4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

The party house next door

Cities, state debate residential vacation rentals

From Airbnb home page
From Airbnb home page

While local cities continue to seek regulations on short-term vacation rentals, a bill making its way to the state legislature may provide the teeth needed for effective enforcement. Unless, that is, web businesses like Airbnb that facilitate transactions between homeowner and tenant are able to derail those plans.

Carlsbad's city council on Tuesday, April 21, took steps toward implementing a total ban on residential vacation rentals, except in certain "coastal zones" west of Interstate 5, closing off about two-thirds of the city's neighborhoods. Other patchwork regulations exist throughout the county, including a blanket ban in Coronado, a ban in apartment and condominium buildings in Encinitas, and a seven-day minimum length of stay in Solana Beach.

In San Diego, an overflow crowd showed up to a city-council committee meeting on Wednesday, April 22, to voice their opinions, both in favor and against any new regulations. Airbnb representatives, who contacted customers who use their service to advertise units for rent in an attempt to drum up attendance, handed out stickers outside the meeting room.

Those supporting the rentals said they took care to be conscientious neighbors, and that the income from renting out spare bedrooms or even entire residences allowed them to pay for needed repairs or supplement meager incomes. A La Jolla man said he'd face foreclosure if he was no longer able to rent out a second unit on his property to vacationing tourists, who pay much more than month-to-month tenants.

Opponents cried foul, claiming that by turning houses in residential neighborhoods into hotels, they were being bombarded with a flow of strangers who litter, pick fights with residents, and host loud parties into the night.

There was so much public interest in the matter that the committee agreed to take up the issue again on May 29. No proposals for management within the city have been written, though councilmembers floated ideas such as limiting vacation-rental use of a residence to once per month or requiring a special use permit, the suggestion of council president Sherri Lightner.

Also at issue is whether property owners are collecting and remitting the proper transient occupancy taxes to cities, let alone reporting their businesses at all.

Enter Senate Bill 593, a measure penned by senator Mike McGuire (D), whose district covers the state's northern coast from San Francisco to the Oregon border.

The bill would require operators of residential short-term rentals to file quarterly reports with local municipalities, including information on the addresses where rental activity is taking place, length of guests' stays, and total rental fees collected. It could also allow cities and counties to compel property owners to collect and remit transient occupancy taxes, as is currently required of hotel and bed-and-breakfast owners.

The measure passed through the senate’s Transportation and Housing Committee on April 21. Once again, Airbnb rallied its customer base to fight further regulations.

"What we do not need is another layer of regulation," one Airbnb "host" told the committee, according to a Courthouse News Service report. Privacy groups also "expressed concern about the privacy implications of the government's collecting information from a company," though McGuire noted that if the landlords were operating within the law, they were already providing this information to the IRS and state tax collectors.

Airbnb, a San Francisco–based company reportedly valued at up to $20 billion, has vowed to continue the fight, launching a website to mobilize owners to lobby for reduced regulation of the vacation-rental market.

(corrected 4/24, 9:00 a.m.)

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

San Diego County lakes and their fish, Descanso neighbors feud, Cameron Corners for sale

Logging trucks in Julian, Christian cowboys in Lakeside
Next Article

New Motion Beverages and Embolden Beer Co brew 32 flavors

Conjoined startups buy familiar Miramar brewery to brew beer, booch, hard tea, and more
From Airbnb home page
From Airbnb home page

While local cities continue to seek regulations on short-term vacation rentals, a bill making its way to the state legislature may provide the teeth needed for effective enforcement. Unless, that is, web businesses like Airbnb that facilitate transactions between homeowner and tenant are able to derail those plans.

Carlsbad's city council on Tuesday, April 21, took steps toward implementing a total ban on residential vacation rentals, except in certain "coastal zones" west of Interstate 5, closing off about two-thirds of the city's neighborhoods. Other patchwork regulations exist throughout the county, including a blanket ban in Coronado, a ban in apartment and condominium buildings in Encinitas, and a seven-day minimum length of stay in Solana Beach.

In San Diego, an overflow crowd showed up to a city-council committee meeting on Wednesday, April 22, to voice their opinions, both in favor and against any new regulations. Airbnb representatives, who contacted customers who use their service to advertise units for rent in an attempt to drum up attendance, handed out stickers outside the meeting room.

Those supporting the rentals said they took care to be conscientious neighbors, and that the income from renting out spare bedrooms or even entire residences allowed them to pay for needed repairs or supplement meager incomes. A La Jolla man said he'd face foreclosure if he was no longer able to rent out a second unit on his property to vacationing tourists, who pay much more than month-to-month tenants.

Opponents cried foul, claiming that by turning houses in residential neighborhoods into hotels, they were being bombarded with a flow of strangers who litter, pick fights with residents, and host loud parties into the night.

There was so much public interest in the matter that the committee agreed to take up the issue again on May 29. No proposals for management within the city have been written, though councilmembers floated ideas such as limiting vacation-rental use of a residence to once per month or requiring a special use permit, the suggestion of council president Sherri Lightner.

Also at issue is whether property owners are collecting and remitting the proper transient occupancy taxes to cities, let alone reporting their businesses at all.

Enter Senate Bill 593, a measure penned by senator Mike McGuire (D), whose district covers the state's northern coast from San Francisco to the Oregon border.

The bill would require operators of residential short-term rentals to file quarterly reports with local municipalities, including information on the addresses where rental activity is taking place, length of guests' stays, and total rental fees collected. It could also allow cities and counties to compel property owners to collect and remit transient occupancy taxes, as is currently required of hotel and bed-and-breakfast owners.

The measure passed through the senate’s Transportation and Housing Committee on April 21. Once again, Airbnb rallied its customer base to fight further regulations.

"What we do not need is another layer of regulation," one Airbnb "host" told the committee, according to a Courthouse News Service report. Privacy groups also "expressed concern about the privacy implications of the government's collecting information from a company," though McGuire noted that if the landlords were operating within the law, they were already providing this information to the IRS and state tax collectors.

Airbnb, a San Francisco–based company reportedly valued at up to $20 billion, has vowed to continue the fight, launching a website to mobilize owners to lobby for reduced regulation of the vacation-rental market.

(corrected 4/24, 9:00 a.m.)

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Paul Winter’s Winter Solstice Celebration, The Art of Dr Seuss Holiday Exhibition

Events December 6-December 9, 2020
Next Article

Belated Belushi bio

There was a year-and-a-half stretch when Belushi was clean and sober, and it showed in his work.
Comments
1

Renting homes out for vacations is a pure capitalist venture. One can rent a room or two or the whole house for a few days and get as much money as someone who would rent their house by the month. Money, money and these houses are surrounded by primarily conservative well-to-do people who for the most part hate regulation of anything but when it is next door to them that is different. LOL

April 23, 2015

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close