer’s program] to the UCSD campus so that UCSD could collect indirect costs of up to 55 percent, a move which would have crippled the program financially by diverting too much grant funding from research projects into UCSD’s Administration.”

In addition, a 2014 audit called out a series of issues regarding UCSD's handling of human body donations to the school.

Since Viviano's summer resignation, the chief executive part of his job has been filled by Patricia Maysent, who worked under him as executive director of Strategic and Business Development.

"Ms. Maysent has been serving as the CEO of UC San Diego Health System since Mr. Viviano’s departure, without any additional compensation beyond her current salary of $299,252," says a November 20 regents report.

"Since her temporary role as interim CEO is expected to continue for up to eight more months, the temporary salary is proposed to properly compensate her for her services retroactive to the date she assumed the role. Because it is retroactive, this is considered an exception to policy.”

Adds the document, "The campus proposes a base salary of $430,000 while she is in this interim role, reflecting a temporary increase of 43.7 percent.”

In addition to the base pay, the report says, Maysent will also get bonus cash from the university's Clinical Enterprise Management Recognition Plan, "with a target award of 20 percent of base salary ($86,000) and a maximum potential award of 30 percent of base salary ($129,000) for the period served as Interim Chief Executive Officer.”

Her total "target cash compensation" is listed as $516,000.

"At the conclusion of the interim appointment, Ms. Maysent will return to her former role as Executive Director, Strategic and Business Development, and her total cash compensation will revert to her total cash compensation in effect as of August 8, 2015, plus any adjustments resulting from salary programs implemented during the interim appointment."

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Comments

monaghan Dec. 11, 2015 @ 3:03 p.m.

I love it -- "a temporary increase of 43.7% in interim target cash compensation" for Ms. Maysent while she's filling the expensive shoes of UCSD's hastily-departed Dr. Viviano. Aside from UCSD's amusing convoluted description of the deal, the only saving grace in this story is that they were smart enough to ante up equal pay for the the female temp.

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Visduh Dec. 13, 2015 @ 9:30 a.m.

It's insanity for sure. Keep in mind that the medical center on a UC campus isn't part of the state-supported educational mission on the whole. But when you appoint someone as a temporary, fill-in for the permanent occupant of a position, the expectations for that person are different than they would be for a permanent fill. She would not be expected to do much more than be a caretaker, and would not be expected to begin any new initiatives or revamps of the operation. In fact, making changes would be unwelcome. I'd think she'd be honored to have been given the chance to show that the operation is in capable hands. Some additional compensation might be paid when the CEO is on board. There's another facet to this, in that she's not an MD, and the usual occupant of the position running such an operation is a medical doctor with a distinguished record. So, without the degree, her value is also diminished. BTW, the foregoing has nothing to do with her gender, it has to do with professional qualifications.

Toot, toot, the gravy train is running down the track.

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dwbat Dec. 13, 2015 @ 9:47 a.m.

Something smells rotten in Denmark....oops, I mean La Jolla.

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Wabbitsd Dec. 14, 2015 @ 9:17 a.m.

I am sure they get California State money, as well as Federal Grants. it's sickening, for sure. It's beyond ridiculous how these folks party away with money that has no overseers.

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rehftmann Dec. 13, 2015 @ 10:01 a.m.

A modest salary by UC standards. Check it out. Compensation is a matter of public record (transparentcalifornia.com). The big bucks go to our (well, not my) athletic department for leading UC's athletes to the glory that makes California a world leader in… oh forget it. The salary thing makes me so snarky I can't stand me. I'm a college professor and all I ask is that the trash cans get emptied and that's asking too much. The weight of administration isn't just the money they shovel off, it's the counterproductive administration they pile on. It's the weekend before finals and I can't get upset over this. I'm going back to reading about terrorism or curing rare diseases, something that isn't likely to touch my life.

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dwbat Dec. 13, 2015 @ 5:49 p.m.

In other words, those who can't DO anything useful, administer!

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Visduh Dec. 15, 2015 @ 9:17 p.m.

rehftmann, good to see a post from you, in that you always have worthwhile comments. I loved the comment that salary matters make you so snarky that you can't stand yourself. I think that you're saying something to the tune of administrators, instead of making the work environment better, actually get in the way of those who do the real work. And whenever there is a new staff position, such as for "diversity" at UCSD, the only thing that person does is create a huge and dysfunctional bureaucracy that hamstrings the faculty and staff, usually with no real benefit. Sigh.

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davebabb94 Dec. 18, 2015 @ 5:19 a.m.

If you ever wonder why UCSD focuses heavily on recruiting world-class researchers and their programs by using this heavily compensated Strategic and Business Development position, that line about UCSD collecting 55% of the program's research budget should explain it. A few decades ago I had a part time position with a similar group at UCSD where I helped build a database of all the facilities research space at all the campus locations. The purpose of the work was to give UCSD a way to calculate the value of square footage of research space. I remember correlating the research grants against the space I measured (by the way physical sciences/medicine/engineering/oceanography were 99.98% of the money). At the time I was there, the "tax" UCSD charged to researchers on their grants was around 30% for "indirect cost recovery" i.e. for providing them with the facilities to do their work. It seems in the intervening years they've managed to ratchet up this fee significantly as well. If you want to think about this position as a salesman bringing in revenue to the university, then the compensation may be appropriate for the job.

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